AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 4651033151777161877.jpg
This image has been sourced from Goodreads website
y separately published work icon Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else single work   prose   travel   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'From Dismal Swamp to Useless Loop, Intercourse Island to Dead Mans Gully, Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else, Australia has some of the strangest, funniest, weirdest and most out-of-place names going - now described and explained in one humorous and fascinating book. ...'

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Hachette Australia , 2016 .
      image of person or book cover 4651033151777161877.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Goodreads website
      Extent: 288p.
      Note/s:
      • First published 25 October 2016
      ISBN: 9780733635588

Works about this Work

Buggered If I Know Where I Am: the Stories behind Australia’s Weird and Wonderful Place Names Joshua Nash , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Conversation , 24 October 2016;

— Review of Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else Eamon Evans , 2016 single work prose

'Why is it that despite how much and how often we use toponyms (place names) linguists, geographers, cartographers, and historians know so little about how they actually work?'

'Why is it that place names are less prone to change than other aspects of language like accents and pronunciations? And how is it that regardless of how well furnished a map or smartphone may be with place names and directions, we still bloody well get lost? And why are so many Australian places named after knobs? ...'

Buggered If I Know Where I Am: the Stories behind Australia’s Weird and Wonderful Place Names Joshua Nash , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Conversation , 24 October 2016;

— Review of Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else Eamon Evans , 2016 single work prose

'Why is it that despite how much and how often we use toponyms (place names) linguists, geographers, cartographers, and historians know so little about how they actually work?'

'Why is it that place names are less prone to change than other aspects of language like accents and pronunciations? And how is it that regardless of how well furnished a map or smartphone may be with place names and directions, we still bloody well get lost? And why are so many Australian places named after knobs? ...'

Last amended 31 Oct 2016 10:55:55
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X