904927972418638435.png
Image courtesy of Melbourne University Publishing
y The Man Who Loved Children single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1940... 1940
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Sam and Henny Pollit have too many children, too little money, and too much loathing for each other. As Sam uses the children's adoration to feed his own voracious ego, Henny watches in bleak despair, knowing the bitter reality that lies just below his mad visions. A chilling novel of family life, the relations between parents and children, husbands and wives.' (Source: Libraries Australia)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the New York (City), New York (State),
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
Holt, Rinehart and Winston , 1965 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
An Unread Book, Randall Jarrell , 1940-1965 single work criticism

Written as an introduction to the 1965 reprint of The Man Who Loved Children, American critic Jarrell's 'enthusiastic' essay stimulated a revaluation of Christina Stead's work. (Oxford Companion to Australian Literature). The essay has been reprinted in numerous editions of the novel since 1965.

(p. v-xli)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
The introductions by Randall Jarrell noted below are all reprints of the 1965 introduction entitled 'An Unread Book'.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Peter Davies , 1941 .
      Extent: 480p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 1966 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Avon Books , 1966 .
      Extent: 504p.
      Note/s:
      • Afterword by Randall Jarrell
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books , 1975 .
      Extent: 523p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 014002834X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 1976 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0436489015
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Holt, Rinehart and Winston , 1980 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • 'An Owl Book'
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0805004998
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Flamingo , 1993 .
      Extent: 522p.
      Description: illus., ports.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Angela Carter.
      ISBN: 0006546862 (pbk), 0006546862
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1994 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      ISBN: 020718206X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      David Campbell , 1995 .
      Extent: xxxvii, 529p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Doris Lessing.
      ISBN: 1857152077
      Series: Everyman's Library series - publisher Number in series: 207
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1995 .
      Extent: 529p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Doris Lessing.
      ISBN: 0679443649
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Picador , 2001 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0312280440
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Capuchin Classics , 2010 .
      Extent: 512p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: May 2010.
      ISBN: 9781907429002
    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Miegunyah Press , 2010 .
      904927972418638435.png
      Image courtesy of Melbourne University Publishing
      Extent: xvi, 551p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Jonathan Franzen.
      • Includes the 1965 introductory essay by Randall Jarrell.
      • Also available as an e-book.
      • Published in December 2010.
      ISBN: 9780522855548 (pbk.), 9780522864809 (e-book)
      Series: y Miegunyah Modern Library Miegunyah Press (publisher), Miegunyah Press , 2010- Z1807646 2010 series - publisher
Alternative title: Sabba Familiare
Language: Italian
    • Milan,
      c
      Italy,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Garzanti , 1978 .
      Extent: 512p.
      Note/s:
      • Other issues, 1992.

Works about this Work

Repetition and Christina Stead’s The Man Who Loved Children William Lane , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 8 December vol. 31 no. 6 2016;

'This essay explores repetition, in both content and technique, in Christina Stead’s novel, The Man Who Loved Children. I indicate how the Pollit family is shown to repeat itself and societal structures through language, ceremony, and family folklore. Content merges with form, I argue, when so many aspects of the novel’s plot and characterisation are repeated, either in pairings or oppositions. I assume a degree of difference is implicit in repetition, and consider the reading effects deriving from this inherent tension in repetition in the novel – as dramatised in the children’s resistance at times to replicating their father and mother, for example. In regard technique and repetition, I focus on Stead’s practice of presenting the same material in ways both particular and general, which I argue is a form of repetition hitherto largely unconsidered by narrative theorists. This presentation of the same material in different ways – the particular and the general – is powerful because it allows Stead to deploy both the advantages of the particular, which is good for dramatising, and the advantages of the general, which is effective for creating atmosphere and indicating larger connections and allusions, for instance to myth, allegory, and legend. I suggest that some reading effects of these repetitions include the production in the novel of meaning and form. I also consider how the repetitions enable Stead to show the return of the repressed, and acts of repression. The essay concludes by considering whether Stead’s blending of the particular and general might have implications for the classification of the genre of The Man Who Loved Children, and other Stead works in which repetition occurs in similar ways.'

Source: Abstract.

The Children’s Chorus : Sibling Soundscapes in The Man Who Loved Children Susan Carson , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 8 December vol. 31 no. 6 2016;

'The voices of children in The Man Who Loved Children allow Christina Stead to re-imagine her childhood and also to provide a platform for representing the struggles of children more broadly. Using a diverse range of narrative techniques Stead orchestrates the voices of the siblings to provide a soundscape for the Pollit world that dramatizes and at times directs the eccentricities of adult behaviour. In so doing Stead grants the children a type of agency that is unusual in the framework of adult fiction and thereby offers readers a new way to think about children. The tonal qualities created by Stead to represent the collective voice of the Pollit siblings are of strategic importance to the narrative and an important strand in the array of language strategies that Stead uses to open a space for the child’s perspective. This essay examines the ‘sound’ of the children in Stead’s novel and comments on connections with Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse in which children also frame narrative action. The novels present a family at a moment of social change and create an opportunity for readers to listen to the voice of the child as mediated by writers who worked with sound as a component of their experimental fiction.'

Source: Abstract.

'A Vermeer in the Hayloft' : Christina Stead, Unjust Neglect and Transnational Improprieties of Place and Kind Fiona Morrison , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 8 December vol. 31 no. 6 2016;

'Published in New York to muted praise in 1940, The Man Who Loved Children was re-issued in 1965 by Holt, Rinehart and Winston with a long and impassioned introduction by the poet and presiding lion of American literary criticism, Randall Jarrell. Jarrell’s argument about The Man Who Loved Children was anchored in a recognisable rhetorical move – the perspicacious identification of the unjust neglect of a palpable masterpiece, with the powerful argument this supported about issues of canonicity, literary judgement and mid-century American reading. Jarrell’s deployment of the topos of unjust neglect and his concomitant call to universal value was powerfully anticipated by another great American literary critic, Elizabeth Hardwick, ten years earlier (1955). Their arguments were enough to pull Stead into the light of the canon of comparative world literature by the mid 1960s, but not to secure her place there. After repeated recuperations on the grounds of being unjustly unread, Stead’s literary fame now seems to be founded in some part on the phenomenon of being repeatedly unread or proleptically unreadable. This essay addresses the structures and outcomes of this uncanny circulation of reading and non- reading and suggests that a priori questions of category and classification might offer another way of thinking through the activity of rediscovering again the work of Christina Stead.'

Source: Abstract.

Guide to the Classics : Christina Stead’s The Beauties and Furies Margaret Harris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 26 September 2016;
'From the beginning Christina Stead’s fiction divided critical opinion, and reactions to The Beauties and Furies, her second novel, were no exception. Where some saw “garrulous pretentiousness”, Clifton Fadiman in the New Yorker found “such streaming imagination, such tireless wit, such intellectual virtuosity” that Stead must be recognised as “the most extraordinary woman novelist produced by the English-speaking race since Virginia Woolf”. ...'
‘Not All Gumnuts and Outback’ : Exploring the Attitudes of Creative Writing Students Towards Australian Literature Brigid Magner , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 19 no. 1 2015;
'In Australia, laments for the dearth of Australian literature in both secondary school and university contexts have frequently surfaced in public debate, yet there has been less attention paid to student perspectives. This article discusses a small–scale survey undertaken with creative writing students enrolled in Contemporary Australian Writing at RMIT University to capture their views about Australian literature. The results of this survey indicate that a hybrid approach based on techniques derived from both creative writing and literary studies appears to have a positive effect on the attitudes of students towards Australian literature.' (Publication abstract)
Untitled Michelle De Kretser , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , November no. 62 2010; (p. 64)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
An Embattled Marriage Kay Dick , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times (London) , 26 June 1966; (p. 48)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Christina Stead Continues Clifton Fadiman , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The New Yorker , 19 October no. 16 1940; (p. 84-86)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Enter 'Pollitry' N. L. Rothman , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: Saturday Review of Literature , 16 November no. 23 1940; (p. 12)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Scalpel, Please Louis B. Salomon , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The Nation , 26 October vol. 151 no. 17 1940; (p. 399)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
A Walk around the World : Home and Homelessness in the Work of Christina Stead Janette Turner Hospital , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Janette Turner Hospital 1998; (p. 1-16)
A Note on Christina Stead and China Jianjun Li , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 93-97)
Discusses the representations of China and Chinese people in Christina Stead's work.
An Unread Book Randall Jarrell , 1940-1965 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Man Who Loved Children 1965; (p. v-xli) Atlantic Monthly , vol. 215 no. 3 1965; (p. 166-71)

Written as an introduction to the 1965 reprint of The Man Who Loved Children, American critic Jarrell's 'enthusiastic' essay stimulated a revaluation of Christina Stead's work. (Oxford Companion to Australian Literature). The essay has been reprinted in numerous editions of the novel since 1965.

Feminism and Male Chauvinism in the Writings of Christina Stead (1902-1983) Heather Stewart , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 29 no. 2 2003; (p. 113-122)
A Voyage Round Her Father Peter Craven , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 July 2005; (p. 6)
Last amended 30 Apr 2014 08:19:43
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    United States of America (USA),
    c
    Americas,
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