We Are Going single work   poetry   "They came in to the little town"
Issue Details: First known date: 1962 1962

Notes

  • Dedication: for Grannie Coolwell

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y We Are Going : Poems Kath Walker , Brisbane : 1962-1964 10030765 1962 selected work poetry

    This is the first collection of poems by Oodgeroo Noonuccal (aka Kath Walker).

    Brisbane : Jacaranda Press , 1964
    pg. 25
  • Appears in:
    y New Impulses in Australian Poetry Rodney Hall (editor), Thomas Shapcott (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1968 Z548090 1968 anthology poetry St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1968 pg. 125
  • Appears in:
    y The Sound of Poetry : An Anthology for Junior Secondary Students in Australia and New Zealand Schools Tom O'Dwyer (editor), Neil Morrison (editor), Sydney : Whitcombe and Tombs , 1968 Z1396517 1968 anthology poetry A large collection of poems particularly suitable for reading aloud. Sydney : Whitcombe and Tombs , 1968 pg. 90
  • Appears in:
    y My People : A Kath Walker Collection Kath Walker , Milton : Jacaranda Press , 1970 Z1325109 1970 selected work poetry essay

    'Oodgeroo's writing is often a provocative and passionate plea for justice. My People is a collection of poetry and prose and a reminder of Oodgeroo's contribution to indigenous culture and the journey to reconciliation.' (Source: Reading Australia website)

    Milton : Jacaranda Press , 1970
    pg. 74
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Book of Australian Verse Harry Payne Heseltine (editor), Ringwood Harmondsworth : Penguin , 1972 Z334403 1972 anthology poetry Selection of works by Australian poets from Charles Harpur (1813-1868) to Charles Buckmaster (b. 1951). Ringwood Harmondsworth : Penguin , 1972 pg. 319
  • Appears in:
    y The Land's Meaning L. M. Hannan (editor), B. A. Breen (editor), South Melbourne : Macmillan Australia , 1973 Z873720 1973 anthology poetry South Melbourne : Macmillan Australia , 1973 pg. 22
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Verse from 1805 : A Continuum Geoffrey Dutton (editor), Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 Z399014 1976 anthology Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 pg. 273
  • Appears in:
    y The Jindyworobaks Brian Elliott (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1979 Z354916 1979 anthology poetry criticism extract St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1979 pg. 296-297
  • Appears in:
    y The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry Chris Wallace-Crabbe (editor), Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1980 Z62463 1980 anthology poetry Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 1980 pg. 117
  • Appears in:
    y The Collins Book of Australian Poetry Rodney Hall , Sydney : Collins , 1981 Z542215 1981 anthology poetry Sydney : Collins , 1981 pg. 207-208
  • Appears in:
    y Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse John Barnes (editor), Brian McFarlane (editor), Richmond : Heinemann , 1984 Z900285 1984 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) Richmond : Heinemann , 1984 pg. 249
  • Appears in:
    y The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse Les Murray (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 Z427532 1986 anthology poetry Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 pg. 207-208
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Book of Australian Women Poets Susan Hampton (editor), Kate Llewellyn (editor), Ringwood : Penguin , 1986 Z406355 1986 anthology poetry Ringwood : Penguin , 1986 pg. 89
  • Appears in:
    y Two Centuries of Australian Poetry Mark O'Connor (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1988 Z322247 1988 anthology poetry criticism Contains poems grouped into 18 thematic sections (19 in 2nd. ed.) ; each section has an introduction, notes and suggestions for study activities and further study. Biographical notes on authors and indexes also included. Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1988 pg. 18-19
  • Appears in:
    y Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse John Barnes (editor), Brian McFarlane (editor), Richmond : Heinemann , 1984 Z900285 1984 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) Richmond : Heinemann Education Australia , 1988 pg. 261
  • Appears in:
    y The Macmillan Anthology of Australian Literature Ken L. Goodwin (editor), Alan Lawson (editor), South Melbourne : Macmillan , 1990 Z535337 1990 anthology criticism correspondence extract poetry drama biography short story prose humour satire travel South Melbourne : Macmillan , 1990 pg. 91
  • Appears in:
    y Contemporary Australian Poetry : An Anthology John Leonard (editor), Knoxfield : Houghton Mifflin , 1990 Z361533 1990 anthology poetry humour war literature Knoxfield : Houghton Mifflin , 1990 pg. 35
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Book of Modern Australian Poetry John Tranter (editor), Philip Mead (editor), Ringwood : Penguin , 1991 Z151302 1991 anthology poetry Ringwood : Penguin , 1991 pg. 103
  • Appears in:
    y Spirit Song : A Collection of Aboriginal Poetry Lorraine Mafi-Williams , Norwood : Omnibus Books , 1993 Z430576 1993 anthology poetry

    'In this collection of contemporary poems for children, thirty-five Aboriginal poets write about what it means to be Aboriginal today. Many of the poems reflect the anger, despair and determination of a people dispossessed of their land and denied justice. Some poets recall the spirituality and culture of their ancestors. Still others look with hope to the future...' (Source: Back cover)

    Norwood : Omnibus Books , 1993
    pg. 27-28
  • Appears in:
    y The Canberra Times 17 September 1993 Z616676 1993 newspaper issue 1993 pg. 4
  • Appears in:
    y The Courier-Mail 17 September 1993 Z616678 1993 newspaper issue 1993 pg. 9
  • Appears in:
    y Oodgeroo Kathleen J. Cochrane , Ron Hurley (illustrator), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1994 Z91638 1994 single work biography

    Includes poems, memories, anecdotes, personal notes and recollections by Oodgeroo, as well as photographs and an appreciation by Judith Wright.

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1994
    pg. 132
  • Appears in:
    y An Anthology of Australian Literature Hoju munhak chonjip Ch'oe Chin-yong (editor), Cynthia Van Den Driesen (editor), Seoul : Hansin Munhwasa , 1995 Z994880 1995 anthology poetry short story Seoul : Hansin Munhwasa , 1995 pg. 148-149
  • Appears in:
    y The Oxford Book of Modern Australian Verse Peter Porter (editor), South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 Z397894 1996 anthology poetry extract South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 55-56
  • Appears in:
    y The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse Les Murray (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 Z427532 1986 anthology poetry South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 207-208
  • Appears in:
    y The Arnold Anthology of Post-Colonial Literatures in English John Thieme (editor), London : Arnold , 1996 Z818232 1996 selected work extract poetry short story London : Arnold , 1996 pg. 223-224
  • Appears in:
    y Indigenous Australian Voices : A Reader Jennifer Sabbioni (editor), Kay Schaffer (editor), Sidonie Smith (editor), New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 1998 Z216667 1998 anthology extract poetry criticism autobiography prose short story

    Presents artwork, prose and poetry of thirty-six contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers from the off-shore island, the Northern Territory, and all six states of Australia.

    New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 1998
    pg. 147-148
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Verse : An Oxford Anthology John Leonard (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1998 Z461207 1998 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) A thorough survey of poetry by Australians in English, beginning with a selection of contemporary work by younger poets, and going backward in time to the early colonial period. In addition to poems in the literary tradition, it indudes performance poetry, convict songs and old bush ballads. An extensive selection has been provided from the work of five major twentieth-century poets: Les Murray, Gwen Harwood, Judith Wright, A.D. Hope and Kenneth Slessor. Several features are provided to assist the reader: the date of first publication of each poem is provided; footnotes explain unfamiliar words and allusions; and brief biographical notes assist in locating each poet in his or her place in time. Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1998 pg. 193
  • Appears in:
    y Australia Literature : Themes & Selected Readings Aodaliya wen xue zhu ti xuan du Yong Su , Beijing : Beijing da xue chu ban she , 2004 Z1232825 2004 anthology criticism Beijing : Beijing da xue chu ban she , 2004 pg. 166-168
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Poetry Library APRIL; APL; The Australian Poetry Resources Internet Library John Tranter , Sydney : 2004- Z1368099 2004- website

    'The Australian Poetry Library (APL) aims to promote a greater appreciation and understanding of Australian poetry by providing access to a wide range of poetic texts as well as to critical and contextual material relating to them, including interviews, photographs and audio/visual recordings.

    This website currently contains over 42,000 poems, representing the work of more than 170 Australian poets. All the poems are fully searchable, and may be accessed and read freely on the World Wide Web. Readers wishing to download and print poems may do so for a small fee, part of which is returned to the poets via CAL, the Copyright Agency Limited. Teachers, students and readers of Australian poetry can also create personalised anthologies, which can be purchased and downloaded. Print on demand versions will be availabe from Sydney University Press in the near future.

    It is hoped that the APL will encourage teachers to use more Australian material in their English classes, as well as making Australian poetry much more available to readers in remote and regional areas and overseas. It will also help Australian poets, not only by developing new audiences for their work but by allowing them to receive payment for material still in copyright, thus solving the major problem associated with making this material accessible on the Internet.

    The Australian Poetry Library is a joint initiative of the University of Sydney and the Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). Begun in 2004 with a prototype site developed by leading Australian poet John Tranter, the project has been funded by a major Linkage Grant from the Australian Research Council (ARC), CAL and the University of Sydney Library. A team of researchers from the University of Sydney, led by Professor Elizabeth Webby and John Tranter, in association with CAL, have developed the Australian Poetry Library as a permanent and wide-ranging Internet archive of Australian poetry resources.' Source: www.poetrylibrary.edu.au (Sighted 30/05/2011).

    Sydney : 2004-
  • Appears in:
    y My People : A Kath Walker Collection Kath Walker , Milton : Jacaranda Press , 1970 Z1325109 1970 selected work poetry essay

    'Oodgeroo's writing is often a provocative and passionate plea for justice. My People is a collection of poetry and prose and a reminder of Oodgeroo's contribution to indigenous culture and the journey to reconciliation.' (Source: Reading Australia website)

    Milton : John Wiley and Sons , 2007
    pg. 69
  • Appears in:
    y Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature Nicholas Jose (editor), Kerryn Goldsworthy (editor), Anita Heiss (editor), David McCooey (editor), Peter Minter (editor), Nicole Moore (editor), Elizabeth Webby (editor), Crows Nest : Allen and Unwin , 2009 Z1590615 2009 anthology correspondence diary drama essay extract poetry prose short story (taught in 23 units)

    'Some of the best, most significant writing produced in Australia over more than two centuries is gathered in this landmark anthology. Covering all genres - from fiction, poetry and drama to diaries, letters, essays and speeches - the anthology maps the development of one of the great literatures in English in all its energy and variety.

    'The writing reflects the diverse experiences of Australians in their encounter with their extraordinary environment and with themselves. This is literature of struggle, conflict and creative survival. It is literature of lives lived at the extremes, of frontiers between cultures, of new dimensions of experience, where imagination expands.

    'This rich, informative and entertaining collection charts the formation of an Australian voice that draws inventively on Indigenous words, migrant speech and slang, with a cheeky, subversive humour always to the fore. For the first time, Aboriginal writings are interleaved with other English-language writings throughout - from Bennelong's 1796 letter to the contemporary flowering of Indigenous fiction and poetry - setting up an exchange that reveals Australian history in stark new ways.

    'From vivid settler accounts to haunting gothic tales, from raw protest to feisty urban satire and playful literary experiment, from passionate love poetry to moving memoir, the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature reflects the creative eloquence of a society.

    'Chosen by a team of expert editors, who have provided illuminating essays about their selections, and with more than 500 works from over 300 authors, it is an authoritative survey and a rich world of reading to be enjoyed.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Allen and Unwin have a YouTube channel with a number of useful videos on the Anthology.

    Crows Nest : Allen and Unwin , 2009
    pg. 665-666
  • Appears in:
    y I Am Proud and Other Poems Oodgeroo Noonuccal , Warners Bay : Picaro Press , 2010 Z1824441 2010 selected work poetry Warners Bay : Picaro Press , 2010 pg. 4
  • Appears in:
    y Antipodes : Poetic Responses Margaret Bradstock (editor), Putney : Phoenix Education , 2011 Z1760960 2011 anthology poetry extract Antipodes, representing poets born between 1790 and 1983, provides a wonderful introduction to the changing views of Australia and its history over the past two hundred years as well as to the excellent poetry that is part of our heritage. -- Emeritus Professor Elizabeth Webby (from the Foreword) Putney : Phoenix Education , 2011 pg. 39
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Poetry Since 1788 Geoffrey Lehmann (editor), Robert Gray (editor), Sydney : University of New South Wales Press , 2011 Z1803846 2011 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) 'A good poem is one that the world can’t forget or is delighted to rediscover. This landmark anthology of Australian poetry, edited by two of Australia’s foremost poets, Geoffrey Lehmann and Robert Gray, contains such poems. It is the first of its kind for Australia and promises to become a classic. Included here are Australia’s major poets, and lesser-known but equally affecting ones, and all manifestations of Australian poetry since 1788, from concrete poems to prose poems, from the cerebral to the naïve, from the humorous to the confessional, and from formal to free verse. Translations of some striking Aboriginal song poems are one of the high points. Containing over 1000 poems from 170 Australian poets, as well as short critical biographies, this careful reevaluation of Australian poetry makes this a superb book that can be read and enjoyed over a lifetime.' (From the publisher's website.) Sydney : University of New South Wales Press , 2011 pg. 495-496
Alternative title: Mi Odhajamo
First line of verse: "Tiha in napol naga"
Language: Slovenian
  • Appears in:
    y Anthology of Australian Slovenes 1988 Zbornik Avstralskih Slovencev 1988 Joze Preseren (editor), Sydney : Slovenian-Australian Literary & Art Circle , 1988 Z1048614 1988 anthology poetry prose

    Poems and prose by Australian authors from Slovenian background are presented in English or Slovenian. Some works in Slovenian appear with a parallel translation into English. There are also various announcements and description of events pertaining to the cultural and intellectual life of Australian Slovenes.
    To emphasize multiculturalism and the reconciliation aspect of the bicentenial celebrations the anthology also includes the Slovenian translation of works by Australian-born poets such as Geoffrey Dutton, David Brooks and Kath Walker, and a poem by Ngitji Ngitji in the Pitjantjatjara language.

    Sydney : Slovenian-Australian Literary & Art Circle , 1988
    pg. 83

Works about this Work

“Creation’s Holiday” : On Silence and Monsters in Australian Poetry Jaya Savige , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Poetry , May 2016;
Talkin’ Blak : Humour in Indigenous Australian Theatre, 1970−2000 Karen Austin , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Philament , February no. 20 2015; (p. 129-164)
'This paper looks at the renaissance of Indigenous Australian theatrical performance, from the early 1970s to its prominence in the lead-up to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. It focuses on the specific ways that humour has been used by Indigenous Australian performing artists to highlight unpleasant social issues in their communities, such as poverty, alcohol abuse, and the removal/stealing of children from their families. In conjunction with witty repartee, visual comedy both in movement and mimicry is often used by Indigenous performers. Philosopher Henri Bergson, well-known for his contributions to humour studies, claims that the physical humour in inflexible, repetitive, or exaggerated movements is inherently funny. Bergson argues that rigidity of movements or “something mechanical encrusted on the living” makes comedians appear inhuman and, as a consequence, this makes people laugh. Contemporary philosopher and humour theorist Simon Critchley notes that the opposite is also true: We often find it funny when people give the impression of being all too human. For Critchley, the recognition of predictable behaviours is just as funny as any automated actions.' (129-130)
BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
Passato progressivo : Written on Paperbark Francesca Di Blasio , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oodgeroo Noonuccal con We Are Going 2013; (p. 13-37)
'Back to Nature' : Oodgeroo's Return to Stradbroke William Hatherell , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: Fryer Folios , July vol. 7 no. 1 2012; (p. 3-5)
Black Chicks Talking : Indigenous Women's Writing in JSNWL's Collection Jane Pollard , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Jessie Street National Women's Library Newsletter , May vol. 22 no. 2 2011; (p. 6-7)
'The library has a small but growing collection of Aboriginal material in the form of books, posters, audio-visual items and the few journals. This article overviews these holdings and makes a plea for more donations in this area.' (p. 6)
Native Voices from Terra Nullius : A Heading of Kath Walker’s We are Going B.C. Anish Krishnan Nayar , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Indian Review of World Literature in English , July vol. 6 no. 2 2010;
This paper is an attempt to analyse Walker’s eponymous poem “We are Going”.
Identities and Cultures - John Muk Muk Burke John Muk Muk Burke , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: Voices and Spaces : Indigenous and Multicultural Writers in Dialogue 2006; (p. 78-86)
Grandfather Grandmother Sing Sweet Tune Peter Read , 2004 extract criticism (Voices in the River : The Poetry of Belonging)
— Appears in: Ngara : Living in This Place Now 2004; (p. 133-150)
The Two Sisters i "how did they know", John Robertson , 2000 single work poetry
— Appears in: Moongalba: Poems in Honour of Oodgeroo 2000; (p. 83)
Oodgeroo: Orator, Poet, Storyteller Anne Brewster , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 16 no. 4 1994; (p. 92-104)
The Poetry : An Appreciation Judith Wright , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oodgeroo 1994; (p. 163-183)
The Poetry of Oodgeroo Geoff Page , 1993 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Island , Summer no. 57 1993; (p. 4-5)
Backgrounds to Aboriginal Literature Clifford Watego , 1988 single work essay
— Appears in: Black Voices , vol. 4 no. 1 1988; (p. 42-55)
Kath Walker : Aboriginal Poet Len Fox , Denis Kevans , 1964 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Realist , Spring no. 16 1964; (p. 24-25)
Backgrounds to Aboriginal Literature Clifford Watego , 1988 single work essay
— Appears in: Black Voices , vol. 4 no. 1 1988; (p. 42-55)
Native Voices from Terra Nullius : A Heading of Kath Walker’s We are Going B.C. Anish Krishnan Nayar , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Indian Review of World Literature in English , July vol. 6 no. 2 2010;
This paper is an attempt to analyse Walker’s eponymous poem “We are Going”.
Black Chicks Talking : Indigenous Women's Writing in JSNWL's Collection Jane Pollard , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Jessie Street National Women's Library Newsletter , May vol. 22 no. 2 2011; (p. 6-7)
'The library has a small but growing collection of Aboriginal material in the form of books, posters, audio-visual items and the few journals. This article overviews these holdings and makes a plea for more donations in this area.' (p. 6)
Grandfather Grandmother Sing Sweet Tune Peter Read , 2004 extract criticism (Voices in the River : The Poetry of Belonging)
— Appears in: Ngara : Living in This Place Now 2004; (p. 133-150)
'Back to Nature' : Oodgeroo's Return to Stradbroke William Hatherell , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: Fryer Folios , July vol. 7 no. 1 2012; (p. 3-5)
Identities and Cultures - John Muk Muk Burke John Muk Muk Burke , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: Voices and Spaces : Indigenous and Multicultural Writers in Dialogue 2006; (p. 78-86)
Oodgeroo: Orator, Poet, Storyteller Anne Brewster , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 16 no. 4 1994; (p. 92-104)
The Poetry of Oodgeroo Geoff Page , 1993 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Island , Summer no. 57 1993; (p. 4-5)
The Poetry : An Appreciation Judith Wright , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oodgeroo 1994; (p. 163-183)
Kath Walker : Aboriginal Poet Len Fox , Denis Kevans , 1964 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Realist , Spring no. 16 1964; (p. 24-25)
The Two Sisters i "how did they know", John Robertson , 2000 single work poetry
— Appears in: Moongalba: Poems in Honour of Oodgeroo 2000; (p. 83)
BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
Passato progressivo : Written on Paperbark Francesca Di Blasio , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oodgeroo Noonuccal con We Are Going 2013; (p. 13-37)
Talkin’ Blak : Humour in Indigenous Australian Theatre, 1970−2000 Karen Austin , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Philament , February no. 20 2015; (p. 129-164)
'This paper looks at the renaissance of Indigenous Australian theatrical performance, from the early 1970s to its prominence in the lead-up to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. It focuses on the specific ways that humour has been used by Indigenous Australian performing artists to highlight unpleasant social issues in their communities, such as poverty, alcohol abuse, and the removal/stealing of children from their families. In conjunction with witty repartee, visual comedy both in movement and mimicry is often used by Indigenous performers. Philosopher Henri Bergson, well-known for his contributions to humour studies, claims that the physical humour in inflexible, repetitive, or exaggerated movements is inherently funny. Bergson argues that rigidity of movements or “something mechanical encrusted on the living” makes comedians appear inhuman and, as a consequence, this makes people laugh. Contemporary philosopher and humour theorist Simon Critchley notes that the opposite is also true: We often find it funny when people give the impression of being all too human. For Critchley, the recognition of predictable behaviours is just as funny as any automated actions.' (129-130)
“Creation’s Holiday” : On Silence and Monsters in Australian Poetry Jaya Savige , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Poetry , May 2016;
Last amended 20 Jan 2015 07:35:45
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