904927972418638435.png
Image courtesy of Melbourne University Publishing
y The Man Who Loved Children single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1940 1940
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Sam and Henny Pollit have too many children, too little money, and too much loathing for each other. As Sam uses the children's adoration to feed his own voracious ego, Henny watches in bleak despair, knowing the bitter reality that lies just below his mad visions. A chilling novel of family life, the relations between parents and children, husbands and wives.' (Source: Libraries Australia)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the New York (City), New York (State),
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
Holt, Rinehart and Winston , 1965 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
An Unread Book, Randall Jarrell , 1940-1965 single work criticism

Written as an introduction to the 1965 reprint of The Man Who Loved Children, American critic Jarrell's 'enthusiastic' essay stimulated a revaluation of Christina Stead's work. (Oxford Companion to Australian Literature). The essay has been reprinted in numerous editions of the novel since 1965.

(p. v-xli)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
The introductions by Randall Jarrell noted below are all reprints of the 1965 introduction entitled 'An Unread Book'.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Peter Davies , 1941 .
      Extent: 480p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 1966 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Avon Books , 1966 .
      Extent: 504p.
      Note/s:
      • Afterword by Randall Jarrell
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books , 1975 .
      Extent: 523p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 014002834X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 1976 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0436489015
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Holt, Rinehart and Winston , 1980 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • 'An Owl Book'
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0805004998
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Flamingo , 1993 .
      Extent: 522p.
      Description: illus., ports.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Angela Carter.
      ISBN: 0006546862 (pbk), 0006546862
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1994 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      ISBN: 020718206X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      David Campbell , 1995 .
      Extent: xxxvii, 529p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Doris Lessing.
      ISBN: 1857152077
      Series: Everyman's Library series - publisher Number in series: 207
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1995 .
      Extent: 529p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Doris Lessing.
      ISBN: 0679443649
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Picador , 2001 .
      Extent: xli, 527p.p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Randall Jarrell.
      ISBN: 0312280440
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Capuchin Classics , 2010 .
      Extent: 512p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: May 2010.
      ISBN: 9781907429002
    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Miegunyah Press , 2010 .
      904927972418638435.png
      Image courtesy of Melbourne University Publishing
      Extent: xvi, 551p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Jonathan Franzen.
      • Includes the 1965 introductory essay by Randall Jarrell.
      • Also available as an e-book.
      • Published in December 2010.
      ISBN: 9780522855548 (pbk.), 9780522864809 (e-book)
      Series: y Miegunyah Modern Library Miegunyah Press (publisher), Miegunyah Press , 2010- Z1807646 2010 series - publisher
Alternative title: Sabba Familiare
Language: Italian
    • Milan,
      c
      Italy,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Garzanti , 1978 .
      Extent: 512p.
      Note/s:
      • Other issues, 1992.

Works about this Work

Guide to the Classics : Christina Stead’s The Beauties and Furies Margaret Harris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 26 September 2016;
'From the beginning Christina Stead’s fiction divided critical opinion, and reactions to The Beauties and Furies, her second novel, were no exception. Where some saw “garrulous pretentiousness”, Clifton Fadiman in the New Yorker found “such streaming imagination, such tireless wit, such intellectual virtuosity” that Stead must be recognised as “the most extraordinary woman novelist produced by the English-speaking race since Virginia Woolf”. ...'
‘Not All Gumnuts and Outback’ : Exploring the Attitudes of Creative Writing Students Towards Australian Literature Brigid Magner , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 19 no. 1 2015;
'In Australia, laments for the dearth of Australian literature in both secondary school and university contexts have frequently surfaced in public debate, yet there has been less attention paid to student perspectives. This article discusses a small–scale survey undertaken with creative writing students enrolled in Contemporary Australian Writing at RMIT University to capture their views about Australian literature. The results of this survey indicate that a hybrid approach based on techniques derived from both creative writing and literary studies appears to have a positive effect on the attitudes of students towards Australian literature.' (Publication abstract)
The Biography as Periscope : Exploring Australian Ambiences Jim Davidson , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 73 no. 1 2014; (p. 94-103)
Re-encountering Christina Stead : Why Read ‘Workshop in the Novel’? Alison Burns , R. A. Goodrich , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 18 no. 1 2014;

'Despite waves of interest in the work of Christina Stead, one aspect of her writing life has been largely neglected. From September 1943, she taught three series of extended writing workshops in New York and in the process left more than three hundred pages documenting her teaching. The question motivating this paper is: Why should we, as writers and teachers of writing, read her writing workshop notebooks nowadays? This paper will place Stead’s workshop in the context of the development of institutional teaching of novel writing and her emergence as a major writer. It will briefly examine how the notebooks have previously been understood and offer a closer analysis than has been made to date of the notebooks and their content and of the key issues raised by them. In particular, we shall explore her pedagogic focus upon workshop participants developing a rigorous, analytical approach to crafting novels and her extensive use of Georges Polti’s Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations to achieve this. That, in turn, will enable us to assess what the notebooks independently reveal about her beliefs regarding the novel and its purpose. ' (Publication summary)

Resisting Judgement in Christina Stead : Critical Writing of the 1980s Ann Blake , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 4 2014;
'Jonathan Franzen writing in 2010 in The New York Times deplored the neglect of Christina Stead, and especially of her masterpiece, The Man Who Loved Children. He quoted a 1980 study of the 100 most-cited literary writers of the twentieth century, based on scholarly citations, which made no mention of Stead. He continued: ‘This would be less puzzling if Stead and her best novel didn’t positively cry out for academic criticism of every stripe. Especially confounding is that The Man Who Loved Children has failed to become a core text in every women’s studies program in the country’ (12). Franzen’s complaint is of course an old story, and what is true of this novel is true of her work as a whole. Her first two books, published originally in England, appeared with considerable acclaim there and in Australia. After thirty years of mixed reviews, she at last won accolades and prizes, but has not managed to hold a sure place in the Western canon, or with the common reader. Among writers, however, she has a vocal following, Franzen being the latest in a distiguished list. ' (Author's introduction)
Hurts so Good : Masochism in Christina Stead's The Man Who Loved Children Theresa Holtby , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 5 2014;

'This essay explores the possibility that Christina Stead's character, Sam Pollit of The Man Who Loved Children, though displaying many apparently masochistic behaviours and characteristics, is a counterexample to Freud's moral masochist. It employs and compares Freud's and Deleuze's theories of masochism in the context of analysing Sam Pollit's characterisation and the effects of his masochism on his female partner.' (Publication summary)

The Man Who Loved Children Stirring Division 60 Years On Stephen Fitzpatrick , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 May 2013; (p. 4)
'A bush sanctuary in memory of the father of Christina Stead is to be sold.'
Christina Stead : Her Luck Ann-Marie Priest , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 72 no. 3 2013; (p. 66-78)
Louie's Secret Language in Christina Stead's The Man Who Loved Children Helen Chupin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Resonances Femmes , July no. 14 2013; (p. 101-114)
Existentialism : Ethics, the Rupturing and Continuing Relevance of Tragedy A. M. McCulloch , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magnificent Obsessions : Honouring the Lives of Hazel Rowley 2013; (p. 148-159)
'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
When the Menu Is the Message Cathy Gowdie , 2011 single work prose
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 5 March 2011; (p. 15)
Cathy Gowdie contends that 'for many novelists ... food gives depth as well as colour to scenes and characters. What people choose to eat offers clues to other appetites and longings.' Gowdie illustrates her argument with reference to several novels including Christos Tsiolkas's The Slap, Cristina Stead's The Man Who Loved Children and George Johnston's My Brother Jack.
Un Oleaje Renovado Winston Manrique Sabogal , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: El país , 7 May 2011;
Además del Nobel Patrick White y del doblemente galardonado con el Booker Peter Carey, la lista de autores australianos es creciente en España. Una literatura sin tópicos ni etiquetas. [The number of Australian writers, besides Patrick White and Peter Carey, who are known and read in Spain is growing. Theirs is a literature that exceeds classifications or labels - Translation.]
US Literary Star Backs Australian Writer Kelsey Munro , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 31 May 2011; (p. 1)
American author, Jonathan Franzen has joined with residents of Watson's Bay, Sydney and others, in fighting redevelopment plans by Socceroo goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer for his 1880s harbourfront house Boongarre at 14 Pacific Street, also known as the Stead House. It was the childhood home of the Christina Stead.
Authors Fail to Save House from Socceroo's Renovation Josephine Tovey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29 June 2011; (p. 5)
American author Jonathan Franzen and Australian authors Alex Miller protest against renovations to Christina's Stead's former home in Watsons Bay.
'Socialists of a New Socialism'?: Christina Stead's Critique of 1930s America in The Man Who Loved Children Michael Ackland , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: ELH , Summer vol. 78 no. 2 2011; (p. 387-408)
This essay examines Christina Stead's engagement with the Communist Party in the 1930s and argues that her most famous novel, The Man Who Loved Children, offers a fierce critique not only of patriarchy and her childhood, but also of contemporary events in Roosevelt's America. Through close analogy Stead savages Earl Browder's innovative Party program, and establishes startling correspondences between the Pollit family and a nation where free speech was increasingly jeopardized by Federal agencies and the Party line. Though Stead's literary rehabilitation depended, in part, on down-playing her political views, their continued neglect risks diminishing the full stature of her achievement (author's abstract).
Ripe for Rediscovery Margaret Harris , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 335 2011; (p. 26-27)
Margaret Harris champions 'the recent reissuing of "writer's writer" Christina Stead's transnational novel The Man Who Loved Children'. In particular, Harris focuses on Jonathan Franzen's interest in the novel and his introduction to the 2011 Miegunyah Modern Library edition.
Eyes Right Geordie Williamson , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 3 -4 December 2011; (p. 12)
In a round-up of recent Australian and overseas publications,'Geordie Williamson advises on the season's most enticing reading' (p.12).
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)
Peter Pierce looks at contemporary Australian fiction to define Australia's 'Silver Age of Australian fiction' .
Rewriting Australian Literature Nicholas Jose , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 95-107)
'There are those of us who are trying to rethink the place of Australian literature in our lives, as readers and writers, students and teachers, and as participants in this society and culture. It's happening from different angles: in the academy, in literary studies, cultural studies, and Australian studies, including Australian history, at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and in research frameworks; in secondary and primary education, locally and nationally; and in the public domain. It's also happening internationally, through translation, and in the many different spaces where Australian literature might have meaning. Meaning, of course, is a first question and the meanings of both 'Australian' and 'literature' are fluid and routinely contested. Coupling the terms only increased the questioning, raising the stakes to beg the question of whether it is meaningful or necessary to talk about Australian literature at all. What is it? Does it exist? Does it matter anymore, or any differently from any other kind of literature, simply because we happen to be in Australia? Does it have a privileged claim on our attention, or, if it does, is that suspect? Each part of the coupling comes with hefty baggage. 'Australian' brings the national, the nation and the nationalistic, identity and belonging, history and culture, citizenship and inclusion/exclusion. 'Literature' brings not only the literary, but also language, and literacy, questions of reading and writing, and teaching and learning in relation to reading and writing. In particular it brings, for my purposes here, those approaches and practices known as 'creative writing' that in recent decades have entered subject English and more broadly the business of how literature is made is made in our society. 'Creative writing' is an infelicitous term, perhaps, but one we're stuck with, understood as something with many manifestations, widespread popularity and its own complex institutional history. Discussion of these things - creative writing and Australian literature in the curricular context - joins with larger debates about our education and contemporary culture that tend, paradoxically, to adopt a rhetoric of embattlement while taking for granted the importance of both related fields. It is surprising that, in a neoliberal, technocratic, metric-managed world, reading, writing and creativity should retain such power and loom so large.' (Author's abstract)
Untitled Michelle De Kretser , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , November no. 62 2010; (p. 64)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
An Embattled Marriage Kay Dick , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times (London) , 26 June 1966; (p. 48)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Christina Stead Continues Clifton Fadiman , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The New Yorker , 19 October no. 16 1940; (p. 84-86)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Enter 'Pollitry' N. L. Rothman , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: Saturday Review of Literature , 16 November no. 23 1940; (p. 12)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Scalpel, Please Louis B. Salomon , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The Nation , 26 October vol. 151 no. 17 1940; (p. 399)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Framing Father Mary McCarthy , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: New Republic , 13 January 1941; (p. 61)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
American Extravagance R. D. Chaques , 1941-1949 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 12 July 1941; (p. 333)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
American Tragedy Neil Jillett , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 25 June 1966; (p. 25)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel ; The Salzburg Tales Christina Stead 1934 selected work short story
Christina Stead Armed for Equality Suzanne Edgar , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 8 October 1966; (p. 10)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Christina Stead's Genius David Martin , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 16 July vol. 88 no. 4506 1966; (p. 47) The Bulletin , 16 July vol. 88 no. 4506 1966; (p. 44-45)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Untitled John Beston , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Island Times (Honolulu) , vol. 1 no. 3 1976; (p. 38)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Less Than Meets the Eye Evan S. Connell , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: Harper's Magazine , July 1976; (p. 75-76)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Out From Down Under R. Z. Sheppard , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: Time , 7 June 1976; (p. 61-62)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Joyous Love in a Tropical Climate Penelope Nelson , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 18-19 November 1989; (p. 10)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Untitled The Vulture , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 1-2 April 1995; (p. 10)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Second Thoughts Peter Craven , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 20 October 1996; (p. 6)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Stead's Big Black Diamond of a Book Peter Craven , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 2 January 1998; (p. 3)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Untitled Culture Vulture , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 14-15 February 1998; (p. 39)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Books for the 21st Century Dorothy Johnston , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 1 January 2000; (p. 23)

— Review of The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
A Walk around the World : Home and Homelessness in the Work of Christina Stead Janette Turner Hospital , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Janette Turner Hospital 1998; (p. 1-16)
A Note on Christina Stead and China Jianjun Li , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 93-97)
Discusses the representations of China and Chinese people in Christina Stead's work.
An Unread Book Randall Jarrell , 1940-1965 single work criticism
— Appears in: Atlantic Monthly , vol. 215 no. 3 1965; (p. 166-71) The Man Who Loved Children 1965; (p. v-xli)

Written as an introduction to the 1965 reprint of The Man Who Loved Children, American critic Jarrell's 'enthusiastic' essay stimulated a revaluation of Christina Stead's work. (Oxford Companion to Australian Literature). The essay has been reprinted in numerous editions of the novel since 1965.

Feminism and Male Chauvinism in the Writings of Christina Stead (1902-1983) Heather Stewart , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 29 no. 2 2003; (p. 113-122)
A Voyage Round Her Father Peter Craven , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 July 2005; (p. 6)
Christine Stead : The Man Who Loved Children Jane Smiley , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel 2005; (p. 486-489)
Breeding 'Reptiles of the Mind': Blake's Dialectics of Vision and Stead's Critique of Pollitry in 'The Man Who Loved Children' Michael Ackland , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in the Novel , Summer vol. 38 no. 2 2006; (p. 234-249)
The Insight of an Exile Rachel Cunneen , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sunday Canberra Times , 22 July 2007; (p. 20)
The Wider Shores of Gothic Andrew Ng , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 66 no. 2 2007; (p. 149-156)
Examines the 'gothic tradition in Australian and contemporary 'Australasian' fiction'. (Meanjin)
The Man Who Loved Children : Christina Stead (1902-1983) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 149-152)
y Christina Stead's Heroine : The Changing Sense of Decorum Kate Macomber Stern , New York (City) : Peter Lang , 1989 Z24831 1989 single work criticism biography
Realigning Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 192 2008; (p. 49-53)
Feminist Readings : The Case of Christina Stead Susan Sheridan , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Crossing Boundaries : Feminisms and the Critique of Knowledges 1988; (p. 81-91)
Of Fathers, Daughters, and Theorists of Narrative Desire : At the Crossroads of Myth and Psychoanalysis in The Man Who Loved Children Joseph A. Boone , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , vol. 31 no. 4 1990; (p. 512-514)
'The natural outlawry of womankind' : Christina Stead's The Man Who Loved Children Laurie Clancy , 1982 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoints : H.S.C. English Literature , no. 82 1982; (p. 159-164)
The Man Who Only Loved Children Julie Stephens , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoints : H.S.C. English Literature , no. 85 1984; (p. 136-143)
Autobiografija i stvarnost u romanima Covjek koji je volio djecu Christine Stead i Klub sretnih zena Amy Tan Zeljka Nemet , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Knjizevna Smotra , vol. 39 no. 1 2007; (p. 99-112)
Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fifty Books for Fifty Years : Celebrating Half a Century of Collecting 2008; (p. 19-20)
Finding Hy-Brazil : Eugenics and Modernism in the Pacific Susan Carson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 35 no. 1/2 2009; (p. 124-133)

This essay provides : 'a summary of the Australian literary engagement with eugenics as a broad category, followed by a discussion of the selective aspects of national and international eugenics ideas, before moving to a fuller examination of Prelude to Christopher.' (p 125)

'Something to Keep You Steady' : Egalitarianism and Distiction from D. H. Lawrence to Christos Tsiolkas Nicholas Birns , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 9 2009; Interpretations , July vol. 43 no. 2010; (p. 35-42)
'This essay will examine the fiction of D. H. Lawrence, Elliot Perlman, and Christos Tsiolkas with regard to their representation of Australian society, particularly in comparison to the European past and present. Its guiding dynamic will be the opposition between the egalitarian 'mateship' that D. H. lawrence found, and was discomfited by, in 1922 and the economic neoliberalism and concomitant sense of 'distinction' (to use Pierre Bourdieu's term) that Perlman and Tsiolkas see in today's Australia and to the world in which Australia manifests itself.'
Last amended 30 Apr 2014 08:19:43
Subjects:
  • c
    United States of America (USA),
    c
    Americas,
  • c
    Singapore,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X