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Issue Details: First known date: 2018... vol. 15 no. 4 2018 of New Writing : The International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing est. 2004 New Writing
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'As I write, we are preparing to hold the first national US nomadic creative writing symposium, entitled ‘Creative Writing Education Today’. The symposium will begin at the University of South Florida, and I am looking forward to joining New Writing Editorial Board member and colleague, Dianne Donnelly, in hosting this inaugural event.'  (Editorial summary)

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2018 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Grinding the Moor – Ideasthesia and Narrative, Julia Prendergast , single work criticism

'What is the relationship between the ideas that underlie narrative and the language used to convey those ideas? What modes of poiesis are involved? What are the dynamics of the conversion process? The concept of ideasthesia can be used to tackle these questions. This article investigates the concept of ideasthesia using Nikolić’s definition of the concept, which arises from the ‘Ancient Greek words idea (for concept) and aesthesis (for sensation). Hence […] the term ideasthesia [or] sensing concepts’ (Nikolić, D. 2016. ‘Ideasthesia and art.’ emphasis in original). Ideasthesia is a means for understanding writing process – a way of deconstructing the ways in which writers sense concepts (ideas) in metaphorical, associative and sensory ways. Narrative arises from everyday ideas that are subsequently transformed. This article reflects upon the process of writing the short story ‘Like Clay’, a story about a form of postpartum psychosis known as olfactory hallucination (Prendergast, J. 2015. ‘Like Clay.’ Island Literary Magazine. The article unpacks meta-level processes of association from a practice-based perspective. Tracking the use of connotative language, this article reflects upon the writing process: asking how an image might represent an idea that simmers beneath the surface.'  (Introduction)

(p. 416-432)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 16 Oct 2018 08:53:26
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