In the Giant Green Cathedral single work   review  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008 2008
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Notes

  • Review essay.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Monthly no. 34 May 2008 Z1499312 2008 periodical issue 2008 pg. 58-61
    Note: illus.

Works about this Work

Reviving Eva in Tim Winton’s Breath Colleen McGloin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature , March vol. 47.1 no. 2012; (p. 109-120)
'Breath by Tim Winton is an Australian surfing narrative. As a postcolonial novel, the novel's absence of indigenous representation and its portrayal of the central female character, Eva Sanderson, solicit a reading that attempts to make sense of the intersections between gender and race central to many such texts. In this paper, I explore the representation of Eva and provide a feminist reading of the novel that re-considers its racialized, gendered, and nationalist dimensions. It is Eva, I suggest, who provides the potential for reconfiguring white surfing masculinities, but whose over-determined masculinization and often misogynistic representation within the patriarchal logic that structures the work, hinder attempts to realize this potential. This attempt is further restricted by the text's erasure of indigenous people from the landscape.' (Author's abstract)
Reviving Eva in Tim Winton’s Breath Colleen McGloin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature , March vol. 47.1 no. 2012; (p. 109-120)
'Breath by Tim Winton is an Australian surfing narrative. As a postcolonial novel, the novel's absence of indigenous representation and its portrayal of the central female character, Eva Sanderson, solicit a reading that attempts to make sense of the intersections between gender and race central to many such texts. In this paper, I explore the representation of Eva and provide a feminist reading of the novel that re-considers its racialized, gendered, and nationalist dimensions. It is Eva, I suggest, who provides the potential for reconfiguring white surfing masculinities, but whose over-determined masculinization and often misogynistic representation within the patriarchal logic that structures the work, hinder attempts to realize this potential. This attempt is further restricted by the text's erasure of indigenous people from the landscape.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 14 May 2008 13:58:29
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