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Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Recirculating Songs : Revitalising the Singing Practices of Indigenous Australia
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Indigenous communities across Australia are currently experiencing a high level of renewed interest in their song traditions as the present generation of songmen and songwomen take on the responsibilities of their ancestors. Recirculating songs gives voice to these contemporary performers, and looks at the issues they face in learning and passing on their ancestral musical practices in the 21st century. This book is the first of its kind to be devoted specifically to the strategies Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are adopting to keep their traditional music alive and strong. At the same time, it introduces the wider public to Australia's rich Indigenous musical heritage, through a series of case studies focused on particular communities or regions. In some parts of the country, where the transmission of musical knowledge from generation to generation has been interrupted, the process of revitalising the song traditions relies, to varying degrees, on historic recordings and documents. So the book also covers the techniques being adopted to access these resources and make them available for contemporary use by Indigenous musicians. In this multi-authored volume, Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors investigate these issues in locations across Australia, from the south-west tip to the Torres Strait, from the Tiwi Islands to Tasmania. The book takes us on a journey through various song styles and performance practices, from dream songs of the Hunter Valley to Torres Strait Island hymns, from 19th century recordings of Tasmanian singing to classroom musical activities in the Kimberley. Some chapters, such as those focused on communities in the Gulf of Carpentaria and Arnhem Land, also devote specific attention to Aboriginal dance, and to the music that accompanies it. In all of these varied situations, Indigenous Australians are striving to ensure that the store of traditional knowledge contained in the ancestral song repertoires continue to be passed on. Recirculating Songs documents their efforts and also provides audio and video examples via QR codes. The book is rich with new information, insights and inspiration for Indigenous people and communities, researchers and educators, and anyone interested in the music of Indigenous Australia.'  (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Table of Contents 

    • Introduction : everything got a song /​ Jim Wafer
    • Maaya waab (play with sound) : song language and spoken language in the south-west of Western Australia /​ Clint Bracknell
    • Thabi returns: the use of digital resources to recirculate and revitalise Thabi songs in the west Pilbara /​ Sally Treloyn and Andrew Morumburri Dowding
    • Ngadiji: for women and men also. A song and dance continuing to be performed by the Yanyuwa of the Gulf area of the Northern Territory /​ Margaret Sharpe
    • Finding Arrernte songs /​ Myfany Turpin
    • Lone singers : the others have all gone /​ Luise Hercus and Grace Koch
    • Songs performed by Willie Rookwood at Woorabinda in 1965 /​ Mary Laughren, Myfany Turpin and Gemma Turner
    • A survey of traditional south-eastern Australian Indigenous music /​ Barry McDonald
    • Applying multilingual knowledge to decipher an historical song of change /​ Raymond Kelly and Jean Harkins
    • Ghost-writing for Wulatji: incubation and "re-dreaming" as song revitalisation practices /​ Jim Wafer
    • Finding laka for burdal: song revitalisation at Mornington Island over the past 40 years /​ Cassy Nancarrow and Peter Cleary
    • Maintaining song traditions and languages together at Warruwi (western Arnhem Land) /​ Reuben Brown, David Manmurulu, Jenny Manmurulu, Isabel O'Keeffe and Ruth Singer
    • Songs that keep ancestral languages alive : a Marrku songset from western Arnhem Land /​ Reuben Brown and Nicholas Evans
    • Singing with the ancestors : musical conversations with archived ethnographic recordings /​ Genevieve Campbell
    • Children, knowledge, country : child and youth-based approaches to revitalising musical traditions in the Kimberley /​ Andrea Emberley, Sally Treloyn and Rona Googninda Charles
    • Revitalising Meriam Mir through sacred song /​ Helen Fairweather and Philip Matthias with Toby Whaleboat
    • Recovering musical data from colonial era transcriptions of Indigenous songs : some practical considerations /​ Graeme Skinner
    • A checklist of colonial era musical transcriptions of Australian Indigenous songs /​ Graeme Skinner and Jim Wafe

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Hamilton, Hamilton - Mayfield area, Newcastle, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,: Hunter Press , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 7263856513397253993.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 424p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 5th December 2017
         

      • Includes sound and video encoded examples of songs. Includes index. Includes bibliographical references.

         

      ISBN: 9780994586315

Works about this Work

[Review] Recirculating Songs: Revitalising the Singing Practices of Indigenous Australia Kathryn Wells , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2018; (p. 80-83)

— Review of Recirculating Songs : Revitalising the Singing Practices of Indigenous Australia 2017 anthology criticism

'The study of Australian Indigenous songs in the past two decades has moved beyond linguistic and musicological studies to interdisciplinary collaborations with Indigenous song men and women. This reciprocal engagement between academics and singers within their communities has revealed more of the multi-purpose nature of Indigenous song traditions and customs. Song underscores melodic and rhythmic patterns in music and dance, gives us insight into unique song language and, at the same time, embodies local identity, belonging to place and ownership of stories.'  (Introduction)

[Review] Recirculating Songs: Revitalising the Singing Practices of Indigenous Australia Kathryn Wells , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2018; (p. 80-83)

— Review of Recirculating Songs : Revitalising the Singing Practices of Indigenous Australia 2017 anthology criticism

'The study of Australian Indigenous songs in the past two decades has moved beyond linguistic and musicological studies to interdisciplinary collaborations with Indigenous song men and women. This reciprocal engagement between academics and singers within their communities has revealed more of the multi-purpose nature of Indigenous song traditions and customs. Song underscores melodic and rhythmic patterns in music and dance, gives us insight into unique song language and, at the same time, embodies local identity, belonging to place and ownership of stories.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 2 Mar 2018 10:31:00
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