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y separately published work icon States of Poetry - Tasmania anthology   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 States of Poetry - Tasmania
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Series Two of the Tasmanian States of Poetry anthology is edited by Sarah Day and features poems by Christiane Conésa-Bostock, James Charlton, Jim Everett-pularia meenamatta, Anne Kellas, Gina Mercer, and Ben Walter.' (Introduction)

Contents

* Contents derived from the Southbank, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,:ABR Publications , 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
State Editor's Introduction, Sarah Day , single work essay

'A. E. Houseman memorably said: I could no more define poetry than a terrier can define a rat. It’s not an easy matter to justify one’s decisions when faced with numerous poems from which to make a limited selection. There’s no programmatic guide to what makes a poem successful although the impact of a good poem is something we all know and recognise. Generally it has something to do with registering a sense of shock – it might be the shock of the new, unexpected or strange, or it might be the shock of the familiar – it can take one off guard to be confronted by what one knows but didn’t know one knew. And what creates the shock? This is different with every poem. It may be linguistic – the relationship between the words or the acoustics of words and lines; it may be the imagery or information or impressions communicated; it may be the tensions and dynamics set up between all or some of these elements that results in a poetic imperative. The ineffable subtleties at work in a poem are endlessly unpredictable; it’s that unpredictability that makes poetry so compelling. You never know in what way a poem is going to reach you.' (Introduction)

How to Get Rid of the Layer of Snowi"First, you have to get rid of the layer of snow.", Anne Kellas , single work poetry
Probablyi"I'll go that way, by sea", Anne Kellas , single work poetry
As You Left Home One Winter's Nighti"It’s dawn but it’s dark.", Anne Kellas , single work poetry
The Findingi"Here,", Anne Kellas , single work poetry
Travelling to My Mother Last Centuryi"I step in a taxi, again.", Anne Kellas , single work poetry
So Many Throatsi"There is speech everywhere:", James Charlton , single work poetry
Scatomanceri"We poke apart devil scats.", James Charlton , single work poetry
Thisi"We invent the colour ‘blue’", James Charlton , single work poetry
Wonderi"The failed money-fix of the 1980s:", James Charlton , single work poetry
Choir Practicei"A priest undoes his belt.", James Charlton , single work poetry
Blood Lusti"Australians you now call yourselves,", Jim Everett , single work poetry
Ghost Nets and Waterlinesi"Our Earth Mother cries when the nets are set adrift", Jim Everett , single work poetry
On the Road with Bucki"one day I was drivin' down with Buck Brown along the coast", Jim Pura-lia Meenamatla Everette , single work poetry
From the Outsidei"Okay, I’m from the outside", Jim Everett , single work poetry
Extracts from "The Dictionary Aquatici"Distinctive mating call of wild creeks. Rarely heard in cities where this species has been", Gina Mercer , single work poetry

This poem is in ten titled parts.

Rapidesi"The light gets tired, he writes, and I wonder if water, too, can get weary with all that", Gina Mercer , single work poetry
My First Ever Selfiei"Me alongside that world-famous celebrity", Gina Mercer , single work poetry
Waking up Poemi"Forget", Gina Mercer , single work poetry
After, There Are the Birdsi"He sends me photos", Gina Mercer , single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Southbank, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: ABR Publications , 2017 .
      Link: 14033992Web Resource Sighted: 01/06/2018
      Series: y separately published work icon States of Poetry : Series Two Southbank : ABR Publications , 2017 11188047 2017 series - publisher poetry

      'States of Poetry – a major national resource – is the first online poetry anthology to devote equal space to each state and the ACT. The aim is to highlight the quality and diversity of contemporary Australian poetry. Funded by Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund, States of Poetry is federally arranged. A senior poet active in the state selects six local poets, with an emphasis (not exclusive) on early- and mid-career writers and those still active in the poetry scene. Each year the cohort of poets will be completely different, offering a different snapshot of the poetry being written and published in each state. The individual state/territory anthologies appear free online, with introductions from the state editor, biographies, recordings, and brief remarks from some of the featured poets. Some of the poems later appear in the print magazine.' (Introduction)

Works about this Work

State Editor's Introduction Sarah Day , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: States of Poetry - Tasmania 2017;

'A. E. Houseman memorably said: I could no more define poetry than a terrier can define a rat. It’s not an easy matter to justify one’s decisions when faced with numerous poems from which to make a limited selection. There’s no programmatic guide to what makes a poem successful although the impact of a good poem is something we all know and recognise. Generally it has something to do with registering a sense of shock – it might be the shock of the new, unexpected or strange, or it might be the shock of the familiar – it can take one off guard to be confronted by what one knows but didn’t know one knew. And what creates the shock? This is different with every poem. It may be linguistic – the relationship between the words or the acoustics of words and lines; it may be the imagery or information or impressions communicated; it may be the tensions and dynamics set up between all or some of these elements that results in a poetic imperative. The ineffable subtleties at work in a poem are endlessly unpredictable; it’s that unpredictability that makes poetry so compelling. You never know in what way a poem is going to reach you.' (Introduction)

State Editor's Introduction Sarah Day , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: States of Poetry - Tasmania 2017;

'A. E. Houseman memorably said: I could no more define poetry than a terrier can define a rat. It’s not an easy matter to justify one’s decisions when faced with numerous poems from which to make a limited selection. There’s no programmatic guide to what makes a poem successful although the impact of a good poem is something we all know and recognise. Generally it has something to do with registering a sense of shock – it might be the shock of the new, unexpected or strange, or it might be the shock of the familiar – it can take one off guard to be confronted by what one knows but didn’t know one knew. And what creates the shock? This is different with every poem. It may be linguistic – the relationship between the words or the acoustics of words and lines; it may be the imagery or information or impressions communicated; it may be the tensions and dynamics set up between all or some of these elements that results in a poetic imperative. The ineffable subtleties at work in a poem are endlessly unpredictable; it’s that unpredictability that makes poetry so compelling. You never know in what way a poem is going to reach you.' (Introduction)

Last amended 1 Jun 2018 13:38:44
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