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form y separately published work icon Judy & Punch single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Judy & Punch
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When small-town puppeteer Punch accidentally kills his baby during a drinking binge, his wife Judy — having suffered a violent beating — teams up with a band of outcast heretics to enact revenge on Punch and the entire town of Seaside.'

Source: Screen Australia.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Domestic Drama with Male Violence and Superstition David Stratton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25 November 2019; (p. 15)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV

'As someone who grew up in England, I have vivid memories of the ­annual seaside holiday with my parents and the inevitable Punch and Judy puppet show on the beach. Punch originated in Italy (Puncinello) and by the time I encountered him, in post-war Britain, his “act” was pretty much set in stone. Armed with his “slapstick”, he would lash out at anyone, including the long-suffering Judy. Other characters routinely included the baby, the dog who steals Punch’s sausages, a policeman and, rather mysteriously, a ­crocodile. Audiences watched with a mixture of awe (at the artistry of the puppetry) and horror (at the violence and brutality). A typical audience of children watching a show, most of them clearly terrified, is seen at the conclusion of Australian writer-director Mirrah Foulkes’s ambitious first feature, Judy & Punch.' (Introduction)

Judy Packs Own Punch Philippa Hawker , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 November 2019; (p. 4)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV

'Mirrah Foulkes chose to base her first feature film on a famous puppet show, writes Philippa Hawker'

[Review] Judy and Punch Anwen Crawford , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 417 2019; (p. 66)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV
'The fictional town of Seaside is ‘nowhere near the sea’, state the opening credits of Judy and Punch. Fine, but where or even when this film is set remains a puzzle throughout. The two titular characters, puppeteers Judy (Mia Wasikowska) and Punch (Damon Herriman), speak with an Irish lilt. The rest of the townsfolk – who come bedecked in grimy pirate shirts and motley, corseted gowns – possess an array of Scottish and English accents. The film opens with the medieval spectacle of three accused witches being stoned to death, and yet Seaside also boasts a uniformed police constable. Enough eucalypts are glimpsed in the background to alert any attentive viewer to the fact that, wherever Seaside is meant to be, this film was shot in Australia – in Eltham, Victoria, as it happens. Yet no reference is made to Australia at any point.' (Introduction)
Actor Damon Herriman Steve Dow , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 23-29 November 2019;

'A screen actor since he was 10 years old, Damon Herriman is all too aware of the precarities in his line of work. He speaks to Steve Dow about the ups and downs of his career and his new film, Judy and Punch. “It has a dark fairytale vibe. You can watch Judy and Punch as an allegory or a feminist revenge tale, or you could watch it as a really entertaining fairytale fable, or both.”' (Introduction)

Mia Wasikowska on Judy & Punch and Gendered Violence : 'How Do You Break That Cycle?' Debbie Zhou (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 22 November 2019;

'The actor’s new film – a feminist take on the puppet show – is a dark revenge tale for the #MeToo age' 

[Review] Judy and Punch Anwen Crawford , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 417 2019; (p. 66)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV
'The fictional town of Seaside is ‘nowhere near the sea’, state the opening credits of Judy and Punch. Fine, but where or even when this film is set remains a puzzle throughout. The two titular characters, puppeteers Judy (Mia Wasikowska) and Punch (Damon Herriman), speak with an Irish lilt. The rest of the townsfolk – who come bedecked in grimy pirate shirts and motley, corseted gowns – possess an array of Scottish and English accents. The film opens with the medieval spectacle of three accused witches being stoned to death, and yet Seaside also boasts a uniformed police constable. Enough eucalypts are glimpsed in the background to alert any attentive viewer to the fact that, wherever Seaside is meant to be, this film was shot in Australia – in Eltham, Victoria, as it happens. Yet no reference is made to Australia at any point.' (Introduction)
Judy Packs Own Punch Philippa Hawker , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 November 2019; (p. 4)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV

'Mirrah Foulkes chose to base her first feature film on a famous puppet show, writes Philippa Hawker'

Domestic Drama with Male Violence and Superstition David Stratton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25 November 2019; (p. 15)

— Review of Judy & Punch Mirrah Foulkes , 2019 single work film/TV

'As someone who grew up in England, I have vivid memories of the ­annual seaside holiday with my parents and the inevitable Punch and Judy puppet show on the beach. Punch originated in Italy (Puncinello) and by the time I encountered him, in post-war Britain, his “act” was pretty much set in stone. Armed with his “slapstick”, he would lash out at anyone, including the long-suffering Judy. Other characters routinely included the baby, the dog who steals Punch’s sausages, a policeman and, rather mysteriously, a ­crocodile. Audiences watched with a mixture of awe (at the artistry of the puppetry) and horror (at the violence and brutality). A typical audience of children watching a show, most of them clearly terrified, is seen at the conclusion of Australian writer-director Mirrah Foulkes’s ambitious first feature, Judy & Punch.' (Introduction)

Aussies To Rip In Big Time At Sundance Erin Free , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 29 November 2018;
2019’s Most Anticipated Movies Dov Kornits , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 26 December 2018;
Get Excited…The Sydney Film Festival Programme Has Dropped 2019 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 8 May 2019;
Mirrah Foulkes : Proud as Punch Christine Westwood , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 13 May 2019;
Mia Wasikowska on Judy & Punch and Gendered Violence : 'How Do You Break That Cycle?' Debbie Zhou (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 22 November 2019;

'The actor’s new film – a feminist take on the puppet show – is a dark revenge tale for the #MeToo age' 

Last amended 16 Apr 2020 09:50:09
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