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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Bran Nue Dae single work   film/TV  
Adaptation of Bran Nue Dae : A Musical Journey Jimmy Chi 1990 single work musical theatre
Issue Details: First known date: 2009 2009
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Based on the stage musical of the same name by Jimmy Chi and the band Kuckles, Bran Nue Dae is set in 1969 and follows Willie, a young man who struggles to find a balance between the three things that drive his life: his love for his girl Rosie, his respect for his mother, and his religious faith. Willie's uncomplicated life of fishing and hanging out with his mates and his girl in the idyllic world of Broome is turned upside down when his mother returns him to the religious mission for further schooling and entry into the priesthood. After being punished for an act of youthful rebellion, he runs away from the mission on a journey that leads him to meet his 'Uncle Tadpole' and eventually return to Broome. Along the way, Willie and Uncle Tadpole meet a couple of hippies, spend the night in gaol, and meet a gun-toting roadhouse operator, while managing to stay one step ahead of Father Benedictus, who wants to bring Willie back to the mission.

Notes

  • Not all of the original songs from the 1990 stage musical appear in the film adaptation. For a complete listing of the original songs, see Bran Nue Dae: A Musical Journey published by Currency Press and Magabala Books (1991).

  • For further information, see the Bran Nue Dae website: http://www.brannuedaemovie.com/#/home

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2009

Works about this Work

From Massacre Creek to Slaughter Hill : The Tracks of Mystery Road Peter Kirkpatrick , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 10 no. 1 2016; (p. 143-155)
'Ivan Sen’s 2013 feature Mystery Road [dir., 2013. Sydney: Mystery Road Films] seeks to break out of the arthouse mould of most Aboriginal cinema in its calculated adaptation of two seemingly disparate Hollywood genres, film noir and the western: genres which are foregrounded in the style and marketing of the film. Aaron Pedersen in his starring role as ‘Indigenous cowboy detective’ Jay Swan strikes a delicate balance between his compromised role as agent of the state and as freewheeling hero, for his role as a detective is underpinned by the ‘treacherous’ historical legacy of the tracker. In this article, I trace the central importance of the tracker figure in a reading of Mystery Road, taking in, among other texts, Sen's 1999 film Wind [dir., 1999. Australia: Mayfan Film Productions] and Arthur Upfield's ‘Bony’ novels. The troubled status of the tracker feeds into the noirish elements of Mystery Road, which ultimately requires a new kind of hero to emerge so that retribution may be enacted for past and present wrongs. That hero is the cowboy, a part for which Pedersen has been dressed all along.' (Publication abstract)
Watching Bran Nue Dae in Japan Catriona Elder , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , February vol. 40 no. 1 2016; (p. 109-117)

'While recently teaching in Japan, I used the Australian film Bran Nue Dae (2009), directed by Rachel Perkins, in one of my courses. The mixed, but non-Australian students, were interested to discuss why a film that was partly about family and historical trauma was a comedy. Extending from the interest, this article considers whether there has been a similar response in Australia to Indigenous-themed films. Are Indigenous issues in Australia, today, also understood to be best represented as serious; that is, to be presented in terms of trauma and with a focus on the difficult moments? Why might many people—the Tokyo students, but also non-Indigenous people in Australia—find it hard to laugh with (or even at) Aboriginal peoples doing funny things? Using Bran Nue Dae, and my students' reactions, this article examines the usefulness and limits of the sometimes careful attendance to issues of race and pain, which are often the way non-Indigenous people engage with Indigenous peoples and issues. Drawing on the success of Perkins' film, the article also explores the usefulness of comedy.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Spearheading Culture Belinda Seeney , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier Mail , 19 November 2015; (p. 52)
'Stephen Page is...rehearsing and restaging one of Bangarra Dance Theatre's earliest productions...'
Case Studies 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Indigenous Film and Television Digital Bibliography 2014;

'Synopsis and bibliographies for selected Indigenous Australian films from locations across Australia including: Samson & Delilah, Beneath Clouds, Bran Nue Dae , The Sapphires, and Toomelah. '

Respecting Protocols for Representing Aboriginal Cultures Jared Thomas , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This essay undertakes a detailed discussion of how respecting protocols for representing Indigenous cultures supports the interests of Indigenous communities and producers of stories with Indigenous content. To highlight the importance of Indigenous protocols I review the prominence and reception of Aboriginal stories in Australian film and literature and discuss how protocol guidelines can prevent problematic representations. I demonstrate how protocols influenced writing Calypso Summer (2014), a novel exploring issues relating to my cultural group, the Nukunu, to illustrate the challenges encountered and benefits gained from employing Indigenous representation protocols. ' (Author's introduction)
Re-reading Indigenous Cinema : Criticism, White Liberal Guilt and Otherness Stephen Gaunson , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 27 no. 6 2013; (p. 763-769)
'In this paper, I will advance a critical perspective of some methodologies on appraising Indigenous films, in terms of their aesthetic as well as their cultural value. In doing this, I propose a cultural and textual approach that gives the films a context for which they can be critically understood. With a heavy emphasis on the political content of many Indigenous films, here I argue for a more critical pedagogical evaluation that considers the challenges of Indigenous films and problems that arise when we ignore to discuss them as ‘cinema’. Through surveying a number of recent Indigenous films, and the criticism that surrounds them, I concentrate on how they can be better used as texts to enhance the study of world cinema and cultural issues of Aboriginality.' (Author's abstract)
Dream Time to Act Out Elissa Blake , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 15 July 2012; (p. Unwind)
'In a time when indigenous performers are making it big on the stage and screen, Shari Sebbens is riding the crest of a wave,...'
The Aboriginal Voice in Baz Luhrmann's Left-Leaning Australia (2008) D. Bruno Starrs , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 26 no. 4 2012; (p. 625-636)
'Arguing that Baz Luhrmann's Australia (2008) is a big-budget, non-independent film espousing a left-leaning political ideology in its non-racist representations of Aborigines on film, this paper suggests the addition of a 'fourth formation' to the 1984 Moore and Muecke model is warranted. According to their theorizing, racist 'first formation' films promote policies of assimilation whereas 'second formation' films avoid overt political statements in favour of more acceptable multicultural liberalism. Moore and Muecke's seemingly ultimate 'third formation films', however, blatantly foreground the director's leftist political dogma in a necessarily low budget, independent production. Australia, on the other hand, is an advance on the third formation because its left-leaning feminized Aboriginal voice is safely backed by a colossal production budget and indicates a transformation in public perceptions of Aboriginal issues. Furthermore, this paper argues that the use of low-cost post-production techniques such as voice-over narration by racially appropriate individuals and the use of diegetic song in Australia work to ensure the positive reception of the left-leaning message regarding the Stolen Generations. With these devices Luhrmann effectively counters the claims of right-wing denialists such as Andrew Bolt and Keith Windschuttle.' (Author's abstract, 625)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Home-Grown Flicks a Hit Vicky Roach , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 21 January 2011; (p. 24)
Popcorn Year for Australian Cinema Matthew Westwood , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 21 January 2011; (p. 3)
Reel Time : Bran Nue Dae for Different Viewing Platforms Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 4 May 2011; (p. 17)
Brave New World for the Australian Film Industry Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 May 2011; (p. 31)
'In April 2011, Screen Australia released Beyond the Box Office. The report analyses patterns of screen media consumption in Australia, helping to understand shifts in media penetration and offering never-before-published insights into consumption of DVD/Blu-ray and online video. Focusing initially on feature films, Screen Australia also released a new standardised audience metric, designed to evaluate the number of times a film is viewed across its first-release lifecycle.' Source: /www.screenaustralia.gov.au (Sighted 10/05/2011).
Screen West Indigenous Strategy Wins at 16th Premier's Awards Neta Gill , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 23 November vol. 10 no. 244 2011; (p. 42)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema Chris Mann , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 141-152)
'This article examines trees in three Australian films to assess if they are seen from a white point of view or an Indigenous point of view.' (Author's abstract)
When Love Faces the Music 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 23 January 2011; (p. 4)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Reading and Viewing : Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islanders Texts for Years 9 and 10 Deborah McPherson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 46 no. 2 2011; (p. 92-93)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV ; Deadly, Unna? Phillip Gwynne 1998 single work novel ; Riding the Black Cockatoo John Danalis 2009 single work autobiography
Music Stars Get in on the Act Andrew Taylor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 3 January 2010; (p. 7)
Bran Nue Actor Dreams of Sport Louise Schwartzkoff , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 January 2010; (p. 14)
A Bran Nue Dae for Aboriginal Cinema Alyssa Braithwaite , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 20 August vol. 8 no. 184 2009; (p. 12)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
A New Awakening Marie-Christine Sourris , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 20 December 2009; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Happy Feat Peter Vincent , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 1 January 2010; (p. 9)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
New Release Tom Ryan , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 10 January 2010; (p. 10) The Sunday Age , 10 January 2010; (p. 19)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Hitting the Right Notes Sandra Hall , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9-10 January 2010; (p. 19)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Brand New Popularity Megan Anderson , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 9 - 10 January 2010; (p. 14)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Something Nue to Sing About Jake Wilson , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 14 January 2010; (p. 22)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Enjoyably Silly and Upbeat James Joyce , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 16 January 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Stellar Cast in Cinematic Celebration Lynden Barber , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16-17 January 2010; (p. 15)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Film Phil Brown , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 20 - 26 January no. 767 2010; (p. 23)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Not Brand New but Still Fresh Colin Newton , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 10 January 2010; (p. 10)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
How To Seize the Dae Marie-Christine Sourris , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 10 January 2010; (p. 11)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Bran Nue Dae Pulling in the Crowds; Makes $2.6 Million Amy McQuire , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 4 February vol. 9 no. 194 2010; (p. 12)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Broome Movie Sweeps Nation Graham Ring , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 18 February vol. 9 no. 195 2010; (p. 23)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Celebrating Aboriginality on the Road from Freo to Broome Tim Kroenert , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 29 January vol. 20 no. 1 2010;

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
When Love Faces the Music 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 23 January 2011; (p. 4)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV
Reading and Viewing : Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islanders Texts for Years 9 and 10 Deborah McPherson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 46 no. 2 2011; (p. 92-93)

— Review of Bran Nue Dae Reg Cribb Rachel Perkins Jimmy Chi 2009 single work film/TV ; Deadly, Unna? Phillip Gwynne 1998 single work novel ; Riding the Black Cockatoo John Danalis 2009 single work autobiography
Bran Nue Role for Australian Idol's Jessica Mauboy 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 3 December no. 440 2008; (p. 51)
Film Festival Opener Takes Hard Look at Timor Deaths Michael Bodey , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 20 May 2009; (p. 8)
Bran New Dae to Give International Film Festival an Upbeat Finale Philippa Hawker , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 20 May 2009; (p. 17)
Taking Their Time in the Sun Natasha Robinson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian , 7 May 2009; (p. 11)
Bran Nue Dae Diana Plater , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 June 2009; (p. 27)
At Last, Dae Dawns on Screen Michael Bodey , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 8-9 August 2009; (p. 7)
Indigenous Film's World Premiere Introduces Some Bran Nue Stars Philippa Hawker , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 8 August 2009; (p. 3)
Melbourne Premier for Jimmy Chi Classic : New Day for Bran Nue Dae Diana Plater , 2009 single work interview
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 12 August no. 457 2009; (p. 53)
The new Australian film Bran Nue Dae premiered at the Melbourne International Film Festival. Before the launch, AAP's Diana Plater spoke to the creator of the musical it is based on, Jimmy Chi and the film's director, Rachel Perkins.
Award Goes to Brand New Movie 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 26 August no. 458 2009; (p. 39)
Ray of Sunshine Michael Bodey , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 September 2009; (p. 14-15)
Bran Nue Dae Comes Home to the Source of its Awakening Philippa Hawker , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 9 December 2009; (p. 7)
Music Stars Get in on the Act Andrew Taylor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 3 January 2010; (p. 7)
Bran Nue Actor Dreams of Sport Louise Schwartzkoff , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 January 2010; (p. 14)
Our Mob Michael Bodey , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 January 2010; (p. 11)
Aboriginal Film Musical a Bran Nue Experience Andrew Murfett , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 9 January 2010; (p. 7)
It's a Bran Nue Dae Ron Banks , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 January 2010; (p. 6-7)
Bran Nue Dae for a Brand New Decade 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 13 January no. 467 2010; (p. 1)
On 8 January the stars of the new movie Bran Nue Dae turned out for the movie's Melbourne premiere.
Big Night for Bran Nue Dae Kerri-Lee Harding , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 13 January no. 467 2010; (p. 4)
The Melbourne premiere featured cast members who signed autographs and posed for photos.
A Golden Year for Indigenous Cinema 2010 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 21 January vol. 9 no. 193 2010; (p. 25)
Back on the Big Screen Gaynor Flynn , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 24 January 2010; (p. 11)
Last amended 30 Sep 2014 13:54:09
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  • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,
  • 1969
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