5392508024694948842.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
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Image courtesy of Penguin Books Australia
y Breath single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008 2008
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Breath is a story about the wildness of youth - the lust for excitement and terror, the determination to be extraordinary, the wounds that heal and those that don't - and about learning to live with its passing.'
Source: Publisher's website

Adaptations

form y Breath Gerard Lee , Tim Winton , Simon Baker , Australia : See Pictures Gran Via Productions Breath Productions , 2016 8569342 2016 single work film/TV

'Based on Tim Winton’s award-winning novel set in mid-70s coastal Australia. Two teenage boys, hungry for discovery, form an unlikely bond with a reclusive surfer and his mysterious wife. The boys are driven to take risks that will have a profound and lasting impact on their lives.'

Source: Screen Australia.

Notes

  • Dedication: For Howard Willis.
  • Included in the New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books List for 2008.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording; braille

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Hamish Hamilton , 2008 .
      4858281656337888505.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 215p.
      ISBN: 9780241015308(hbk)
    • Dublin, Dublin (County),
      c
      Ireland,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Tuskar Rock Press , 2008 .
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Limited edition info: Limited edition of 75 cloth-bound copies and 16 leather-bound copies. All copies numbered, and signed by Tim Winton.
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperCollins , 2008 .
      3167685596215793389.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      ISBN: 9781554682294
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Picador , 2008 .
      5392508024694948842.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      ISBN: 0330455710
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2009 .
      2272126914936415293.jpg
      Image courtesy of Penguin Books Australia
      Extent: 264p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 29 April 2009.
      ISBN: 9780143009580
Alternative title: Atem : Roman
Language: German
      • Publisher: Btb
      Munich,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Btb , 2010 .
      8894779392371247580.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      ISBN: 9783442740338, 3442740339
      Series: y btb Munich : Btb , 1997 6717514 1997 series - publisher novel Number in series: 74033

Works about this Work

Tim Winton : Abjection, Meaning-making and Australian Sacredness Lyn McCredden , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;

'Tim Winton’s fiction has divided critics. His writing has been characterised as nostalgic (Dixon), as too Christian (Goldsworthy), as blokey, and even misogynist (Schürholz). He has been pilloried on the blog site Worst of Perth, with its ‘Wintoning Project,’ which calls for contributions of ‘Australian or Western Australian schmaltz, in the style of our most famous literary son, master dispenser of literary cheese and fake WA nostalgia Tim Winton’ (online). And he has won the top Australian literary prize, The Miles Franklin Award, four times (Shallows, 1984; Cloudstreet, 1992; Dirt Music, 2002; and Breath, 2009). Winton’s oeuvre spans three decades. It remains highly recognisable in its use of Australian vernacular and its sun-filled, beachy Western Australian settings; but it has also taken some dramatic, dark and probingly self-questioning turns. While critics often look for common strands in an author’s oeuvre, it is revealing to consider developments and changes between individual works. How do the darker, more abject elements of Winton’s imaginative visions relate to the ‘wholesome’ if macho Aussie surfer image, or to the writer of plenitude somehow embarrassing to critics?' (Author's introduction)

Simon Baker to Direct Tim Winton Thriller Breath Garry Maddox , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 14 May 2015;
Australian Literature, Risk, and the Global Climate Challenge Graham Huggan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature, Interpretation, Theory , vol. 26 no. 2 2015; (p. 85-105)
'Envision two scenarios, the one real the other imagined, both played out in Australia's southeast regions. In the imagined one, taken from George Turner's post-apocalyptic story “The Fittest,” the year is 2035 and parts of Melbourne are under water. The embattled city is divided into two camps, the Swill and the Sweet, who make up nine tenths and one tenth of the population, respectively. The Swill live in run-down tenement blocks in the low-lying southern and western areas of the city, which are at the mercy of rising sea levels caused by the catastrophic melting of the ice caps. The Sweet look down on the Swill, both literally and metaphorically, from their privileged vantage on the higher levels. The Swill, meanwhile, are left to fend for themselves in a daily and brutal struggle for survival: jobless, hungry, they are little more than predatory animals, a racially stigmatized underclass equivalent to Asia's barbarian hordes (Maxwell 20–21; Morgan). In the real one, the year is 2013 and parts of Tasmania have been transformed into an inferno. A devastating heatwave covering most of the southern and eastern parts of Australia has caused wildfires to spread, with its largest offshore island bearing the brunt of it. There are few deaths, but hundreds of people are displaced and irreparable damage is done to thousands of hectares of land and property. Media commentators return to that most obdurate if readily reversible of clichés, Australia as un/lucky country, linking the sins of commission (the perils of boom-and-bust economics) to those of omission (the price paid for ecological neglect).1 Spoiling as always for a fight, the British environmental campaigner George Monbiot sanctimoniously reminds his antipodean cousins that they burn twice as much carbon as his own countrymen, and that the history of Australia, framed as a “land of opportunity in which progress is limited only by the rate at which natural resources can be extracted,” doubles as a cautionary tale of what happens when “climate change clashes with a story of great cultural power.” Lest the moral of the story be unclear, Monbiot flourishingly underscores it: “Australia's new weather,” he says, “demands a new politics, a politics capable of responding to an existential threat.”' (Author's introduction)
The Characterization of the Four Protagonists in Tim Winton's Breath Xu Xian-jing , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Xihua University , 5 November vol. 34 no. 6 2015; (p. 43-47)
'The research will be conducted by employing the distinctive feature analysis approach and the discussion will be on the comparison and contrast of the traits possessed by the four protagonists. Through the analysis, the paper tries to reveal how these distinctive features link the characters and decide different fates for each. Then the unique skills of characterization employed by the author can be fully appreciated.' (Publication abstract)
Borrowers Stay True to Favourite Authors Linda Morris , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 16 February 2014; (p. 23)
From the Sublime to the Uncanny in Tim Winton’s Breath Brigid Rooney , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 241-262)

In this essay, Brigid Rooney 'takes up the questions of sublimity - an the literary limits of representing it' - in Tim Winton's Breath. (8)

A Not Completely Pointless Beauty : Breath, Exceptionality and Neoliberalism Nicholas Birns , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 263-282)

In this essay 'Birns draws us back to why literature (and good literary criticism) is valuable. Literature refuses the linguistically flat, unresonant and purely categorising. It sees links - in the characters and the oetics of language - to what is lost, to what the divineing the human might be if only the 'narcisstistic market-god' could be transcended. Birn's reading of Breath's Australian and American characters and the increasingly shared modern, capitalist wold they inhabit is from the perspective of a North American critic.' (Editors introduction, 11)

Extreme Games, Hegemony and Narration : An Interpretation of Tim Winton’s Breath Hou Fei , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 283-305)

In this essay, Hou Fei argues that the interpretation of Winton's novel Breath, 'needs to take into account the context of the Vietnam War, which is not used by Winton merely as a historical event for background colour withing a surfing novel.' (285)

Water Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 16-48)

'In Dirt Music, remembering the time before a car crash took the lives of his brother Darkie, Darkie's wife Sal, and their two children, Bird and Bullet, Luther Fox recalls Bird's question : 'Lu, how come water lets you through it?' Bird is the one who saw God, and 'if anyone saw God it would likely be her. Bird's the nearest thing to an angelic being.' Bird's question suggests the function of water in Winton's novels. Water is everywhere in his writing, as people sail on it, dive into it, live on the edge of it. Clearly the sea and the river are vital aspects of the writer's own experience. But water is more than an omnipresent feature of his writing and his life, the oceanscape of his stories. It is something that 'lets you through'. It lets you through because it is the passage to a different state of being, sometimes in dream, sometimes in physical extremity, but always offers itself as the medium of transformation. When it lets you through - whether to escape to a different life, as a rite of passage to adulthood, to see the world in a new way or to discover the holiness of the earth or the wonder of the world, whether it is the baptismal water of redemption to an opening to a world of silence - and it is all these things- you become different.' (Author's introduction 16)

‘Over the Cliff and into the Water’ : Love, Death and Confession in Tim Winton’s Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 96-121)

'Tim Winton's female characters show a strong tendency towards self-threatening behaviors, transience and ferocity. This is evident in the violent deaths of Jewel in An Open Swimmer, Maureen in Shallows, Ida's murder in In the Winter Dark [...], Tegwyn's self-harm in That Eye, the Sky, Dolly's alcoholism in Cloudstreet, Eva Sanderson's Hutchence-lookalike death in Breath and, obviously, the ephemerality of mothers in Dirt Music...' (96)

Breath vs That Deadman Dance Maxine Beneba Clarke , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 73 no. 1 2014;

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Inspire and Expire : On Tim Winton's Breath Yunqiu Liu , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 27 no. 2 2013; (p. 171-175)
'Liu talks about Tim Winton's novel "Breath." In all his fiction, the sense of place is important. In Breath, the ocean takes on a comparable role as an immense elemental force that simultaneously compels and controls the protagonists. The description of place is handled with great care and with the artist's perceptiveness. The description of place is sounds of nature, thus adding another dimension to the story. In Breath, Winton confirms his status as a consummate wordsmith who can take the people's breath away with the pungency of his portraits of the landscape. He draws his prime inspiration from landscape and place, mostly coastal Western Australia, where the water (ocean or river) is important to the landscape and the psyche of the people.' (Publication abstract)
Australian Favourites 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 6 May 2012; (p. 18-19)
Readers' Choice : Tales of War, Convicts and the Deep Blue Sea 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 13 May 2012; (p. 17)
Books Shape Ideals, Dreams Tony Abbott , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 May 2012; (p. 12)
Reviving Eva in Tim Winton’s Breath Colleen McGloin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature , March vol. 47.1 no. 2012; (p. 109-120)
'Breath by Tim Winton is an Australian surfing narrative. As a postcolonial novel, the novel's absence of indigenous representation and its portrayal of the central female character, Eva Sanderson, solicit a reading that attempts to make sense of the intersections between gender and race central to many such texts. In this paper, I explore the representation of Eva and provide a feminist reading of the novel that re-considers its racialized, gendered, and nationalist dimensions. It is Eva, I suggest, who provides the potential for reconfiguring white surfing masculinities, but whose over-determined masculinization and often misogynistic representation within the patriarchal logic that structures the work, hinder attempts to realize this potential. This attempt is further restricted by the text's erasure of indigenous people from the landscape.' (Author's abstract)
An Interview with Tim Winton Salhia Ben-Messahel (interviewer), 2012 single work interview
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 9-12)
'More Blokes, More Bloody Water!' : Tim Winton's Breath Salhia Ben-Messahel , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 13-17)
'In Tim Winton's Short Story, "Blood and Water," from the celebrated collection Minimum of Two (1987), the narrator experiences the fear and joy of birth, associating birth with the sacred and the ordeal baby Sam Nilsam has to undergo in order to heave his first breath and connect with the outside world through a flow of excrement, blood, water and suffering. Breath, Winton's most recently published novel and winner of the Miles Franklin Award, suggests some of these ideas in the depiction of a boy's discovery and experience of the world of surf and surfers on the Western Australian coast. The novel encapsulates some of Winton's major concerns: adolescence and manhood, place and the environment, life in Western Australia, identity, culture and politics. It raises questions about eco-philosophical nature, issues of identity and place, all the more as it was published in the same year as newly elected Prime Minister Kevin Rudd's Apology to the Stolen Generations, a highly symbolic speech which marked the nation's desire to move forward, beyond colonization, urging Australians to build a new history resulting from both an ending (the recognition of past injustices) and a beginning (the desire to unite and embrace the multicultural ideal).' (Author's introduction)
Gendered Spaces : The Poetics of Domesticity in Tim Winton’s Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association of Studies on Australia, , vol. 3 no. 2 2012; (p. 59-79)
'How can the fictional representation of space and domestic interority be interpreted in fictional works like Dirt Music, The Riders or Winton's latest novel Breath? This article argues that the house as an active living space in Winton's work functions significantly in the context of describing a mythical, commercially marketable, nostalgic image of rural Australia as a place of masculine redefinition and maturation. The analysis of spatiality in this context provides a deeper engagement with the connection between space and gender, highlighting the ambiguous nature of specifically gendered spheres in the architecture of Winton's fictional dwelling places. Deviating from the original Victorian concept of "separate spheres", which set up clear definitions of male and female domestic spaces, Winton's narratives place priority on highlighting the male influence on the originally female domains in the house. It is argued that these spaces reflect the troubling binary between male presence and female absence, highlighting the desires and troubles of the male characters but also female trauma, self-harm and displacement. These are some of the issues this paper addresses, showing how the postcolonial dialectic between place, space and gender can be applied to Winton's fictional "traumascapes" (M. Tumarkin).' (Author's abstract)
Bodies that Speak : Mediating Female Embodiment in Tim Winton's Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 32-50)
Untitled David Gaunt , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , March vol. 87 no. 7 2008; (p. 36)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
A World of His Own Matthew Condon , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 26 April 2008; (p. 13)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Dark Poetry in the Ocean Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 April 2008; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Breathless Prose Matthew Condon , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 - 27 April 2008; (p. 23)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
The Last Gasp in a Small-Town Life A. P. Riemer , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3-4 May 2008; (p. 28-29)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Waves of Anguish James Bradley , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 3 May 2008; (p. 20)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Whether They Like It or Not James Ley , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 301 2008; (p. 22-23)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Hot-Wired Emotion Lucy Clark , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 4 May 2008; (p. 18)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Waves of Success Phil Brown , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 7 - 13 May no. 684 2008; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Winton's Latest Offering Just Founders in the Surf Catherine Keenan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 4 May 2008; (p. 63)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Life as a Wave Not Caught Carmen Lawrence , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , May vol. 3 no. 4 2008; (p. 3, 6)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
In the Giant Green Cathedral Malcolm Knox , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , May no. 34 2008; (p. 58-61)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Grace and Surrender Ronan McDonald , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 16 May no. 5485 2008; (p. 19)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Beach Boys Jennifer Schuessler , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 8 June vol. 113 no. 23 2008;

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
The Seventh Wave Patrick Ness , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 10 May 2008;

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Boyhood Revisited in a Wave of Weirdness Eileen Battersby , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Irish Times , 10 May 2008;

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
The Big Kahuna John Tague , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Irish Times , 10 May 2008;

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Undercurrents of Danger Adam Lively , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times , 4 May 2008; (p. 50)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Waves of Pleasure 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Economist , 26 April 2008; (p. 16)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
Everybody's Gone Surfing : Novel Russell Celyn Jones , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Times , 26 April 2008; (p. 12)

— Review of Breath Tim Winton 2008 single work novel
The Rights and Wrongs of Publishing Jason Steger , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 15 March 2008; (p. 29)
A column canvassing current literary news including comments from Henry Rosenbloom about global publishing rights as well as news of a Dutch translation of Tim Winton's Breath. The Dutch publication appeared some months prior to Breath being published in English.
Breathing Space Rachel Cunneen , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 26 April 2008; (p. 11)
The Sea Side of Tim Winton Jason Steger , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 25-26 April 2008; (p. 26-27) The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-27 April 2008; (p. 28-29)
Lost and Foundering Men Stephen Matchett , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 10-11 May 2008; (p. 40)
Surfing the Zeitgeist Bron Sibree , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 17 May 2008; (p. 10)
Undercover Susan Wyndham , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24-25 May 2008; (p. 28)
A column canvassing current literary news including brief reports on Tim Winton's Breath and Susan Lever's David Foster : The Satirist of Australia.
Is 40 Too Old to Hang Ten? Michael Gove , 2008 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Times , 6 May 2008; (p. 7)
Riding a Wave of Success with Novel About Adolescent Risk-Taking Jane Sullivan , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 23 August 2008; (p. 24-25)
US Travel Memoir Wins Age Book of the Year Award Jason Steger , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 23 August 2008; (p. 3)
Undercover Susan Wyndham , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23-24 August 2008; (p. 26)
A column canvassing current literary news including a brief report on the sale of limited editions of Tim Winton's Breath at Gleebooks, Sydney.
Untitled John Flanagan , 2009 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23 January 2009; (p. 12)
John Flanagan compares the price of Tim Winton's Breath at local and online bookstores.
The $42,000 Question Morag Fraser , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-26 April 2009; (p. 33)
Five Males and a Miles Jason Steger , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 13 June 2009; (p. 24-25)
Jason Steger previews the 2009 Miles Franklin Literary Award. He looks at each of the shortlisted works in turn, noting their authorship, their 'form' and quoting from reviews previously published in the Age.
Breath Wins Winton His Fourth Franklin Award 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 19 June 2009; (p. 3)
Hang Pen: Surfing Scribe Winton Wins Miles Franklin Susan Wyndham , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 19 June 2009; (p. 3)
Winton Wins Fourth Miles Franklin Award With Breath 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 89 no. 1 2009; (p. 9)
Winton's Record Four Miles Franklins Rosemary Sorensen , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 19 June 2009; (p. 3)
y Storymen Hannah Rachel Bell , Cambridge Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2009 Z1637200 2009 single work life story

'What do the artistic works of acclaimed author Tim Winton and eminent Ngarinyin lawman Bungal (David) Mowaljarlai have in common?

'According to Hannah Rachel Bell they both reflect sacred relationship with the natural world, the biological imperative of a male rite of passage, an emergent urban tribalism, and the fundamental role of story in the transmission of cultural knowledge. In Bell's four decade friendship with Mowaljarlai, she had to confront the cultural assumptions that sculpted her way of seeing. The journey was life-changing.

'When she returned to teaching in 2001 Tim Winton's novels featured in the curriculum. She recognised an eerie familiarity and thought Winton must have been influenced by traditional elders to express such an 'indigenous' perspective. She wrote to him. This resulted in 4 years of correspondence and an excavation of converging world views - exposed through personal memoir, letters, paintings and conversations and culminating in Storymen.' (From the publisher's website.)

Tale of Sun, Surf and Sex Set for Big Screen Jason Steger , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 21 November 2009; (p. 5)
Jason Steger reports on plans by American film producer Mark Johnson to adapt Tim Winton's Breath to film.
What's Wrong with Australian Fiction? : A Sceptical Look at the Miles Franklin Shortlist David Free , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , December vol. 53 no. 12 2009; (p. 22-29)
'Once in a while, a literary prize gets awarded to the most talented writer in the field. Admittedly this would happen a lot more often if the judges of such awards simply drew the prize-winner's name out of a hat. The Nobel committee, even if it occasionally pulled out the name of the hat-maker by mistake, would still obtain less bizarre results using the hat method than it does by applying its literary judgment. But still, when a literary award is given to the right winner for the right reason, you get a dim reminder of why such prizes were considered a good idea in the first place.'
Last amended 15 Apr 2016 16:05:26
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