AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 5923064923783174297.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y separately published work icon My Country : Stories, Essays & Speeches selected work   short story   essay  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 My Country : Stories, Essays & Speeches
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'David Marr is the rarest of breeds: one of Australia’s most unflinching, forensic reporters of political controversy, and one of its most subtle and eloquent biographers. In Marr’s hands, those things we call reportage and commentary are elevated to artful and illuminating chronicles of our time.

Notes

  • Author's note: To my editors, goads and angels for forty-five years. Thank you.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Collingwood, Fitzroy - Collingwood area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Black Inc. , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 5923064923783174297.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 400p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 5 November 2018.

      ISBN: 9781760640804, 9781743820674

Works about this Work

Withering Wit and a Certain Hauteur Gerard Windsor , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12 January 2019; (p. 16)

— Review of My Country : Stories, Essays & Speeches David Marr , 2018 selected work short story essay

'David Marr’s voice is ubiquitous, at least within the purlieus of the liberal Left. It’s also unique; the cultivated accent of the WASP establishment (although Sydney’s Shore was ‘‘a rotten school’’), slightly breathy, energetic, lengthening and emphasising an abnormal number of words, supremely confident, without hesitation, punchy, colloquial, witty and frequently withering.' (Introduction)

'I Know My Country Now' : David Marr Reflects on Australia Glyn Davis , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 407 2018; (p. 9, 11)

'There was excitement. David Marr, newly appointed editor of the National Times at just thirty-three, had agreed to speak with politics students on campus. Volunteers were dispatched to buy the obligatory felafel and cheese, plastic cups, and cask wine, and at 3 pm the famous journalist arrived to address a small but enthusiastic group of undergraduates.' (Introduction)

David Marr My Country AF , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 24-30 November 2018;

'There was a time when a selection of essays, sketches, reviews and speeches by David Marr would have seemed less necessary than it does now. From his rookie days at The Bulletin onwards, Marr was one of those figures who seemed to speak for and to the broad and thoughtful Australian middle class. He served as an ordinary oracle for the constitutional liberalism and decency of the majority. The man reflected, though in more elegant prose than was perhaps deserved, just who we were as a people.' (Introduction)

Withering Wit and a Certain Hauteur Gerard Windsor , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12 January 2019; (p. 16)

— Review of My Country : Stories, Essays & Speeches David Marr , 2018 selected work short story essay

'David Marr’s voice is ubiquitous, at least within the purlieus of the liberal Left. It’s also unique; the cultivated accent of the WASP establishment (although Sydney’s Shore was ‘‘a rotten school’’), slightly breathy, energetic, lengthening and emphasising an abnormal number of words, supremely confident, without hesitation, punchy, colloquial, witty and frequently withering.' (Introduction)

David Marr My Country AF , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 24-30 November 2018;

'There was a time when a selection of essays, sketches, reviews and speeches by David Marr would have seemed less necessary than it does now. From his rookie days at The Bulletin onwards, Marr was one of those figures who seemed to speak for and to the broad and thoughtful Australian middle class. He served as an ordinary oracle for the constitutional liberalism and decency of the majority. The man reflected, though in more elegant prose than was perhaps deserved, just who we were as a people.' (Introduction)

'I Know My Country Now' : David Marr Reflects on Australia Glyn Davis , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 407 2018; (p. 9, 11)

'There was excitement. David Marr, newly appointed editor of the National Times at just thirty-three, had agreed to speak with politics students on campus. Volunteers were dispatched to buy the obligatory felafel and cheese, plastic cups, and cask wine, and at 3 pm the famous journalist arrived to address a small but enthusiastic group of undergraduates.' (Introduction)

Last amended 11 Dec 2018 10:25:08
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X