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y separately published work icon Australian Poetry Journal periodical issue  
Alternative title: Spoken
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... vol. 8 no. 2 2018 of Australian Poetry Journal est. 2011 Australian Poetry Journal
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

‘Australian Poetry Journal’, Volume 8.2 – ‘spoken’, features new works by more than 60 Australian poets, with poetry guest-edited by prominent spoken-word poets and curators, Andrew Galan and David Stavanger. They have curated 42 poems, selected with a focus on producing the first in-print journal of Australian spoken word; it also includes one suite by American poet, Adam Day. This section includes a poem by the late, highly esteemed Candy Royalle. Following the ‘spoken’ selection is a separate section of 19 poems, which are all new works commissioned by Australian Poetry and presented across three of its 2018 festival events – at Sydney Writers’ Festival, Melbourne Writers Festival, and Queensland Poetry Festival. Edited by Toby Fitch, this Big Bent series is an exploration of gender and language queering. In a new publication development for AP, both sections of poems are accompanied by sound-recordings. In the case of the ‘spoken’ section, 15 poets have been recorded, along with a pre-existing recording of Candy performing her poem. In the case of the Big Bent section, the seven poets who read at MWF have been recorded.' (Introduction)

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2018 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Foreword, Andrew Galan , David Stavanger , single work

'American performance poet Emily XYZ wrote In the opening (typed) notes of her (printed) songbook that she viewed the stage work contained within (pages) "as something to be heard than read, and as performance scripts rather than literature".

'We live in a world moving further from the limitations of binaries whilst still clutching to the need to define things in concrete. The duality of performed and written poetry has been forged by reaction as much as revolution. Many in power are unsettled by the continued rise of a poetics that can be understood without academic assistance. The loss of 'hard-won technique', of contested space. The growing degree of diversity. The discovery of access. Poems as entertainment, as popular culture. Poems as air. Spoken Word is both a new and an ancient aesthetic. A turning toward the fringe, the feral, the first, the unfinished, the unbound, the speaking tongue. Minority and First Nation voices interrogating a binary world to birth new-old lines:

 
InshaAllah means, there arc many worlds. Maybe in one, you are not dead 
Don't make me choose / For I am both, l am more 

(Introduction)

(p. 1)
Old Guysi"get to the club every evening early", Max Ryan , single work poetry (p. 13)
In the Beginning Without Endi"to have language throb more than reason", Pascalle Burton , single work poetry (p. 14-15)
A House in Ruined Reposei"the door is not open", Steve Smart , single work poetry (p. 16-17)
Forty-nine Mobile Phonesi"what is the sound of a kiss between a man & a man if", Scott-Patrick Mitchell , single work poetry (p. 18-19)
On Your Dad, Troy Wong , single work poetry (p. 20-21)
Hey, Mary Shelleyi"Hey, Mary Shelley", Emilie Zoey Baker , single work poetry (p. 22-24)
The Poems below Are the Voice of the Current President of the United States, Adam Day , single work poetry (p. 25)
#DontMakeMeChoosei"#TreatyNow", Claire G. Coleman , single work poetry (p. 26)
Call and Respondi"@06:00 father's departure signals the beginning of the school day;", Emily Sun , single work poetry (p. 27)
InshaAllahi"In my language, InshaAllah means: forever", Sara Saleh , single work poetry (p. 28-29)
The BBQi"The Pushers, the Gangsters", TT. O , single work poetry (p. 30-32)
About the Girls Who Are Taken by Flanniesi"it is not as id it's top of mind, evading or issue dodging", Sandra Renew , single work poetry (p. 33)
The Clocks in the Tea Rooms Are Ten Minutes Fasti"my friends keep disappearing", Anna Fern , single work poetry (p. 34-35)
Cop It Sweeti"Gone are the days", Lorna Munro , single work poetry (p. 36-38)
The Leaves Still Speak Well of Youi"he walks into the woods", Ahmad Al Rady , single work poetry (p. 39)
Todayi"we praised the machine hiss that her body became", Ahmad Al Rady , single work poetry (p. 39)
Like Wet Jazzi"how cold the world at 4.30 a.m.", Ahmad Al Rady , single work poetry (p. 39)
'His-and-Her' Sinki"'It's a double sink, 'his-and-hers' sink. The basins are cold and smooth,", Es Foong , single work poetry (p. 40-41)
What It's Really like to Grow up with Lesbians in the 70's and 80si"You will go to your first peace march before you can walk.", Quinn Eades , single work poetry (p. 42-43)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Foreword Andrew Galan , David Stavanger , 2018 single work
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 8 no. 2 2018; (p. 1)

'American performance poet Emily XYZ wrote In the opening (typed) notes of her (printed) songbook that she viewed the stage work contained within (pages) "as something to be heard than read, and as performance scripts rather than literature".

'We live in a world moving further from the limitations of binaries whilst still clutching to the need to define things in concrete. The duality of performed and written poetry has been forged by reaction as much as revolution. Many in power are unsettled by the continued rise of a poetics that can be understood without academic assistance. The loss of 'hard-won technique', of contested space. The growing degree of diversity. The discovery of access. Poems as entertainment, as popular culture. Poems as air. Spoken Word is both a new and an ancient aesthetic. A turning toward the fringe, the feral, the first, the unfinished, the unbound, the speaking tongue. Minority and First Nation voices interrogating a binary world to birth new-old lines:

 
InshaAllah means, there arc many worlds. Maybe in one, you are not dead 
Don't make me choose / For I am both, l am more 

(Introduction)

Foreword Andrew Galan , David Stavanger , 2018 single work
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 8 no. 2 2018; (p. 1)

'American performance poet Emily XYZ wrote In the opening (typed) notes of her (printed) songbook that she viewed the stage work contained within (pages) "as something to be heard than read, and as performance scripts rather than literature".

'We live in a world moving further from the limitations of binaries whilst still clutching to the need to define things in concrete. The duality of performed and written poetry has been forged by reaction as much as revolution. Many in power are unsettled by the continued rise of a poetics that can be understood without academic assistance. The loss of 'hard-won technique', of contested space. The growing degree of diversity. The discovery of access. Poems as entertainment, as popular culture. Poems as air. Spoken Word is both a new and an ancient aesthetic. A turning toward the fringe, the feral, the first, the unfinished, the unbound, the speaking tongue. Minority and First Nation voices interrogating a binary world to birth new-old lines:

 
InshaAllah means, there arc many worlds. Maybe in one, you are not dead 
Don't make me choose / For I am both, l am more 

(Introduction)

Last amended 11 Apr 2019 11:43:18
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