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Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 What Happens When You Tell Somebody Else's Story?
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Meanjin Telling Someone Else's Story vol. 75 no. 4 Summer 2016 10855789 2016 periodical issue

    'Stories can have a determining power, the authority of the assumed and accepted narrative.

    'We all have our own of course, and perhaps the capacity to imagine the stories of hypothetical others. In everyday life that might pass for empathy; in literature it can carry an edge of privilege and controversy. And in fact? In non-fiction?

    'In this edition, a timely exploration framed by that great Australian woman of letters Alexis Wright, a long musing on the often vexed intersections between our first peoples and the narrative that explains and explores the Indigenous position in modern Australia. Whose stories are these to tell? Who owns this continuing tale?' (Editorial introduction)

    2016
    pg. 58-76

Works about this Work

Defying the Moment Beejay Silcox , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 400 2018; (p. 14, 16-17, 19)

'Moments began as medieval measures, the time it took for a sundial’s blade of shadow to shift – ninety seconds or so, depending on the season. A slice of sunlight. A moment now carries cultural as well as temporal weight. A slice of spotlight. Increasingly, we speak of our present as a moment, as if its minutes are sprung like an ontological mousetrap, primed to snap. As Sam Anderson writes in The New York Times: ‘No nexus of events is too large or heterogeneous – no geopolitical weather too swirlingly turbulent – to avoid being reduced to the shorthand of the moment.’ (Introduction)

Six Groundings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Story in the Australian Creative Writing Classroom : Part 1 Paul Collis , Jen Crawford , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 21 no. 2 2017;

'‘All Australian children deserve to know the country that they share through the stories that Aboriginal people can tell them,’ write Gladys Idjirrimoonra Milroy and Jill Milroy (2008: 42). If country and story, place and voice are intertwined, it is vital that we make space in Australian creative writing classrooms for the reading and writing of Australian Indigenous story. What principles and questions can allow us to begin? We propose six groundings for this work:

  • Indigenous story is literary history, literary history is creative power.
  • We do culture together: culture becomes in collaboration, conscious or unconscious.
  • There is no such thing as Indigenous story, and yet it can be performed and known. 
  • Country speaks, to our conceptions of voice and point of view.
  • History and memory are written in the land and on the body in bodies of practice.
  • Story transmits narrative responsibility.  Narrative responsibility requires fierce listening.

This two-part paper will discuss each of these groundings as orienting and motivating principles for work we do as teachers of introductory creative writing units at the University of Canberra.'  (Publication abstract)

Six Groundings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Story in the Australian Creative Writing Classroom : Part 1 Paul Collis , Jen Crawford , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 21 no. 2 2017;

'‘All Australian children deserve to know the country that they share through the stories that Aboriginal people can tell them,’ write Gladys Idjirrimoonra Milroy and Jill Milroy (2008: 42). If country and story, place and voice are intertwined, it is vital that we make space in Australian creative writing classrooms for the reading and writing of Australian Indigenous story. What principles and questions can allow us to begin? We propose six groundings for this work:

  • Indigenous story is literary history, literary history is creative power.
  • We do culture together: culture becomes in collaboration, conscious or unconscious.
  • There is no such thing as Indigenous story, and yet it can be performed and known. 
  • Country speaks, to our conceptions of voice and point of view.
  • History and memory are written in the land and on the body in bodies of practice.
  • Story transmits narrative responsibility.  Narrative responsibility requires fierce listening.

This two-part paper will discuss each of these groundings as orienting and motivating principles for work we do as teachers of introductory creative writing units at the University of Canberra.'  (Publication abstract)

Defying the Moment Beejay Silcox , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 400 2018; (p. 14, 16-17, 19)

'Moments began as medieval measures, the time it took for a sundial’s blade of shadow to shift – ninety seconds or so, depending on the season. A slice of sunlight. A moment now carries cultural as well as temporal weight. A slice of spotlight. Increasingly, we speak of our present as a moment, as if its minutes are sprung like an ontological mousetrap, primed to snap. As Sam Anderson writes in The New York Times: ‘No nexus of events is too large or heterogeneous – no geopolitical weather too swirlingly turbulent – to avoid being reduced to the shorthand of the moment.’ (Introduction)

Last amended 16 Mar 2017 13:32:57
58-76 What Happens When You Tell Somebody Else's Story?small AustLit logo Meanjin
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