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y separately published work icon Sentences from the Archive selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Sentences from the Archive
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Jen Webb’s new collection is a series of striking prose poems that explore the ways in which personal crises and memories might be re-examined through the elusive concept of the archive. How, she asks, might we construct a personal archive to ‘make sense of the past in the work of facing and building the future’? Each of these finely wrought poems is a record of life lived through significant moments.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Kambah, Tuggeranong area, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Recent Work Press , 2016 .
      image of person or book cover 466454640537889564.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 66p.
      Note/s:
      • Published November 2016

      ISBN: 9780995353800

Works about this Work

Annelise Roberts Reviews Sentences from the Archive by Jen Webb Annelise Roberts , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , December no. 21 2017;

'“I peeled apples and sliced them finger-nail deep, waking you with their scent” (1): Jen Webb’s Sentences from the Archive (Recent Work Press, 2016) begins with the pastel erotic vignette ‘Outside the Orchard’. It’s like a favourite private memory that gets indulgently recycled from time to time. “The astringent bite. Fluid in the mouth. Green skin, spiralling a green S across the lawn.” (1) But by the third poem ‘The heart of the sea’, the green is muddied, the tone becomes urgent, and the murmur of inner experience is abandoned for a collective voice: “The navy arrived in fast boats, urging us to board, guaranteeing our lives….” (3) The tense shifts midpoint to a present which seems to express a kind of futility, like the futility of prediction: “Tonight we wait, hand in hand, standing on the deck. In the distance we see it draw nearer. I think that it’s a rainstorm, but someone says no, it’s angels. Someone else says it is the herald of our end.” (3)' (Introduction)

Review Short: Jen Webb’s Sentences from the Archive John Foulcher , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 May vol. 80 no. 2017;

'In 2011, Ginninderra Press released The Indigo Book of Australian Prose Poems, edited by Canberra writer Michael Byrne. While many of the country’s most accomplished poets were represented there, the book’s reception was somewhat muted. Indeed, prose poetry invites a certain amount of suspicion. While we’re happy to concede that many devices and techniques which would have been definitional of poetry a couple of centuries ago no longer do so, we’re reluctant to jettison lineation.' (Introduction)

Review Short: Jen Webb’s Sentences from the Archive John Foulcher , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 May vol. 80 no. 2017;

'In 2011, Ginninderra Press released The Indigo Book of Australian Prose Poems, edited by Canberra writer Michael Byrne. While many of the country’s most accomplished poets were represented there, the book’s reception was somewhat muted. Indeed, prose poetry invites a certain amount of suspicion. While we’re happy to concede that many devices and techniques which would have been definitional of poetry a couple of centuries ago no longer do so, we’re reluctant to jettison lineation.' (Introduction)

Annelise Roberts Reviews Sentences from the Archive by Jen Webb Annelise Roberts , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , December no. 21 2017;

'“I peeled apples and sliced them finger-nail deep, waking you with their scent” (1): Jen Webb’s Sentences from the Archive (Recent Work Press, 2016) begins with the pastel erotic vignette ‘Outside the Orchard’. It’s like a favourite private memory that gets indulgently recycled from time to time. “The astringent bite. Fluid in the mouth. Green skin, spiralling a green S across the lawn.” (1) But by the third poem ‘The heart of the sea’, the green is muddied, the tone becomes urgent, and the murmur of inner experience is abandoned for a collective voice: “The navy arrived in fast boats, urging us to board, guaranteeing our lives….” (3) The tense shifts midpoint to a present which seems to express a kind of futility, like the futility of prediction: “Tonight we wait, hand in hand, standing on the deck. In the distance we see it draw nearer. I think that it’s a rainstorm, but someone says no, it’s angels. Someone else says it is the herald of our end.” (3)' (Introduction)

Last amended 25 Aug 2017 07:22:43
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