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Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Combatting Racism to Create a Better Australia: the Potential of the National Cross-curriculum Priority of Teaching Aboriginal Histories and Cultures
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The need for anti-racism education in Australia is evident in the regular incidents of racism experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. By not providing an alternative discourse to the racism in society, students leave school carrying into their employment and other spheres of adult life the prejudices they have developed. Although teaching against racism is not directly addressed in the new Australian curriculum, the teaching of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures has been made a cross-curriculum priority. This paper examines the potential for the national cross-curriculum priority -- and particularly the facilitation of a positive discourse about Aboriginal cultures, histories and achievements -- to achieve anti-racism learning outcomes. It explores how a program of learning, co-designed with an Aboriginal Elder and educator, moved students to imagine the experiences of Aboriginal peoples, and, as a result, drop prejudices and adopt more positive thoughts and feelings towards them.' (Author's abstract) 

 

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australian Aboriginal Studies no. 2 2019 16848945 2019 periodical issue 'Are we nearly there? ‘Aboriginal disadvantage’ may soon become an outmoded term that represents an obsolete concept. Guided by decades of collaborative research that pointed out the consequences of pathologising identities using a discourse of deficit — and which spelled out the positives of adopting an alternative approach — the public discourse about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is finally beginning to change. The term ‘Indigenous excellence’ was created to draw thinking away from deficit towards a strengths-based approach. The new term provoked much-needed new thinking. The change is a testament to the persistence and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have for decades committed to the promise of research. The change happened because generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices focused on changing the discourse about our peoples. Policymakers and service providers are now finally changing the narrative and turning away from the concept of disadvantage to focus on strengths-based approaches.' (Editorial introduction) 2019 pg. 41-50
Last amended 24 Jun 2019 11:26:19
41-50 Combatting Racism to Create a Better Australia: the Potential of the National Cross-curriculum Priority of Teaching Aboriginal Histories and Culturessmall AustLit logo Australian Aboriginal Studies
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