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Image courtesy of publisher's website.
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Paradise in Chains : The Bounty Mutiny and the Founding of Australia
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The story of the mutiny of the Bounty and William Bligh and his men's survival on the open ocean has become the stuff of legend. But Bligh's escape was not the only open-boat journey in that era of British colonization. Nine convicts from the Australian penal colony also traveled across uncharted seas to land at the same Pacific port Bligh reached only months before. This meticulously researched dual narrative of survival shows how these seemingly utopian lands became a place where mutineers, convicts, and eventually the natives themselves, were chained.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 55057620417398792.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Note/s:
      • To be published November 2017.

      ISBN: 9781632866103

Works about this Work

History : Paradise in Chains Margarette Lincoln , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 10 April 2018;

'Well-timed for commemorations of the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s departure on his first voyage to the Pacific in 1768, Diana Preston’s generously illustrated book tells the story of Britain’s early contact with Pacific Islanders. The title does not do her book justice: she does more than link the Bounty mutiny to the founding of Australia. She uses three gruelling open-boat voyages, well reported in their time, to open up Pacific history: William Bligh’s voyage to Timor after the Bounty mutiny in 1789, when he navigated loyal crew members some 3,600 nautical miles to safety; the open-boat voyage of survivors of the Pandora, sent to capture the Bounty mutineers on Tahiti but wrecked in 1791; and the little-known voyage from Port Jackson to Timor, that same year, of nine prisoners escaping Australia’s first penal colony. The convicts included Mary Bryant, originally from a Cornish fishing village, who took…'  (Introduction)

History : Paradise in Chains Margarette Lincoln , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 10 April 2018;

'Well-timed for commemorations of the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s departure on his first voyage to the Pacific in 1768, Diana Preston’s generously illustrated book tells the story of Britain’s early contact with Pacific Islanders. The title does not do her book justice: she does more than link the Bounty mutiny to the founding of Australia. She uses three gruelling open-boat voyages, well reported in their time, to open up Pacific history: William Bligh’s voyage to Timor after the Bounty mutiny in 1789, when he navigated loyal crew members some 3,600 nautical miles to safety; the open-boat voyage of survivors of the Pandora, sent to capture the Bounty mutineers on Tahiti but wrecked in 1791; and the little-known voyage from Port Jackson to Timor, that same year, of nine prisoners escaping Australia’s first penal colony. The convicts included Mary Bryant, originally from a Cornish fishing village, who took…'  (Introduction)

Last amended 25 Jan 2018 09:01:05
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