5211809388774991600.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Seven Poor Men of Sydney single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1934... 1934
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Seven Poor Men of Sydney is a brilliant portrayal of a group of men and women living in Sydney in the 1920s amid conditions of poverty and social turmoil.

Set against the vividly drawn backgrounds of Fisherman's (Watson's) Bay and the innercity slums, the various characters seek to resolve their individual spiritual dilemmas; through politics, religion and philosophy.

Their struggles, their pain and their frustrations are portrayed with consummate skill in this memorable evocation of a city and an era.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording; large print.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Publishing , 2015 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Delia Falconer , 1934 single work criticism

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Language: Italian
    • Milan,
      c
      Italy,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Garzanti , 1988 .
      Alternative title: Sette Poveracci di Sydney
      Extent: 342p.
      ISBN: 8811663229

Works about this Work

Dazzling Book by a Sydney Girl Montague Grover , single work review
— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
'Lights all Askew in the Heavens' : Einsteinian Relativity, Literary Modernism and the Lecture on Light in Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney Sam Matthews , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 8 December vol. 31 no. 6 2016;

'This essay offers new insights into Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934) and in particular its celebrated ‘lecture on light.’ It illuminates the historical context of Stead’s first novel, via reactions to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, as well as its literary historical context, via the responses of modernist writers such as T. S. Eliot and Wyndham Lewis to the new physics. Eliot and Lewis used relativity as a metaphor to describe the literary experimentation of the literary avant-garde, notably James Joyce, as well as their own work. Stead, keenly interested in science but also (as a woman, a political radical and an Australian) something of a literary outsider, interpreted the science quite differently. The essay draws on another important cultural use of Einsteinian relativity, Mikhail Bakhtin’s conception of the chronotope (the unit of space-time in literary form). It argues that Stead’s understanding of the impact of relativity on literary structure when seen from the odd postcolonial space of Sydney, produces a polychronotopic text that radically deterritorialises national space and time. Stead’s use of relativity entails an eccentric critique of avant-garde modernism, but the new physics may also be reinterpreted by Stead as a distinct aesthetic strategy that speaks to an inter-war period of increasing global mobility and political strife.'

Source: Abstract.

The Tank Stream Press: Urban Modernity and Cultural Life in Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney Meg Brayshaw , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 8 December vol. 31 no. 6 2016;

'In Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Christina Stead evokes the city’s history in her naming of the Tank Stream Press, the novel’s central location. The fresh water Tank Stream assured the colony’s survival in its fledgling years; however, it soon became an open sewer and was buried as a stormwater drain in order to maintain public health. This essay argues that Stead uses the Tank Stream’s watery history to shape a narrative about cultural life and urban modernity in early twentieth-century Sydney. The functioning of the business is informed by the stream’s various identities of essential water supply, sewer and drain: at times, it seems as if culture and learning may usher in an intellectual and internationalist utopia in the city, liberating the minds and bodies of those who inhabit it; at others, all such hope is lost. The narrative Stead develops around the printery and its employees brings local place into contact with transnational socialist and other intellectual discourses, and links both to culture as a material, interactive force within the urban milieu. Through a close reading of the Tank Stream Press, this essay explores the novel’s conflicted vision of culture, politics and urbanity in modern Sydney.'

Source: Abstract.

Guide to the Classics : Christina Stead’s The Beauties and Furies Margaret Harris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 26 September 2016;
'From the beginning Christina Stead’s fiction divided critical opinion, and reactions to The Beauties and Furies, her second novel, were no exception. Where some saw “garrulous pretentiousness”, Clifton Fadiman in the New Yorker found “such streaming imagination, such tireless wit, such intellectual virtuosity” that Stead must be recognised as “the most extraordinary woman novelist produced by the English-speaking race since Virginia Woolf”. ...'
Christina Stead's Poor Women of Sydney, Travelling into Our Times Carole Ferrier , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'The paper considers the world within that Stead brought to her first novel, made up from a wide range of reading, and interaction with left intellectuals. bohemians and political activists in Sydney from during the First World War to the end of the 1920s.' (Publication abstract)
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1935 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 11 February vol. 7 no. 2 1935; (p. 21-23)

— Review of Hard Light Frederick T. Macartney 1932 single work poetry ; Melbourne Odes Furnley Maurice 1934 selected work poetry prose ; Love Redeemed William Baylebridge 1934 selected work poetry ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; An Eden of the Good Grant Madison Hervey 1934 single work novel
Australian Literature Society [Meeting Report] F. G. G. Hynes , 1935 single work review column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 July vol. 7 no. 7 1935; (p. 119)

— Review of Saraband for Dead Lovers Helen Simpson 1935 single work novel ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; Forty-Six : 46 W. S. Howard 1934 single work novel ; Lest We Lose Our Edens Jean Campbell 1935 single work novel
Untitled 1935 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 26 January 1935; (p. 25)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Young Xavier is No Idealist Laurie Clancy , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 January 1991; (p. rev 6)

— Review of South of Capricornia : Short Stories 1925-1934 Xavier Herbert 1990 selected work short story ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; Capricornia : A Novel Xavier Herbert 1938 single work novel
Paperbacks Simon Hughes , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Herald (Sunday Review) , 27 January 1991; (p. 17)

— Review of Blessed City : The Letters of Gwen Harwood to Thomas Riddell, January to September 1943 Gwen Harwood 1990 selected work correspondence ; Painted Woman Sue Woolfe 1989 single work novel ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
A Note on Christina Stead and China Jianjun Li , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 93-97)
Discusses the representations of China and Chinese people in Christina Stead's work.
Christina Stead in Japanese Margaret Harris , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 99-103)
Examines some Stead correspondence relating to a proposed translation of Seven Poor Men of Sydney into Japanese that did not eventuate 'due to the financial difficulties and eventual collapse of the intended publisher' (p.99).
'Those Boys Told Me Everything' : The Politics of the Secretary of Christina Stead's 1930s Fiction Brigid Rooney , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 17 no. 1 2003; (p. 29-35)

Rooney examines how 'Stead's fiction intricately negotiates her encounters with these [the banking and Popular Front politics worlds] divergent "phallocracies" through the multivalent and liminal figure of the secretary.' Rooney notes that while 'Stead's narrative use of the male political secretary safeguards her identity as a socially accepatable women' it also provides 'a context for discerning the nature of her contribution to 1930s debates about capitalism, communism and revolution.'

Best Sellers and A.B.A. Recommendations 1935 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 11 February vol. 7 no. 2 1935; (p. 26-27)
Christina Stead's "Seven Poor Men of Sydney" Michael Wilding , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Radical Tradition : Lawson, Furphy, Stead 1993; (p. 59-82) Studies in Classic Australian Fiction 1997; (p. 160-186)
Last amended 28 Jul 2015 13:51:49
Subjects:
  • Urban,
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X