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y separately published work icon Griffith Review periodical issue  
Alternative title: State of Hope
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... no. 55 2017 of Griffith Review est. 2003- Griffith Review
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'As the industrial model that shaped twentieth-century South Australia is replaced by an uncertain future, now more than ever the state needs to draw on the strengths of its past in order to move ahead.

'South Australia has always demonstrated a willingness to challenge prevailing sentiments, experiment, boldly innovate and take a national lead – and as a result has produced a disproportionate number of leaders in business, science, the arts and public policy.

'Now, on the cusp of change, the state needs to draw on its talent for experiment and innovation in order to thrive in an increasingly competitive world. State of Hope explores the economic, social, environmental and cultural challenges facing South Australia, and the possibilities of renewal and revitalisation. It celebrates the unselfconscious willingness that hope enables.

'State of Hope is co-edited by Julianne Schultz and Patrick Allington. ' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Includes Lost Geographies - a photo essay by Annette Willis

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Born of Reform : Holding Faith in Hope, Julianne Schultz , single work essay

The Reform Club, the imposing Palazzo-style structure on Pall Mall, one of London’s grandest thoroughfares, has entered the popular imagination as the

quintessential gentleman’s club. Its camera-ready elegance – the soaring atrium, sweeping staircases and cosy parlours – has given the private club an unusually

public life.' (Introduction)

(p. 7-9)
So Dry a Homeland : A Thirst for Life Quenched, a New Thirst for Answers, Robyn Archer , single work essay
'There are still some hot summer nights when I can tool around Adelaide with the windows down and feel like a teenager on the hunt. It’s 30 degrees at eight in the evening, and down at the beach people are queuing for ice-cream. Henley Square’s pumpin’ and hoons are chuggin’ the strip.' (Introduction)
(p. 11-18)
Stormy Times : Living with Uncertainty, John Spoehr , single work essay
'Abstract: In September 2016, South Australia was buffeted by the most ferocious storm in half a century. Apocalyptic clouds gathered as thousands of lightning strikes hit the saturated landscape. The nation watched the unfolding crisis as an intense low-pressure system, two tornadoes, flooding rains and high tides demonstrated nature's raw and unforgiving energy. Cyclonic winds felled transmission towers in the north, triggering a blackout that plunged the state into darkness. Meanwhile, torrential rains threatened flash flooding, provoking two days of collective trepidation as swollen rivers broke their banks, destroying crops and inundating houses.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 19-31)
Fly In, Fly Far Away : Life Together, at a Distance, Tracy Crisp , single work autobiography
'The argument in the car starts the way it always does. One brother's arm is around the other's shoulders, the two are wrestling, both are laughing and then the eldest uses too much force, the youngest screams and from the front seat I swear. It's as if it has been scripted, except...' (Publication abstract)
(p. 32-36)
Dispatches from the Radical Centre, Dennis Atkins , single work essay
'South Australians have a reputation for being a little bit up themselves. They speak with soft-toned vowels. They boast of their free-settler status, pride themselves as being the progressive heart of the nation and proclaim dominance in the arts, viticulture and cuisine. In Queensland, which is Australia's yin to the yang of South Australia, they say there's no snob like a South Australian snob. Through this mix of pride and suffering, the peers down long noses, South Australians don't worry too much, unless you talk to them about their economy. That's when they bristle, because it's always been a fragile entity - always looking for the next big project, the next big thing to carry their social and artistic ambitions into the future.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 37-43)
Waiting for the Sun : Port Augusta's Search for a Post-coal Identity, Michael Dulaney , single work essay
'Even though I have been lost in the pop-culture megastores of Tokyo, and touched the bronze horns of the Wall Street bull, I never truly appreciated the redemptive power of capitalism until I visited an auction of equipment from a decommissioned coal-power station. It was where I learned there is a legitimate market for 3,000-horsepower motors and semi-used spools of insulated cable. An auctioneer told me a bright-red fire door - ten feet by twelve feet of tempered steel clad with pounded aluminium - was to be repurposed as the entrance to someone's 'man cave'. Whoever had the unenviable job of cataloguing this industrial detritus had alleviated his or her boredom by coming up with sarcastic descriptions for some of the more underwhelming items: 'Divorce Pack' (three fridges, a microwave, two heaters and a cabinet); 'The Trap!!' (a mysterious steel cage contraption); and 'quantity grease tins on wall'. All of this was being sold to clear the way for the demolition of Alinta Energy's brown-coal plant at Port Augusta, a dirty old giant of industry that had sat on the saltbush tip of the Spencer Gulf for six decades. We had come here on a cold Tuesday morning to wander through the carcass of the power plant, which had incinerated enough little brown rocks to power a few thousand homes for something like 65 million hours, and either pay our respects or make out like carrion. One guy, David, whose father had worked at the power station for two decades, had brought his camera to document this piece of local and family history.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 44-53)
In the Dark : When 'Truthiness' Eclipses the Truth, Tory Shepherd , single work essay
'A celebrity chef declares dairy causes osteoporosis, and cholesterol medication is bad. Parents shy away from giving their children life-saving vaccinations. People are stringing crystals around their neck, then necking kale juice on the way to the chiropractors to have their neck cricks cracked.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 54-62)
Diminishing City : Hope, Despair and Whyalla, Peter Stanley , single work essay
'Exactly fifty years ago, in the spring of 1966, my family left the Pennington Migrant Centre in Adelaide to drive up Highway 1 to Whyalla. Our destination, BHP's Milpara hostel, was a full day's journey away in a second-hand faded blue Ford Zephyr. As recently arrived migrants from Britain, the drive would take us into an utterly unfamiliar landscape: the red-soil and saltbush country of South Australia's upper Eyre Peninsula.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 63-74)
Bigger Than Heaven : The Past Remembered, Forgotten, Unmade, Shannon Burns , single work autobiography
'I recall very little about myself before the age of six. I possess no photographs to jolt the hidden memories, and those few relatives I see at birthday and Christmas celebrations have only the faintest sense of what I was like as a boy. No baby mementos; nothing of the toddler; no kindergarten tokens or pre-school art works; no school portraits or athletics day medals; no locks of hair, first teeth, first boots; no record of first words or cherished toys; and few revealing anecdotes. As I sit to write these first lines, my inner archive is almost blank as well. There are only a handful of images left over: small, discontinuous fragments, which may or may not be authentic residual traces of an otherwise forgotten landscape.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 75-84)
From the Southi"What is the smoke?", Jill Jones , single work poetry (p. 85)
Adelaide Detours, Jill Jones , sequence poetry (p. 85-91)
Clipsal Interludioi"Mosquito racing cars", Jill Jones , single work poetry (p. 86-87)
Early Thoughts while Turning Onto Anzac Highway on 14th September 2015i"Stuck at lights at Anzac Highway, hello Le Cornu corner", Jill Jones , single work poetry (p. 87-88)
Driving through Dulwichi"Looking along the city plain", Jill Jones , single work poetry (p. 89)
Murray Andantei"The night fills with Bach", Jill Jones , single work poetry (p. 89-91)
Dunstan, Christies and Me : Growing up in the 'Athens of the South', Christine Wallace , single work autobiography
'Adelaide's golden age began when the Beatles flew into town on 12 June 1964, electrifying the citizenry out of their country-town torpor into a screaming mass on the streets. It ended when a dressing-gowned Don Dunstan resigned office on 15 February 1979, the last day of the most exciting state government Australia has ever seen. I spent most of that period in South Australia's excellent state education system, basking in the glow of a premier who seemingly made the earth move and stars pan gloriously across the heavens in a small city that, for once in its life, felt like the very centre of the universe. No joke.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 92-102)
Radical Roots in Fiji : The Impact of Colonialism on Don Dunstan, Angela Woollacott , single work essay
'Abstract: SOUTH AUSTRALIA'S REPUTATION for progressive reform extends back to its origins in Edward Gibbon Wakefield's scheme for imperial systematic colonisation. Wakefield's grand plans, which inspired followers and shaped several colonies in Australasia, aimed to rid Australia of convict transportation and to assist respectable free settlers. While land policy would limit the expansion of the frontier and regulate class relationships, those who worked hard would be able to acquire land, and settlers would have a voice in the framing of their laws. Wakefield's scheme was born in the milieu of early nineteenth-century British philosophical radicalism. Jeremy Bentham died before South Australia was settled, but he was a keen supporter of its planning, and suggested that it be named to reflect its radical promise: 'Felicia', 'Felicitania' or 'Liberia'. Regardless of just how well the state has lived up to those early rosy hopes, its sense of reformist exceptionalism has been woven into its history. One of its most important political leaders, Don Dunstan, the democratic socialist and nationally influential premier from 1967-68 and 1970-79, self-consciously adopted this tradition by titling his 1981 political memoirs Felicia.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 103-112)
The Palais, Anna Goldsworthy , single work short story
'When Ruby first moves to town she stays with the Miss Wrights on Prospect Road, on the recommendation of her Aunt Maude. Aunt Maude is a frequent visitor, and if Ruby is spending the weekend in town, she joins them in the parlour for afternoon tea. The Miss Wrights have a horror of drafts, of catching a chill on the kidneys, but the atmosphere in the parlour - with the heavy drapes drawn to protect the furniture - is the closest of all. Occasionally a ray of light steals through a gap in the curtains, illuminating the room like a diver's torch. Cat dander glitters and somersaults in the air like plankton...' (Publication abstract)
(p. 113-123)
Behind Every Story : Recovering the Past, Kerryn Goldsworthy , single work essay

'It may not be the best painting in the Art Gallery of South Australia, and it may not be the most valuable. But one of the gallery's most historically significant paintings is an enormous canvas by the nineteenth-century Adelaide artist Charles Hill, entitled The Proclamation of South Australia 1836. Painted decades after the fact, it shows the gathering of South Australia's earliest white settlers near the beach at Glenelg, all still living in tents and all come to hear the Proclamation. This is a real historical document, one that officially announced to the settlers that, with the arrival of His Excellency the Governor on this hot Adelaide day aboard the Buffalo, the colonial government of His Majesty's new province had been formally established. Subsequently published in the second issue of the South Australian Gazette and Colonial Register, on 3 June 1837, the Proclamation exhorted them:

...to conduct themselves on all occasions with order and quietness, duly to respect the laws, and by a course of industry and sobriety, by the practice of sound morality and a strict observance of the Ordinances of Religion, to prove themselves worthy to be the Founders of a great and free Colony.' (Publication abstract)

(p. 124-134)
Remembering Roxby Downs : Mythology, Mining and the Latent Power of Archives, Peter Sutton , single work essay
'In 1842, the mainly British and German settlers who had arrived en masse at the beginning of South Australia's colonial history six years earlier were given a huge economic surprise. The colonists, largely farmers, artisans and public servants and their dependents, learnt of the discovery of copper ore at Kapunda. Kapunda was only eighty kilometres from the colonial capital of Adelaide. Three years later, the world-renowned bonanza copper lode at Burra was discovered. Other South Australian copper mines were to follow, and they gave the economy a huge stimulus by high-yield, low-cost mining within workable distances from a port. Even though mineral exploration was on the colony's drawing board from 1835, South Australia was largely intended to be founded on the steady labour of cropping and pastoralism and reaping the fruits of the sea. Suddenly, luck was a key player too.' (Publication abstract)
(p. 135-159)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'Griffith Review 55 : State of Hope' Edited by Julianne Schultz and Patrick Allington Robert Crocker , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 392 2017;
'South Australia remains something of a national contradiction in terms, and this is brought out well in this richly diverse and varied collection of essays and stories. Shifting its focus away from Adelaide to many of South Australia’s older industrial and pre-industrial centres, including Whyalla, Port Augusta, the Riverland, and Clare, Griffith Review’s State of Hope is no tourist guide and does not contain any particularly useful historical overview for those who might want one. However, the editors ask an important question which those living in other states often want to know: what makes South Australia so different? The answers, and there are many, come together piece by piece in the reading of this collection. Few readers will be left unrewarded by at least some of the assembled guests at this particular literary dinner party.' (Introduction)
'Griffith Review 55 : State of Hope' Edited by Julianne Schultz and Patrick Allington Robert Crocker , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 392 2017;
'South Australia remains something of a national contradiction in terms, and this is brought out well in this richly diverse and varied collection of essays and stories. Shifting its focus away from Adelaide to many of South Australia’s older industrial and pre-industrial centres, including Whyalla, Port Augusta, the Riverland, and Clare, Griffith Review’s State of Hope is no tourist guide and does not contain any particularly useful historical overview for those who might want one. However, the editors ask an important question which those living in other states often want to know: what makes South Australia so different? The answers, and there are many, come together piece by piece in the reading of this collection. Few readers will be left unrewarded by at least some of the assembled guests at this particular literary dinner party.' (Introduction)
Last amended 4 May 2018 07:14:04
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