Issue Details: First known date: 2009 2009
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When white people act as textual midwives for Aboriginal women writers, what happens to the baby? Black Writers, White Editors explores the outcomes of the editorial relationship for three foundational Indigenous women writers. These women, dogged advocates of Aboriginal rights, wrote their life stories in the 1970s. Their manuscripts addressed experiences of dispossession, racism, forced child removal and the struggle to right these situations. These distinctly Aboriginal priorities, perspectives and voices were vulnerable to editorial alteration. Jennifer Jones examines the nature of the cross-cultural collaborations between these Indigenous writers and their white editors and demonstrates how the transformation of their manuscripts into published texts came at a political price.' (From the publisher's website.)

Notes

  • Epigraph: When white people act as textual midwives for Aboriginal women writers, what happens to the baby?

Contents

* Contents derived from the North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2009 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Postcard from Oodgeroo : 'I'm No Parrot', Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this postcard, Jennifer Jone's discusses how Oodgeroo Noonuccal was shocked when the process of collaborative criticism resulted in the alteration of her writings in the early 1970's.
(p. 2-3)
Editing Oodgeroo: Transforming 'Stradbroke Dreamtime' from Strident Political Prose into Harmless Entertainment, Oodgeroo Noonuccal , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones analyses how the 3,700 editorial changes to Oodgeroo's original manuscript drew Stradbroke Dreamtime away from its hardhitting political intention and directed it toward a representation of Aboriginality more acceptable to white readers of the era.
(p. 4-47)
Publishing and Politics : Oodgeroo's Collaborative Journey, Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter Jennifer Jones examines why Stradbroke Dreaming was so easily distorted during the editorial process. The author also discusses how, by the time editing was completed, Oodgeroo was experiencing an uncharacteristic loss of resolve.
(p. 48-80)
Postcard from Margaret Tucker : 'God Told Me to Write This, I'm Writin' What He's Tellin' Me', Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this postcard, Jennifer Jones relates details of the writing process utilised by Margaret Tucker.
(p. 82-83)
Editing According to the Guidance of God : The Making of Margaret Tucker's 'If Everyone Cared', Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines how the 830 editorial alterations to the If Everyone Cared manuscript impacted on Magaret Tucker's ability to express of her Aboriginal identity.
(p. 84-116)
The Contested Memory of Margaret Tucker : Moral Re-Armament, Communism and Unfashionable Commitment, Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones considers why the Aboriginal position in relation to land, kinship and activism expressed in Margaret Tucker's autobiography presented obstacles that well-meaning white friends, supporters and editors were ill-equipped to deal with.
(p. 117-146)
Postcard from Monica Clare : 'It was Like This for Most of Us. That's How it Was, and That's How it is for Aboriginal Kids', Monica Clare , 2009 single work criticism
In this postcard, Jennifer Jones poses a question. What hope did Monica Clare, the first Aboriginal female novelist, have of getting her message about forced removal across to white readers?
(p. 148-149)
Invisible Workers : The Posthumous Editing of Monica Clare's Karobran, Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
Monica Clare's autobiography Karobran was published posthumously. In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines the editorial process after Monica's death and how this impacted on the original spirit and intent of the author's message regarding Aboriginal issues.
(p. 150-175)
Literary Links : Monica Clare and Left-Wing Politics, Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines how the conventional treatment by editors led Aboriginal female authors, such as Clare, into positions that compromised the political, marginal and controversial positons adopted in their works.
(p. 176-205)
Questioning Collaboration : The Past, Present and Future of Cross-Cultural Collaboration in Australian Publishing, Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones argues that while editorial style may have changed overtime, the normativity, centrality and invisibility of whiteness continues to impact upon contemporary editorial practices in relation to Aboriginal women's writing.
(p. 206-236)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Edited Lives Clare Land , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 9 no. 2 2012; (p. 219-221)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Untitled Pam Peters , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 34 no. 3 2010; (p. 407-408)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Kelly Butler , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Melbourne Historical Journal , vol. 37 no. 2009; (p. 147-149)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Perpetuating White Australia : Aboriginal Self-Representation, White Editing and Preferred Stereotypes Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creating White Australia 2009; (p. 156-172)
Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Kelly Butler , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Melbourne Historical Journal , vol. 37 no. 2009; (p. 147-149)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Untitled Pam Peters , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 34 no. 3 2010; (p. 407-408)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Edited Lives Clare Land , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 9 no. 2 2012; (p. 219-221)

— Review of Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History Jennifer Jones 2009 single work criticism
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
Perpetuating White Australia : Aboriginal Self-Representation, White Editing and Preferred Stereotypes Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creating White Australia 2009; (p. 156-172)
Last amended 10 Mar 2010 10:50:18
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