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y separately published work icon Cordite Poetry Review periodical issue  
Alternative title: Confession
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... no. 57 1 February 2017 of Cordite est. 1997 Cordite Poetry Review
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Notes

  • Only literary material by or about Australian authors/themes individually indexed. Includes material by or about international writers/themes.

    Other works include :

    Three Translated Mardonio Carballo Poems by Ileana Villarreal

    ‘I lift the house / of language, allow doubt / to whoosh in’: A Conversation with Tommy ‘Teebs’ Pico by Mikaila Hanman Siegersma

    The Day We Bury by New Zealand poet Reihana Robinson

    Methane Dress by U.S./Japanese poet Jane Joritz-Nakagawa

    Save by Sam Riviere

    I am in love with a tall, tall man by New Zealand poet Holly Hunter

    Wuthering by American poet Tanya Grae

    Where Fassbinder Hangs His Albatross by Julie Maclean

    Govinda’s by Carin Smeaton

    Another Agenda by Adam Lau

    Unfinished Objects by New Zealand poet Stephanie Christie

    Medication by Canadian poet Jen Currin

    Review Short: Maged Zaher’s the consequences of my body by James Jiang

    Stuart Cooke Reviews Francisco Guevara

    Review Short: The Two Romanticisms, and Other Essays: Mystery and Interpretation in Romantic Literature

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Dear Immigrantsi"From the purses of immigrants roll out candies", Elif Sezen , single work poetry
The Turkish Bathi"Foamed, steamed, speechless", Elif Sezen , single work poetry
Elif Sezen’s ‘Dear Immigrants’ and ‘The Turkish Bath’, Paul Magee , Elif Sezen , single work criticism
'I am reminded of Doris Salcedo’s Shibboleth. For the work Salcedo broke a hairline crack into the floor of the Tate Gallery’s Turbine Hall. Running the sheer length of the hall, the crack broadened out to a crevasse of some feet. You walked alongside and gaped in. The floor was later repaired the cracks remain. So Elif Sezen’s ‘we / rather remain silent / as if ripping off the tree roots from its soil’. The effects of these words are quieter. But there’s a rent in the language of our familiar utterance – shouldn’t it be ‘ripping up’? – all the same. We rip off when deceiving others of their rightful share. And we find ourselves ripping tree roots off the soil in lands where there’s little for our plantations to take hold of. It’s dusty and even inimical to those with little history there, the rip-off merchants who in the state of Victoria, for instance, pioneered for the future nation the forcible removal of indigenous children from their families. The example spread, but the city of Melbourne is particularly built on it.' (Introduction)
Feminine Beings : A Resonance of Voices in Vietnamese Poetry, Nhã Thuyên , single work criticism
'I do not wish to attach gendered words to poetry: male or female, homo or hetero sexual – such labels give me the same heavy feeling as when taking stock of excessive items I unwittingly burden myself with on a long journey. Yet I also hear a difference in the stories that seem to originate from and flow into the experiences of female authors.'
Language Barriers, R. D. Wood , single work criticism
Courrier Des Antipodes – Notes on Michel Butor’s Letters from the Antipodes, Pamela Brown , single work criticism
'In mid-August 2016, I was in Adelaide to read poetry with Kent MacCarter and others as a guest of Ken Bolton’s ‘Lee Marvin Readings’ series at the Australian Experimental Art Foundation. Over a couple of days, Kent, Ken and I had some expansive conversations including one about how much we loved various works by Michel Butor, the great French experimental writer. Just over a week later we heard the sad news that Michel Butor had died on 24 August at the age of 89.' (Introduction)
That Moment When an Owl Watches Over Love = Sa Sandaling Minamatyagan Ng Pag-ibig Ang Kuwagoi"At that moment when an owl watches over love, = Sa Sandaling Minamatyagan ng Pag-ibig ang Kuwago", Reagan R. Maiquez , Marlon James Sales (translator), single work poetry
Pulses and Ripples = Pulso at Kilapsawi"A peerless red taints the sky = Walang kaparis na pula", Reagan R. Maiquez , Marlon James Sales (translator), single work poetry
Day of the Apocalypse = Araw Ng Gunawi"The sky is torn = Nagigiba ang langit", Reagan R. Maiquez , Marlon James Sales (translator), single work poetry
Fade to White = Makinang Na Makinangi"Wake up, my love. = Mahal,", Reagan R. Maiquez , single work poetry
George Mouratidis and Nikos Nomikos Three Translated Nikos Nomikos Poems, George Mouratidis , single work essay
'The following poems are excerpted from Nikos Nomikos’s Σημειωμένες Διαφάνειες (Noted Transparencies), a collection of thirty poem-vignettes originally published in Greek in 2003. This translation is the first installment of a larger translation project aimed at bringing Nomikos’s poetry to the attention of the wider English-speaking literary community in Australia.' (Introduction)
From Σημειωμένες Διαφάνειες / Noted Transparenciesi"Within the dark of anguish = Ανάμεσα στο σκότος της οδύνης", Nikos Nomikos , George Mouratidis (translator), single work poetry
18i"Today, when the festivities of the beautiful world begin, with all the porphyry = Σήμερα, που αρχίζουν τα πανηγύρια του ωραίου κόσμου, με όλα τα πορφυρωμένα", Nikos Nomikos , George Mouratidis (translator), single work poetry
29i"With the rolling of time, many waves = Με το κύλισμα του χρόνου, αλλάζουν πολλά", Nikos Nomikos , George Mouratidis (translator), single work poetry
Hannah Hall Interviews Omar Musa, Hannah Hall (translator), single work interview
'Omar Musa’s debut novel Here Come the Dogs was swiftly met with critical acclaim, even long-listed for the Miles Franklin award, after its publication in 2014. Praised for its searing language and smooth slippages between poetry and prose, Here Come the Dogs simmers and seethes above a burner of references to Australia’s thriving hip hop culture – its artists, lyrics, language and debates – a culture Musa himself is deeply involved in. Musa, an Australian-Malaysian multidisciplinary artist has previously published two books of poetry, The Clocks and Parang, as well as released multiple hip hop albums and performed internationally on slam poetry stages, including TEDx at the Sydney Opera House. Two years after Here Come the Dogs, we’ve now witnessed the release of Musa’s EP Dead Centre and his return to the hip hop stage. Musa’s hip hop lyricism is no less crafted than the poetry he’s penned. Performing and publishing across a range of artistic mediums, the threads connecting Musa’s oeuvre are strong: searing political commentary, disenfranchised and displaced youth, passion for art in all of its varied forms, and always a solid sense of self.' (Introduction)
Decolonial Poetics (Avant Gubba)i"when my body is mine i will tell them", Evelyn Araluen , single work poetry
गुम; or, Lexical Gapsi"सपना", Shastra Deo , single work poetry
Goodbye Foreveri"I am a prison of my parents’ devising –", Bridget Lutherborrow , single work poetry
Disgusting Landscapei"The West has been kneed in the gut. The vegetable cut is a freakish moor in the", Jamie Marina Lau , single work poetry
Water on Wateri"The music of the water as it coves. We covert each other. Rings from the", Ellen van Neerven , single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Confession Editorial Keri Glastonbury , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 57 2017;
'Charles Whalley’s essay on post-internet poetics ‘This has been a blue / green message exiting the social world’ takes its title from a Sam Riviere poem, which makes me imagine ‘blue / green’ text messages bubbling like algae blooms on a mobile phone. If communication and sociality are nothing new to contemporary poetics – a conversational style pervaded many of the poems by Australian poets who have been writing since the 1970s that I cut my teeth on, poets such as Ken Bolton, John Forbes and Pam Brown, themselves influenced by the earlier ‘personism’ of American poets such as Frank O’Hara and Ted Berrigan – it remains in 2016 where so many of our conversations happen online (whether directly messaged or indirectly posted). Digital media has become an intrinsic intercessor not just in the expanded ‘digital literary sphere’ (Simone Murray 2015), but also aesthetically.' (Introduction)
Confession Editorial Keri Glastonbury , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 57 2017;
'Charles Whalley’s essay on post-internet poetics ‘This has been a blue / green message exiting the social world’ takes its title from a Sam Riviere poem, which makes me imagine ‘blue / green’ text messages bubbling like algae blooms on a mobile phone. If communication and sociality are nothing new to contemporary poetics – a conversational style pervaded many of the poems by Australian poets who have been writing since the 1970s that I cut my teeth on, poets such as Ken Bolton, John Forbes and Pam Brown, themselves influenced by the earlier ‘personism’ of American poets such as Frank O’Hara and Ted Berrigan – it remains in 2016 where so many of our conversations happen online (whether directly messaged or indirectly posted). Digital media has become an intrinsic intercessor not just in the expanded ‘digital literary sphere’ (Simone Murray 2015), but also aesthetically.' (Introduction)
Last amended 28 Apr 2017 06:32:16
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