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Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y separately published work icon Preservation single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Preservation
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'1797. ON a beach not far from the isolated settlement of Sydney, a fishing boat picks up three shipwreck survivors, distressed and terribly injured. They have walked hundreds of miles across a landscape whose features— and inhabitants—they have no way of comprehending. They have lost fourteen companions along the way. Their accounts of the ordeal are evasive.

'It is Lieutenant Joshua Grayling’s task to investigate the story. Gradually he comes to realise that those fourteen deaths were contrived by one calculating mind. And as the full horror of the men’s journey emerges, he begins to wonder whether the ruthless killer now at large in the infant colony poses a danger to his own family.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Based on the story of the wreck of the Sydney Cove.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 8442914789685305840.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 400p.p.
      Reprinted: 2019 (paperback)
      Note/s:
      • Published November 2018.

      ISBN: 9781925773125, 9781925774030, 9781925773965 (pbk), 9781925774030 (ebk)

Other Formats

Works about this Work

Survival James Bradley , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 407 2018; (p. 39-40)

'On 15 May 1797 a fishing boat passing Wattamolla, in what is now Sydney’s Royal National Park, spotted three men on the beach. Rescued and returned to Sydney, the trio – tea merchant and supercargo William Clarke, sailor John Bennet, and Clarke’s lascar manservant, Srinivas – told an extraordinary story. After their ship, the Sydney Cove, was wrecked on Preservation Island in Bass Strait, they, along with fourteen other men, had set off in a longboat, hoping to fetch help for the other survivors. But when the longboat was also wrecked off the Ninety Mile Beach along Victoria, the survivors chose to do the only thing left open to them: follow the coast north on foot until they found help.'  (Introduction)

Jock Serong Preservation CR , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 17-23 November 2018;

'The Sydney Cove has the mixed distinction of being among the first ships wrecked on Australia’s east coast; it was on its way from Calcutta to Port Jackson in 1797 when it wrecked on an island – now called Preservation Island – in Bass Strait. Seventeen men survived and set off in the ship’s longboat to Port Jackson, on the way to which they wrecked again, this time on the mainland, leaving them few choices but to walk the 600-plus kilometres to Sydney from Ninety Mile Beach. Three survivors – a British merchant, a Scottish merchant and one Indian lascar – made it to Sydney, where, in this fourth novel by Jock Serong, those able to communicate are interrogated by Lieutenant Joshua Grayling, who is tasked with solving the many mysteries their bodies bear. One of them has a broken nose. Another has been speared through both hands.' (Introduction)

Jock Serong Preservation CR , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 17-23 November 2018;

'The Sydney Cove has the mixed distinction of being among the first ships wrecked on Australia’s east coast; it was on its way from Calcutta to Port Jackson in 1797 when it wrecked on an island – now called Preservation Island – in Bass Strait. Seventeen men survived and set off in the ship’s longboat to Port Jackson, on the way to which they wrecked again, this time on the mainland, leaving them few choices but to walk the 600-plus kilometres to Sydney from Ninety Mile Beach. Three survivors – a British merchant, a Scottish merchant and one Indian lascar – made it to Sydney, where, in this fourth novel by Jock Serong, those able to communicate are interrogated by Lieutenant Joshua Grayling, who is tasked with solving the many mysteries their bodies bear. One of them has a broken nose. Another has been speared through both hands.' (Introduction)

Survival James Bradley , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 407 2018; (p. 39-40)

'On 15 May 1797 a fishing boat passing Wattamolla, in what is now Sydney’s Royal National Park, spotted three men on the beach. Rescued and returned to Sydney, the trio – tea merchant and supercargo William Clarke, sailor John Bennet, and Clarke’s lascar manservant, Srinivas – told an extraordinary story. After their ship, the Sydney Cove, was wrecked on Preservation Island in Bass Strait, they, along with fourteen other men, had set off in a longboat, hoping to fetch help for the other survivors. But when the longboat was also wrecked off the Ninety Mile Beach along Victoria, the survivors chose to do the only thing left open to them: follow the coast north on foot until they found help.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 8 Oct 2019 15:55:37
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