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y Seven Poor Men of Sydney single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1934 1934
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Seven Poor Men of Sydney is a brilliant portrayal of a group of men and women living in Sydney in the 1920s amid conditions of poverty and social turmoil.

Set against the vividly drawn backgrounds of Fisherman's (Watson's) Bay and the innercity slums, the various characters seek to resolve their individual spiritual dilemmas; through politics, religion and philosophy.

Their struggles, their pain and their frustrations are portrayed with consummate skill in this memorable evocation of a city and an era.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording; large print.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Publishing , 2015 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Delia Falconer , 1934 single work criticism

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Language: Italian
    • Milan,
      c
      Italy,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Garzanti , 1988 .
      Alternative title: Sette Poveracci di Sydney
      Extent: 342p.
      ISBN: 8811663229

Works about this Work

Dazzling Book by a Sydney Girl Montague Grover , single work review
— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Guide to the Classics : Christina Stead’s The Beauties and Furies Margaret Harris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 26 September 2016;
'From the beginning Christina Stead’s fiction divided critical opinion, and reactions to The Beauties and Furies, her second novel, were no exception. Where some saw “garrulous pretentiousness”, Clifton Fadiman in the New Yorker found “such streaming imagination, such tireless wit, such intellectual virtuosity” that Stead must be recognised as “the most extraordinary woman novelist produced by the English-speaking race since Virginia Woolf”. ...'
Transitional Voices in Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney Helen Groth , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 1 2015;
'This paper will examine the ultimately incommensurable divide between the listening ear and speaking voice that defines Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934). Read in the context of an internationally conceived modernist interrogation of the conditions of literary production, exemplified by the modernist magazine transition, where Stead first encountered James Joyce’s ‘in-progress’ publication of Finnegan’s Wake, Stead’s experimentation with sound in her first novel registers an exilic sensibility which would become a generative impetus for her later work. Founded in 1927, transition reflected the fusion of Dadaism, Surrealism and German Romanticism of its American expatriate editor Eugene Jolas. Initially published as a monthly magazine it was cut back after twelve issues to four issues a year and repackaged as ‘An International Quarterly for Creative Experiment’. Issues continued to appear, sometimes sporadically, until 1938, with later incarnations bearing the suggestive subtitle ‘International Workshop for Orphic Creation’. The revolutionary project of wresting the voice and the word from the machinery of mass production and rational communication, as this later subtitle indicates, was sustained throughout the life of the magazine. Reading Seven Poor Men of Sydney alongside this collective dismantling of the grounds of rational communication throws the novel’s particular convergence of a modernist inspired exilic aesthetics with a typically excoriating critique of bourgeois radicalism into sharp relief.' (Publication abstract)
Christina Stead's Poor Women of Sydney, Travelling into Our Times Carole Ferrier , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'The paper considers the world within that Stead brought to her first novel, made up from a wide range of reading, and interaction with left intellectuals. bohemians and political activists in Sydney from during the First World War to the end of the 1920s.' (Publication abstract)
Christina Stead : Her Luck Ann-Marie Priest , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 72 no. 3 2013; (p. 66-78)
When Earth Cries Out : Telling Workers' Struggles Stephen Knight , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 133-138)
Modernist/Provincial/Pacific : Katherine Mansfield, Christina Stead and Expatriate Home Ground Fiona Morrison , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;

'Rebecca Walkowitz, citing Said and others, suggests that the critical cosmopolitanism inherent in the work of several British modernists was underpinned by an awareness (among other things) of “the entanglement of domestic and international perspectives” and an “attempt to operate in the world... while preserving a posture of resistance”. Cosmopolitan modernism in these kinds of ‘critical’ robes offers a useful space in which to examine the work of settler colonial expatriate woman modernists. In particular, this paper will investigate the powerful, disruptive and often uneven return to home ground in the shape of Stead and Mansfield’s modernist narratives about their provincial cities of origin on the Pacific Rim. This paper takes as its starting point Christina Stead’s early work, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934). While acknowledging the pressing complications of her identification with international socialism, what kind of interpretive traction do we gain by positing Stead’s participation in both Pacific and transnational modernism in her rendition of Sydney? Katherine Mansfield’s earlier New Zealand stories will provide further and quite different material for Tasman/Pacific oriented speculation about the nature of the expatriate modernist woman’s worldly recuperation of her colonial hometown.

' (Author's abstract)

The Sydney Harbour Bridge : From Modernity to Post-Modernity in Australian Fiction Paul Genoni , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This paper considers a recent spate of novels that deal in various ways with the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. These include Peter Corris's Wet Graves; Alex Miller's Conditions of Faith; Vicki Hastrich's ; and Sarah Hay's The Body in the Clouds. It is argued that these novels, written so long after the bridge's completion, are each grappling with the transformation of this icon of Australian modernism into the significant component in the nation's foremost experience of postmodern urban space - Circular Quay.' (Author's abstract)
'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
Dreaming of the Middle Ages : The Place of 'mitterlalterlich' and Socialist Awareness in Christina Stead's Early Fiction Michael Ackland , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 54-68)
Undwelling; or Reading Bachelard in Australia Jennifer Rutherford , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces 2010; (p. 113-125)
‘A Skyrocket Waiting to Be Let Off’, but to Where? Christina Stead’s First Impressions of the United States and Her Postwar Literary Rehabilitation Michael Ackland , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 225-239)
'This paper focuses on Stead's journal and manuscripts comments on Boston and Manhattan in the mid-1930s, on their ideological implications, and on the insights they provide into her imaginative projection and exploration of 'America' in her fiction.' (Author's abstract)
'Hedging on Destiny' : History and Its Marxist Dimensions in the Early Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , January vol. 41 no. 1 2010; (p. 91-109)
World Literature, Stalinism, and the Nation Simon During , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exit Capitalism : Literary Culture, Theory and Post-Secular Modernity 2010; (p. 57-94)
Modeled on Blake : Christina Stead's Communist Affiliation and Her Problematic Fellow-Travellers Michael Ackland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bernard Hickey, a Roving Cultural Ambassador : Essays in His Memory. 2009; (p. 17-31)

'Christina Stead's relationship with the Communist Party is still the subject of considerable debate. According to her most authoritative biographer, Stead's creative passions were kindled by personalities, not politics, and she had no desire to join the party. Her 'commitment', Hazel Rowley asserts, 'was to her writing, not politics' (Rowley, 1993: 254), as if the two were distinct and separate spheres; and certainly there are lengthy complaints in Stead's letters about party-hacks and their blinkered actions.' (p 17)

Realigning Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 192 2008; (p. 49-53)
'What a History is That? What an Enigma...?' : Imagination, Destiny and Socialist Imperatives in Christina Stead's Seven Poor Men of Sydney Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 68 no. 3 2008; (p. 189-212)
A Note on Christina Stead and China Jianjun Li , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 93-97)
Discusses the representations of China and Chinese people in Christina Stead's work.
Christina Stead in Japanese Margaret Harris , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 99-103)
Examines some Stead correspondence relating to a proposed translation of Seven Poor Men of Sydney into Japanese that did not eventuate 'due to the financial difficulties and eventual collapse of the intended publisher' (p.99).
'Those Boys Told Me Everything' : The Politics of the Secretary of Christina Stead's 1930s Fiction Brigid Rooney , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 17 no. 1 2003; (p. 29-35)

Rooney examines how 'Stead's fiction intricately negotiates her encounters with these [the banking and Popular Front politics worlds] divergent "phallocracies" through the multivalent and liminal figure of the secretary.' Rooney notes that while 'Stead's narrative use of the male political secretary safeguards her identity as a socially accepatable women' it also provides 'a context for discerning the nature of her contribution to 1930s debates about capitalism, communism and revolution.'

A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1935 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 11 February vol. 7 no. 2 1935; (p. 21-23)

— Review of Hard Light Frederick T. Macartney 1932 single work poetry ; Melbourne Odes Furnley Maurice 1934 selected work poetry prose ; Love Redeemed William Baylebridge 1934 selected work poetry ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; An Eden of the Good Grant Madison Hervey 1934 single work novel
Australian Literature Society [Meeting Report] F. G. G. Hynes , 1935 single work review column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 July vol. 7 no. 7 1935; (p. 119)

— Review of Saraband for Dead Lovers Helen Simpson 1935 single work novel ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; Forty-Six : 46 W. S. Howard 1934 single work novel ; Lest We Lose Our Edens Jean Campbell 1935 single work novel
Untitled 1935 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 26 January 1935; (p. 25)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Young Xavier is No Idealist Laurie Clancy , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 January 1991; (p. rev 6)

— Review of South of Capricornia : Short Stories 1925-1934 Xavier Herbert 1990 selected work short story ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; Capricornia : A Novel Xavier Herbert 1938 single work novel
Paperbacks Simon Hughes , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Herald (Sunday Review) , 27 January 1991; (p. 17)

— Review of Blessed City : The Letters of Gwen Harwood to Thomas Riddell, January to September 1943 Gwen Harwood 1990 selected work correspondence ; Painted Woman Sue Woolfe 1989 single work novel ; Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Dazzling Book by a Sydney Girl Montague Grover , single work review
— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Dazzling Book by a Sydney Girl Montague Grover , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 28 November vol. 55 no. 2859 1934; (p. 2)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Near South Head 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Sun , 25 November 1934;

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Poor Men of Sydney 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 December 1934; (p. 6)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Seven Poor Men of Sydney R. D. Chaques , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 8 November 1934;

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Untitled 1935 single work review
— Appears in: The Mirror , [1] January 1935;

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
A Puzzling Case of Neglect Laurie Clancy , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 19 March 1966; (p. 9)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Among the Sussos Clement Semmler , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May vol. 5 no. 7 1966; (p. 137)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
An Embattled Marriage Kay Dick , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times (London) , 26 June 1966; (p. 48)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; The Man Who Loved Children Christina Stead 1940 single work novel
Christina Stead's Books Excite After 30 Years Jean Battersby , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 11 June 1966; (p. 18)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel ; The Salzburg Tales Christina Stead 1934 selected work short story
Genius in Alien Sydney Ian. Cross , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 23 April vol. 88 no. 4494 1966; (p. 56)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Lighthouse Flashes Robert Burns , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Nation , 11 June 1966; (p. 21)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Reprint Worth Waiting For Maurice Dunlevy , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 26 February 1966; (p. 10)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Some Australians and Iris Murdoch Judah Waten , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 19 February 1966; (p. 22)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
Seven Poor Men of Sydney Anthony Miller , 1968 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , July no. 2 1968; (p. 61-66)

— Review of Seven Poor Men of Sydney Christina Stead 1934 single work novel
A Note on Christina Stead and China Jianjun Li , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 93-97)
Discusses the representations of China and Chinese people in Christina Stead's work.
Christina Stead in Japanese Margaret Harris , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 99-103)
Examines some Stead correspondence relating to a proposed translation of Seven Poor Men of Sydney into Japanese that did not eventuate 'due to the financial difficulties and eventual collapse of the intended publisher' (p.99).
'Those Boys Told Me Everything' : The Politics of the Secretary of Christina Stead's 1930s Fiction Brigid Rooney , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 17 no. 1 2003; (p. 29-35)

Rooney examines how 'Stead's fiction intricately negotiates her encounters with these [the banking and Popular Front politics worlds] divergent "phallocracies" through the multivalent and liminal figure of the secretary.' Rooney notes that while 'Stead's narrative use of the male political secretary safeguards her identity as a socially accepatable women' it also provides 'a context for discerning the nature of her contribution to 1930s debates about capitalism, communism and revolution.'

Best Sellers and A.B.A. Recommendations 1935 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 11 February vol. 7 no. 2 1935; (p. 26-27)
Christina Stead's "Seven Poor Men of Sydney" Michael Wilding , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Radical Tradition : Lawson, Furphy, Stead 1993; (p. 59-82) Studies in Classic Australian Fiction 1997; (p. 160-186)
Gays and Writing : Thirties Images Garry Wotherspoon , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Gay Information , no. 14-15 1984; (p. 46-50)
Realigning Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 192 2008; (p. 49-53)
'What a History is That? What an Enigma...?' : Imagination, Destiny and Socialist Imperatives in Christina Stead's Seven Poor Men of Sydney Michael Ackland , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 68 no. 3 2008; (p. 189-212)
Modeled on Blake : Christina Stead's Communist Affiliation and Her Problematic Fellow-Travellers Michael Ackland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bernard Hickey, a Roving Cultural Ambassador : Essays in His Memory. 2009; (p. 17-31)

'Christina Stead's relationship with the Communist Party is still the subject of considerable debate. According to her most authoritative biographer, Stead's creative passions were kindled by personalities, not politics, and she had no desire to join the party. Her 'commitment', Hazel Rowley asserts, 'was to her writing, not politics' (Rowley, 1993: 254), as if the two were distinct and separate spheres; and certainly there are lengthy complaints in Stead's letters about party-hacks and their blinkered actions.' (p 17)

A New Legend of Australia in Christina Stead's 'Seven Poor Men of Sydney' 『シドニーの七人の貧しい男たち』の新しい伝説的役割 Yasue Arimitsu , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Doshisha Daigaku Eigo Eibungaku kenkyu , March 1996; (p. 111-136)

'The history of White Australia is only about 200 years old while the history of Aboriginal Australians has run for more than forty thousand years. One Australian historian remarked that the white Australian people were not sure of what they were until as recently as the 1950s so lacked confidence in themselves as Australians. He remarked that this was supported by the fact that white people did not have their own legends or myths. The Aboriginal people already had their own legends and myths when the English people came to live in Australia. Australian historians strongly felt that white Australians needed to have their own legends in order to be sure of what they were. Legends could give them reasons why they live there and therefore they could have a meaningful bond with the Australian land.

Russel Ward wrote in his The Australian Legend in 1958 that the novels written by Henry Lawson and Joseph Furphy in the 1880s and 1890s successfully portrayed the real traits of Australia, since they dealt with life in the Australian bush. Ward held that the Australian bush had features not found in the English environment. It is true that the works of Lawson and Furphy about the bush life attracted many Australian readers because they show genuine Australian colonial life. It is said that their works established a tradition of Australian literature called social realism.

Although the works written by Lawson and Furphy were concerned with bush life, they reflected only white male characters and no female characters nor Aborigines. Also they dealt with day-to-day life in the bush but never tried to render the deeper levels of life.

In this paper, I intend to discover a new legend of Australia through the work of Christina Stead's Seven Poor Men of Sydney in support of the historians who claimed that Lawson and Furphy did not fully represent the Australian legends. It is commonly acknowledged that no novels before Seven Poor Men of Sydney rendered spiritual or psychological life, and this is the very first novel that escapes the Australian tradition of social realism.

This novel is about the people of Sydney and portrays the harsh lives they endured during the economic recession of the 1920s. Employing modern techniques, Stead depicts Australians' experiences of this period and also goes deep into the characters' inner life in their search for what they are. Stead successfully portrayed Australians' struggle for identity in severing the cultural bond with their mother country. I show this through the central characters of Michael and Catherine Baguenault and also show that their struggle to find their places in Australia becomes a legend for Australians represented in the character of Joseph Baguenault, the only survivor in the novel.' (Source: Doshisha Daigaku Eigo Eibungaku kenkyu)

Undwelling; or Reading Bachelard in Australia Jennifer Rutherford , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces 2010; (p. 113-125)
‘A Skyrocket Waiting to Be Let Off’, but to Where? Christina Stead’s First Impressions of the United States and Her Postwar Literary Rehabilitation Michael Ackland , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 225-239)
'This paper focuses on Stead's journal and manuscripts comments on Boston and Manhattan in the mid-1930s, on their ideological implications, and on the insights they provide into her imaginative projection and exploration of 'America' in her fiction.' (Author's abstract)
'Hedging on Destiny' : History and Its Marxist Dimensions in the Early Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , January vol. 41 no. 1 2010; (p. 91-109)
Dreaming of the Middle Ages : The Place of 'mitterlalterlich' and Socialist Awareness in Christina Stead's Early Fiction Michael Ackland , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 54-68)
The Sydney Harbour Bridge : From Modernity to Post-Modernity in Australian Fiction Paul Genoni , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This paper considers a recent spate of novels that deal in various ways with the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. These include Peter Corris's Wet Graves; Alex Miller's Conditions of Faith; Vicki Hastrich's ; and Sarah Hay's The Body in the Clouds. It is argued that these novels, written so long after the bridge's completion, are each grappling with the transformation of this icon of Australian modernism into the significant component in the nation's foremost experience of postmodern urban space - Circular Quay.' (Author's abstract)
Christina Stead M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1938 single work criticism
— Appears in: Essays in Australian Fiction 1938; (p. 158-181) M. Barnard Eldershaw : Plaque with Laurel, Essays, Reviews and Correspondence 1995; (p. 233-237) The Magic Phrase : Critical Essays on Christina Stead 2000; (p. 23-38, notes 267)
World Literature, Stalinism, and the Nation Simon During , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exit Capitalism : Literary Culture, Theory and Post-Secular Modernity 2010; (p. 57-94)
'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
Christina Stead in Southerly Margaret Harris , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , September vol. 49 no. 3 1989; (p. 514-528)
Names in Stead's "Seven Poor Men of Sydney" Margaret Harris , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconnoitres : Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes 1992; (p. 142-153)
Last amended 28 Jul 2015 13:51:49
Subjects:
  • Urban,
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
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