Billabong Books series - author   children's fiction   children's  
First known date: 1910-1942 Issue Details: First known date: 1910-1942 1910-1942
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Mary Grant Bruce's series of novels about the adventures of the Linton family on their station, Billabong, and in Europe during World War I.

Notes

  • In 1981, rumours began appearing of a planned adaptation of the series:

    THE WONDERFUL success of Gallipoli and A Town Like Alice gives writer-director David Stevens a wonderful climate in which to launch his latest venture, Billabong. Based on works by Mary Grant Bruce, the planned series is set during the 1914-18 war and includes the exploits of young people who live on a property in northern Victoria. Stevens is preparing the series with entrepreneur Michael Edgley and production is planned for early next year. ('Pete Smith', Australian Women's Weekly, 24 February 1982, p.122.

    No such series appears to have been made.

    See also:

    Carol Veitch, 'Billabong Tales for TV', Australian Women's Weekly, 6 May 1981, p.158.

Includes

1
y A Little Bush Maid A Little Bushmaid Mary Grant Bruce , Z1518502 1905 single work children's fiction children's (taught in 1 units)

'Enjoyed by generations of young Australians since its publication in 1910, A Little Bush Maid is the ultimate, idyllic tale of an adventurous girl growing up in the Australian bush.

'Billabong, a large cattle and sheep property in the Australian countryside, is home to twelve-year-old Norah Linton, her widowed father and her older brother, Jim. Norah's prim and proper aunts, who live in the city, consider she is in danger of "growing up wild" - riding all over Billabong on her beloved pony, Bobs, helping with mustering, and joining in all the holiday fun when Jim and his friends come home from boarding school. A fishing trip results in unexpected drama when they discover a mysterious stranger camped in the bush. Who is this stranger and why is he there? Norah's resourcefulness is tested to the full!' (Publication summary : 2015 edition)

2
y Mates at Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , Melbourne Toronto : Ward, Lock , 1911 Z536100 1911 single work children's fiction children's
3
y Norah of Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , Melbourne : Ward, Lock , 1913 Z401188 1913 single work children's fiction children's
4
y From Billabong to London Mary Grant Bruce , 7545661 1915 single work children's fiction children's

When Jim and Wally want to enlist in the British Army, the people of Billabong pack up and head to London.

5
y Jim and Wally Mary Grant Bruce , 7545642 1916 single work children's fiction children's
6
y Captain Jim Mary Grant Bruce , Z1928489 1919 single work children's fiction children's war literature
7
y Back to Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , Z1829018 1921 single work children's fiction children's
8
y Billabong's Daughter Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1924 Z956433 1924 single work children's fiction children's
9
y Billabong Adventurers Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1927 Z956484 1927 single work children's fiction children's
10
y Bill of Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1931 Z956502 1931 single work children's fiction children's
11
y Billabong's Luck Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1933 Z833731 1933 single work children's fiction children's
12
y Wings Above Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1935 Z831673 1935 single work children's fiction children's
13
y Billabong Gold Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1937 Z956523 1937 single work children's fiction children's
14
y Son of Billabong Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1939 Z830507 1939 single work children's fiction children's
15
y Billabong Riders Mary Grant Bruce , London : Ward, Lock , 1942 Z956551 1942 single work children's fiction children's

'Word reaches Billabong that the head drover of their mob of cattle coming from Queensland has been injured. Not trusting the second in command, Jim & Wally decide to take over. Norah and Tommy, well used to the saddle and mustering, insist on going to help and Murty O'Toole and Lee Wing are also enlisted. As women are not usual amongst droving outfits, they keep a separate camp but are soon welcomed as friends by the majority and befriend a lovely youngster named Rob.

'Underground echoes from the hollow hills spook a half-crazed bull called Cranky, which charges the cattle into a stampede. An intense electrical storm wreaks further havoc on the mob and a number go missing. Search parties fail to find them until Jacky, an aboriginal [sic] friend, tells Rob that two of their own drovers have hidden the cattle intent on stealing them. He leads them to the spot and Jim and Wally go in, guns ready, to reclaim their stock. The outlaws flee on foot, but the party rounds up the cattle, using all their horses and bridles, and head back to camp, glad to be rid of the thieves.'

Source: Mary Grant Bruce official website (http://www.marygrantbruce.com.au/books/billabong-riders/). (Sighted: 2/7/2014)

Works about this Work

Books That Changed Me : Stephanie Alexander Stephanie Alexander , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 8 July 2012; (p. 14)
'A Little Bit of Love for Me and a Murder for My Old Man' : The Queensland Bush Book Club Robin Wagner , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collections, Characters & Communities : The Shaping of Libraries in Australia and New Zealand 2010; (p. 121-142)
Australian Children's Literature Clare Bradford , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Cambridge History of Australian Literature 2009; (p. 282-302)
Discusses themes, trends and developments in Australian children's literature between 1841 and 2006.
A Natural(ised) Home for the Lintons : Lost Children and Indigenising Discourse in Mary Grant Bruce’s and John Marsden’s Young Adult Fiction Elspeth Tilley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 2009;

'This article compares two 'lost child' incidents from non-indigenous Australian fiction. One is from John Marsden's Tomorrow Series, the other from Mary Grant Bruce's Billabong Series. Both series feature as their central character a young girl with the surname Linton who proves herself brave, daring, and a good friend and citizen, particularly when rescuing children lost in the bush. When the two series' lost child incidents are compared, it becomes apparent that these outward resemblances are also mirrored by some deeper discursive parallels.

An analysis of the constructions of subjectivity and spatiality around the 'lost child' events reveals closely-matching discourses of mateship and settler belonging. The comparison also foregrounds the core ideologies of gender, class, nationalism and race that in turn underpin these discourses, showing how each of these texts remains inflected with textual strategies of othering and indigenisation that are fundamental to imperialism.' (Author's abstract)

Never Never Dreaming Virginia Patricia Duigan , 2008 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Autumn no. 19 2008; (p. 63-179)
Duigan describes the creation of an Australian imagination. (from Contents)
y Fading to Black : Aboriginal Children in Colonial Texts Clare Bradford , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z978090 1999 single work criticism Bradford identifies the discursive and narrative strategies involved in the representations of Aboriginal children in nineteenth century children's texts and argues that, 'white child readers are interpellated by colonial texts' to view the mixing or hybridization of identities as an 'ambiguous and threatening possibility (14). Bradford critiques the inherently 'ideological work' that permeates white representations of Aboriginality and in particular, the representation of Aboriginal children as 'hybrid grotesques' which threaten 'racial purity' (15) and who 'wilfuly reject the advantages of civilisation' (20). For Bradford, the Aboriginal children in these colonial texts carry a 'range of significances', all of which 'offer the white child readers absolution from colonial guilt by naturalizing the deaths of individual Aboriginal children and Aborigines collectively' (29). She concludes that it is the obsessive and visible linking of death and Aboriginality that discloses racial anxieties about the legitamacy of Australian nationhood (29).
Social Darwinism and Australian Children's Literature Judy Thistleton-Martin , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Children's Literature : Finding a Voice 1993; (p. 46-54)
Too Jolly by Half Bev Roberts , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 149 1993; (p. 58-60)
Untitled Marion Bannister , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 36 no. 4 1992; (p. 28)

— Review of Billabong Books Mary Grant Bruce 1910-1942 series - author children's fiction
y Billabong Revisited Richard Rossiter , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z956569 1992 single work criticism
How I Became a Writer Mary Grant Bruce , 1986 single work autobiography
— Appears in: The Peculiar Honeymoon and Other Writings 1986; The Penguin Anthology of Australian Women's Writing 1988; (p. 509-513)
y Billabong's Author : The Life of Mary Grant Bruce Alison Alexander , Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1979 Z400764 1979 single work biography
Untitled Philip Sydenham , 1978 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Official Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , July no. 68 1978; (p. 48-49)
Untitled Dinny Culican-Ward , 1978 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Official Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , October no. 69 1978; (p. 2-3)
The author reiterates the importance of preserving in formal collections works of early Australian children's books, and others which were influential in popular children's culture. She notes the establishment of a number of collections which aim to do this.
Untitled Marion Bannister , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 36 no. 4 1992; (p. 28)

— Review of Billabong Books Mary Grant Bruce 1910-1942 series - author children's fiction
Never Never Dreaming Virginia Patricia Duigan , 2008 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Autumn no. 19 2008; (p. 63-179)
Duigan describes the creation of an Australian imagination. (from Contents)
Australian Children's Literature Clare Bradford , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Cambridge History of Australian Literature 2009; (p. 282-302)
Discusses themes, trends and developments in Australian children's literature between 1841 and 2006.
A Natural(ised) Home for the Lintons : Lost Children and Indigenising Discourse in Mary Grant Bruce’s and John Marsden’s Young Adult Fiction Elspeth Tilley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 2009;

'This article compares two 'lost child' incidents from non-indigenous Australian fiction. One is from John Marsden's Tomorrow Series, the other from Mary Grant Bruce's Billabong Series. Both series feature as their central character a young girl with the surname Linton who proves herself brave, daring, and a good friend and citizen, particularly when rescuing children lost in the bush. When the two series' lost child incidents are compared, it becomes apparent that these outward resemblances are also mirrored by some deeper discursive parallels.

An analysis of the constructions of subjectivity and spatiality around the 'lost child' events reveals closely-matching discourses of mateship and settler belonging. The comparison also foregrounds the core ideologies of gender, class, nationalism and race that in turn underpin these discourses, showing how each of these texts remains inflected with textual strategies of othering and indigenisation that are fundamental to imperialism.' (Author's abstract)

'A Little Bit of Love for Me and a Murder for My Old Man' : The Queensland Bush Book Club Robin Wagner , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collections, Characters & Communities : The Shaping of Libraries in Australia and New Zealand 2010; (p. 121-142)
Books That Changed Me : Stephanie Alexander Stephanie Alexander , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 8 July 2012; (p. 14)
Social Darwinism and Australian Children's Literature Judy Thistleton-Martin , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Children's Literature : Finding a Voice 1993; (p. 46-54)
Too Jolly by Half Bev Roberts , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 149 1993; (p. 58-60)
y Billabong's Author : The Life of Mary Grant Bruce Alison Alexander , Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1979 Z400764 1979 single work biography
How I Became a Writer Mary Grant Bruce , 1986 single work autobiography
— Appears in: The Peculiar Honeymoon and Other Writings 1986; The Penguin Anthology of Australian Women's Writing 1988; (p. 509-513)
Untitled Philip Sydenham , 1978 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Official Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , July no. 68 1978; (p. 48-49)
Untitled Dinny Culican-Ward , 1978 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Official Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , October no. 69 1978; (p. 2-3)
The author reiterates the importance of preserving in formal collections works of early Australian children's books, and others which were influential in popular children's culture. She notes the establishment of a number of collections which aim to do this.
y Billabong Revisited Richard Rossiter , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z956569 1992 single work criticism
y Fading to Black : Aboriginal Children in Colonial Texts Clare Bradford , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z978090 1999 single work criticism Bradford identifies the discursive and narrative strategies involved in the representations of Aboriginal children in nineteenth century children's texts and argues that, 'white child readers are interpellated by colonial texts' to view the mixing or hybridization of identities as an 'ambiguous and threatening possibility (14). Bradford critiques the inherently 'ideological work' that permeates white representations of Aboriginality and in particular, the representation of Aboriginal children as 'hybrid grotesques' which threaten 'racial purity' (15) and who 'wilfuly reject the advantages of civilisation' (20). For Bradford, the Aboriginal children in these colonial texts carry a 'range of significances', all of which 'offer the white child readers absolution from colonial guilt by naturalizing the deaths of individual Aboriginal children and Aborigines collectively' (29). She concludes that it is the obsessive and visible linking of death and Aboriginality that discloses racial anxieties about the legitamacy of Australian nationhood (29).
Last amended 6 Feb 2015 10:32:48
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