y Billabong's Daughter single work   children's fiction   children's  
Is part of Billabong Books Mary Grant Bruce 1910-1942 series - author children's fiction (number 8 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1924 1924
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ward, Lock , 1924 .
      Extent: 256p.
      Description: [8] leaves of plates : illus.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ward, Lock , 1924 .
      Extent: 256p.
      Description: illus.
      Reprinted: 1925 , 1926 , 1928 , 1931 , 1936 , 1939 , 1943 , 1946 , 1948 , 1950 , 1953 , 1956 , 1959 , 1964
      Series: Popular Gift Books Ward, Lock (publisher), 1929-1954 series - publisher children's fiction children's Number in series: 247

Works about this Work

“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Radio Influences Children's Reading Eve Pownall , 1946 single work column
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , September vol. 1 no. 3 1946; (p. 102)
Pownall outlines the collaboration between the New South Wales Department of Education and the Schools Broadcast Division of the ABC to broadcast books to children.
Let's Talk About Books 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 25 November vol. 1 no. 1 1924; (p. 20, 52)
Reviews several overseas publications, as well as mentioning the lifting of the ban on Mrs Warren's Profession and Shaw's less-than-enthusiastic response.
Radio Influences Children's Reading Eve Pownall , 1946 single work column
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , September vol. 1 no. 3 1946; (p. 102)
Pownall outlines the collaboration between the New South Wales Department of Education and the Schools Broadcast Division of the ABC to broadcast books to children.
Let's Talk About Books 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 25 November vol. 1 no. 1 1924; (p. 20, 52)
Reviews several overseas publications, as well as mentioning the lifting of the ban on Mrs Warren's Profession and Shaw's less-than-enthusiastic response.
“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Last amended 2 Jul 2014 12:16:59
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