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y separately published work icon Zebra and Other Stories selected work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Zebra and Other Stories
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A body buried in a suburban backyard.

'A suicide pact worthy of Chekhov.

'A love affair born in a bookshop.

'The last days of Bennelong.

'And a very strange gift for a most unusual Prime Minister...

'Tantalising, poignant, wry, and just a little fantastical, this subversive collection of short fiction - and one singular novella - from bestselling author Debra Adelaide reminds us what twists of fate may be lurking just beneath the surface of the everyday.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Dedication: For my father, who always loved a joke. 

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Picador , 2019 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Dismembering, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 3-20)
Welcome to Country, Debra Adelaide , single work prose (p. 21-32)
A Fine Day, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 33-54)
Festive Food for the Whole Family, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 55-64)
How to Mend a Broken Heart, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 65-70)
Migraine for Beginners, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 71-94)
The Master Shavers' Association of Paradise, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 95-116)
Carry Your Heart, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 117-130)
I Am at Home Now, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 131-142)
No Hot Drinks in the Ward, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 143-156)
Nourishment, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 157-171)
The Recovery Position, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 172-184)
Wipe Away Your Tears, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 185-202)
Zebra, Debra Adelaide , single work short story (p. 203)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 7990736804447106098.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 336p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 29 January 2019.

      ISBN: 9781760781699

Other Formats

  • Dyslexic edition.
  • Large print.

Works about this Work

[Review] Zebra and Other Stories Helen Elliott , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , March no. 153 2019; (p. 72)

— Review of Zebra and Other Stories Debra Adelaide , 2019 selected work short story
The Hurt We Live among : Reading Zebra and Other Stories Jack Cameron Stanton , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , April 2019;

'Often, short story collections seem arbitrarily composed. They can feel tossed together in an ersatz attempt to be coherent while not adhering to an organising principle that makes them whole. Which says nothing about the quality of the stories in isolation, but is instead an observation of the lack of textual cohesion that plagues so many short-fiction collections.'  (Introduction)

Fences and Core Myths David Haworth , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 409 2019; (p. 55)

'As the United States tears itself to pieces over a proposed wall, which has in recent months transmogrified into a steel fence, here in Australia we have no right to be smug or to rubberneck. After all, Australia loves its fences. Since it was first occupied as a penal colony, this land has been bisected by a seemingly endless series of enclosures, barricades, frontiers, and fences, including some of the longest in the world: the rabbit-proof fence in Western Australia; and the dingo fence in the Eastern states. Fences, both physical and symbolic, have long been used by our leaders to banish undesirables or to constrain their movement within acceptable boundaries. Various Australian governments have forcibly removed Indigenous Australians to reserves and missions, interned so-called ‘enemy aliens’ within camps during wartime, and detained those fleeing danger or tyranny abroad within remote and offshore prisons.' (Introduction)

Debra Adelaide Zebra Andrew Fuhrmann , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 2-8 February 2019;

'You enter the hedge maze planted with lilly pilly shrubs. Dead end follows dead end as each twist and turn yields more of the same. You begin to get weary. And then there’s something remarkable. Right at the end of the labyrinth, waiting like an oracle or a punchline that baffles comprehension, you discover a live zebra calmly grazing, absolutely content and unexpected.'  (Introduction)

[Review] Zebra and Other Stories Helen Elliott , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , March no. 153 2019; (p. 72)

— Review of Zebra and Other Stories Debra Adelaide , 2019 selected work short story
Debra Adelaide Zebra Andrew Fuhrmann , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 2-8 February 2019;

'You enter the hedge maze planted with lilly pilly shrubs. Dead end follows dead end as each twist and turn yields more of the same. You begin to get weary. And then there’s something remarkable. Right at the end of the labyrinth, waiting like an oracle or a punchline that baffles comprehension, you discover a live zebra calmly grazing, absolutely content and unexpected.'  (Introduction)

Fences and Core Myths David Haworth , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 409 2019; (p. 55)

'As the United States tears itself to pieces over a proposed wall, which has in recent months transmogrified into a steel fence, here in Australia we have no right to be smug or to rubberneck. After all, Australia loves its fences. Since it was first occupied as a penal colony, this land has been bisected by a seemingly endless series of enclosures, barricades, frontiers, and fences, including some of the longest in the world: the rabbit-proof fence in Western Australia; and the dingo fence in the Eastern states. Fences, both physical and symbolic, have long been used by our leaders to banish undesirables or to constrain their movement within acceptable boundaries. Various Australian governments have forcibly removed Indigenous Australians to reserves and missions, interned so-called ‘enemy aliens’ within camps during wartime, and detained those fleeing danger or tyranny abroad within remote and offshore prisons.' (Introduction)

The Hurt We Live among : Reading Zebra and Other Stories Jack Cameron Stanton , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , April 2019;

'Often, short story collections seem arbitrarily composed. They can feel tossed together in an ersatz attempt to be coherent while not adhering to an organising principle that makes them whole. Which says nothing about the quality of the stories in isolation, but is instead an observation of the lack of textual cohesion that plagues so many short-fiction collections.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 13 Nov 2019 07:48:21
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