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y separately published work icon Heide selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Heide
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Heide is an epic poem about history, painting, painters, patrons and the people who made art happen in Australia — from Louis Buvelot to Edith Rowan, Tom Roberts and Robert Streeton to Vassilief, Nolan, Tucker, Joy Hester, the Boyds, Mirka Mora, and Albert Namatjira, with a particular focus on the artists gathered around Sunday and John Reed at Heide in Melbourne.

'It is a poem that explores the influence of art and poetry on the psyche, and the influence of social class on both, from the upper echelons and industrialists of Melbourne, to the struggle of the working class through such artists as Alisa O’Connor, Noel Counihan and Yosl Bergner. It begins with the foundation of Melbourne, and in its epic scope traverses an encyclopaedic range of subjects, assembled from facts, quotations, proverbs, definitions, historical documents, newspaper accounts and the author’s own reminiscences. 

'Heide is about the poets and artists who put their lives on the line, the Australian preoccupation with landscape, the dominance of a masculinist aesthetic, the sidelining and denigration of Indigenous art, the struggle of women artists to assert their influence and presence, and the impact of migration on Australian culture. 

'It is a long poem made up of almost 300 poems, each bringing to life characters and incidents that are fleshed out in vivid detail and with a dramatic intensity unique in Australian poetry.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Epic poem, but made up of 300 individual poems.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Abigail Fisher Reviews Heide by Π.O. Abigail Fisher , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , August no. 25 2020;

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry

'Trying unsuccessfully to write this review in June, I ride alongside the Eastern Freeway to Bulleen. The gallery is closed but I visit the bees, the bare trees, the corrugated cows. Plaques along the path by the river gloss over the Wurundjeri history of Bolin (‘lyrebird’, later Anglicised to Bulleen) and the process by which Indigenous custodians of the land were ‘driven out’ of the area throughout the 1850s, while documenting with painstaking detail the white settler casualties of severe floods in the following decades. That night I google the scar-tree, a red gum towering over the entrance to the kitchen garden, and learn its Woiwurrung name: Yingabeal, or ‘song tree’. Yingabeal is also a marker tree, situated at the convergence of five song lines and estimated to be between 600 and 700 years old.' (Introduction)

“Poetry Doesn’t Have to Be a Quick-anything” : A Conversation with TT.O. Amy Lin , 2020 single work column
— Appears in: Los Angeles Review of Books , April 2020;

'Australian poet TT.O. has been working on his latest epic poem, Heide, for about eight years. Heide the spiritual heart of Australian modernism in both poetry and art circles. The work marries times — past, present, and futures. It shows connections between art, politics, history, anarchism, poetry, struggles, the military, and his earlier works. It ranges across numerous biographies, and stands back to locate the whole in its epic grandeur; from the building of Melbourne as a city, to the establishment of its politics, art practice, poetry, and psychology. All the parts fit together, even when they fly off in different directions. It contains world history in both its writing and references. It takes off from where the Ern Malley Hoax bludgeoned Australian poetry into submission.' (Introduction)

Heide Parsed and Present Tim Wright , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25 January 2020; (p. 25)

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry

'The figures of the Heide circle have attained the status of myth and legend, and as such they are available for reimagining, just as Ned Kelly was for Sidney Nolan. That is one of the implicit claims, and achievements, of this extremely ambitious work of social and art history as poetry. Heide is a long, composite work made up of 219 separate poems, many of which are themselves series of poems. It is also the final volume of what is now revealed to be a trilogy, one that adds up to just over 2000 pages (and weighs in at a challenging 2.5kg).' (Introduction)

From Fitzroy to Heide James Jiang , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , January / February no. 418 2020; (p. 61)

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry
'Heide is the final instalment of an epic trilogy that began with 24 Hours (1996) and was followed by Fitzroy: A biography (2015). It also marks a departure for Π.O. In this third volume (the only one in the trilogy not to be self-published), the unofficial poet laureate of Fitzroy turns his attention away from the migrant and working-class characters of his beloved suburb toward the names that line the bookshelves and gallery walls of the nation’s most august institutions. In more than 500 pages of verse, Heide plots the history, and colonial prehistory, of the artistic milieu that gathered at Sunday and John Reed’s property in Heidelberg. The book’s concern with institutional memory aligns it with Alexander Sokurov’s Russian Ark (2002), a film famous for its unblinking gaze down the corridors of the Winter Palace in the Hermitage Museum. Both works share an architecture of historical imagination in which the museum becomes a memory palace where the artist’s acts of listening and recording conserve without being conservative.'

(Introduction)

From Fitzroy to Heide James Jiang , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , January / February no. 418 2020; (p. 61)

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry
'Heide is the final instalment of an epic trilogy that began with 24 Hours (1996) and was followed by Fitzroy: A biography (2015). It also marks a departure for Π.O. In this third volume (the only one in the trilogy not to be self-published), the unofficial poet laureate of Fitzroy turns his attention away from the migrant and working-class characters of his beloved suburb toward the names that line the bookshelves and gallery walls of the nation’s most august institutions. In more than 500 pages of verse, Heide plots the history, and colonial prehistory, of the artistic milieu that gathered at Sunday and John Reed’s property in Heidelberg. The book’s concern with institutional memory aligns it with Alexander Sokurov’s Russian Ark (2002), a film famous for its unblinking gaze down the corridors of the Winter Palace in the Hermitage Museum. Both works share an architecture of historical imagination in which the museum becomes a memory palace where the artist’s acts of listening and recording conserve without being conservative.'

(Introduction)

Heide Parsed and Present Tim Wright , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25 January 2020; (p. 25)

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry

'The figures of the Heide circle have attained the status of myth and legend, and as such they are available for reimagining, just as Ned Kelly was for Sidney Nolan. That is one of the implicit claims, and achievements, of this extremely ambitious work of social and art history as poetry. Heide is a long, composite work made up of 219 separate poems, many of which are themselves series of poems. It is also the final volume of what is now revealed to be a trilogy, one that adds up to just over 2000 pages (and weighs in at a challenging 2.5kg).' (Introduction)

Abigail Fisher Reviews Heide by Π.O. Abigail Fisher , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , August no. 25 2020;

— Review of Heide TT. O , 2019 selected work poetry

'Trying unsuccessfully to write this review in June, I ride alongside the Eastern Freeway to Bulleen. The gallery is closed but I visit the bees, the bare trees, the corrugated cows. Plaques along the path by the river gloss over the Wurundjeri history of Bolin (‘lyrebird’, later Anglicised to Bulleen) and the process by which Indigenous custodians of the land were ‘driven out’ of the area throughout the 1850s, while documenting with painstaking detail the white settler casualties of severe floods in the following decades. That night I google the scar-tree, a red gum towering over the entrance to the kitchen garden, and learn its Woiwurrung name: Yingabeal, or ‘song tree’. Yingabeal is also a marker tree, situated at the convergence of five song lines and estimated to be between 600 and 700 years old.' (Introduction)

“Poetry Doesn’t Have to Be a Quick-anything” : A Conversation with TT.O. Amy Lin , 2020 single work column
— Appears in: Los Angeles Review of Books , April 2020;

'Australian poet TT.O. has been working on his latest epic poem, Heide, for about eight years. Heide the spiritual heart of Australian modernism in both poetry and art circles. The work marries times — past, present, and futures. It shows connections between art, politics, history, anarchism, poetry, struggles, the military, and his earlier works. It ranges across numerous biographies, and stands back to locate the whole in its epic grandeur; from the building of Melbourne as a city, to the establishment of its politics, art practice, poetry, and psychology. All the parts fit together, even when they fly off in different directions. It contains world history in both its writing and references. It takes off from where the Ern Malley Hoax bludgeoned Australian poetry into submission.' (Introduction)

Last amended 16 Nov 2020 09:43:50
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