This image has been sourced from Web
y Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley selected work   prose   criticism   Indigenous story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1983 1983
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AbstractHistory

Gularabulu, 'the coast where the sun goes down' is an area of country on the coast of the West Kimberley in the north-west of Western Australia. These stories belong not just to Paddy Roe but to all the people from the traditional tribal groupings of the Garadjeri, Nyigina, Yaour, Nyul-nyul and Djaber-djaber tribes.

Notes

  • "The stories as they are presented here are word for word transcriptions from tape recordings. Hesitations and the occasional interventions from a listener are included.... These stories represent the continuation of an Aboriginal oral narrative technique.' Source: Introdction by Stephen Muecke.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 1983 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley : Introduction, Stephen Muecke , 1983 single work criticism (p. i-ix)
Mirdinan, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 1-17)
Duegara, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 19-28)
Worawora Woman, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 29-34)
Yaam, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 35-44)
Donkey Devil : Story One, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 45-50)
Donkey Devil : Story Two, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 51-55)
Lardi, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 57-64)
Living Ghost : Story One, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 65-69)
Living Ghost : Story Two, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 70)
Living Ghost : Story Three, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 71-74)
Djaringgalong, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 75-82)
Langgur, Paddy Roe , 1983 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 83-92)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 1983 .
      This image has been sourced from Web
      Extent: vii, 98p.p.
      Description: illus., port.
      ISBN: 0909144656
    • Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 1993 .
      Extent: xii, 98 p.p.
      Description: illus., port.
      ISBN: 1863680586

Works about this Work

A Diplomat for the History Wars Stephen Muecke , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'In this experimental reflection on the ‘history wars’ associated with Keith Windschuttle’s writings, the author recruits a storyteller, an ex-diplomat, whose yarning style subtly contests the ‘graphocentrism’ of Windschuttle’s faith in the truth of the written document. For the latter, facts are both enshrined in print, yet forever ‘out there’ in the world innocently waiting to be gathered. Against this, the essay argues that facts are indeed ‘fabricated’– in an appropriation of Windschuttle’s critique of black arm-band historians. Not only fabricated, but well-fabricated1 according to the best protocols and methods of historical research. If historical facts are thus constructed, they must also be institutionally supported so that they can continue to exist, and that too is an on-going negotiation in which diplomacy must also play a part. The negotiation is not between the veracity of facts and the distortions of ideology; peace will never be achieved along that pathway. The real war is between the most cherished values that support the manufacture of the facts that serve the parties involved. The skilled diplomat intervenes to listen to what it is they hold most dear, and then negotiates what they might relinquish to achieve a workable peace.' (Publication abstract)
The Case for Gularabulu by Paddy Roe Stuart Cooke , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 15 April 2014;

In this article, Stuart Cooke argues for the merits of Gularabulu: Stories from the West Kimberley.

y Entangled Subjects : Indigenous/Australian Cross-Cultures Of Talk, Text, And Modernity Michèle Grossman , Netherlands : Rodopi , 2013 Z1938856 2013 single work criticism

'Indigenous Australian cultures were long known to the world mainly from the writing of anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, missionaries, and others. Indigenous Australians themselves have worked across a range of genres to challenge and reconfigure this textual legacy, so that they are now strongly represented through their own life-narratives of identity, history, politics, and culture. Even as Indigenous-authored texts have opened up new horizons of engagement with Aboriginal knowledge and representation, however, the textual politics of some of these narratives - particularly when cross-culturally produced or edited - can remain haunted by colonially grounded assumptions about orality and literacy.

Through an examination of key moments in the theorizing of orality and literacy and key texts in cross-culturally produced Indigenous life-writing, Entangled Subjects explores how some of these works can sustain, rather than trouble, the frontier zone established by modernity in relation to 'talk' and 'text'. Yet contemporary Indigenous vernaculars offer radical new approaches to how we might move beyond the orality-literacy 'frontier', and how modernity and the a-modern are productively entangled in the process. ' (Source: Angus & Robertson website www.angusrobertson.com.au)

y Speaking the Earth's Languages : A Theory for Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics Stuart Cooke , New York (City) Amsterdam : Rodopi , 2013 6178076 2013 single work criticism

Speaking the Earth’s Languages brings together for the first time critical discussions of postcolonial poetics from Australia and Chile. The book crosses multiple languages, landscapes, and disciplines, and draws on a wide range of both oral and written poetries, in order to make strong claims about the importance of ‘a nomad poetics’ – not only for understanding Aboriginal or Mapuche writing practices but, more widely, for the problems confronting contemporary literature and politics in colonized landscapes.

The book begins by critiquing canonical examples of non-indigenous postcolonial poetics. Incisive re-readings of two icons of Australian and Chilean poetry, Judith Wright (1915–2000) and Pablo Neruda (1904–1973), provide rich insights into non-indigenous responses to colonization in the wake of modernity. The second half of the book establishes compositional links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, and between such oral and written poetics more generally.

The book’s final part develops an ‘emerging synthesis’ of contemporary Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, with reference to the work of two of the most important avant-garde Aboriginal and Mapuche poets of recent times, Lionel Fogarty (1958–) and Paulo Huirimilla (1973–).

Speaking the Earth’s Languages uses these fascinating links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics as the basis of a deliberately nomadic, open-ended theory for an Australian–Chilean postcolonial poetics. 'The central argument of this book,' the author writes, 'is that a nomadic poetics is essential for a genuinely postcolonial form of habitation, or a habitation of colonized landscapes that doesn’t continue to replicate colonialist ideologies involving indigenous dispossession and environmental exploitation.' [from the publisher's website]

Aboriginal Literature in Austria: A Discussion of Three Audiobooks Oliver Haag , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2011; (p. 51-64)
'The author discusses the overseas marketing of translated Aboriginal literature which has received scant scholarly attention. The paper examines three examples of Aboriginal literature that have been translated into German and produced as audiobooks by two Austrian publishers...this paper focuses on the translation and promotion of these audiobooks by their Austrian publishers and argues that an understanding of the representation of Aboriginal people in thes audiobooks is informed by different aspects of translation and advertisement as well as the format of the medium itself' (Source: Abstract).
The Itinerant Text : Walking between the Lines with Stephen Muecke and Mark Minchinton Michèle Grossman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 78-90)
Listening to Indigenous Voices : The Ethics of Reading in the Teaching of Australian Indigenous Oral Narrative Russell West-Pavlov , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transcultural Graffiti : Diasporic Writing and the Teaching of Literary Studies 2005; (p. 155-170)
Beyond Orality and Literacy: Textuality, Modernity and Representation in Gularabulu: Stories from the West Kimberley Michèle Grossman , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 81 2004; (p. 59-71; notes 208-210) Boundary Writing : An Exploration of Race, Culture, and Gender Binaries in Contemporary Australia 2006; (p. 149-169)
'In a number of collaborative works of Indigenous life-writing, the historical and theoretical entanglements between orality and literacy ... the spheres of "talk" and "text" ... underwrite the limits and possibilities of such works as part of the broader project of contemporary cross-cultural representation. Paddy Roe's and Stephen Muecke's collaboration in Gularabula has been extremely influential in this field in Australia. Their work has shaped cross-cultural approaches to the genre since its publication in1983. This article revisits Gularabula in order to examine the relationship between talk and text in collaborative Indigenous/non-Indigenous works, and considers some critical responses to these efforts.' (p.59)
Aboriginal Writing Philip Morrissey , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture 2000; (p. 313-320)
Diversity of Paperbacks Hope Hewitt , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 30 January 1993; (p. C8)

— Review of Harbour : Stories by Australian Writers 1993 anthology short story ; Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism ; I Took My Harp to a Party Alexandra Long 1993 selected work short story
Black Gold Tony Maniaty , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 January 1993; (p. rev 6)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Appropriation or Post-Colonial Renaissance Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 163-178)
'In this chapter I am going to advance the thesis that spatial movements, including landscape, everyday 'city spaces', writing and travel, are all closely interrelated, and that the extraordinary mobility of recent creative work by Aboriginal artists constitutes a strong movement towards post-colonisation as it carries a series of implications for the practice of perceiving the land.' (164)
Untitled Peter Williams , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Good Reading Guide 1989; (p. 233)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Reader Response to Transcribed Oral Narrative : A Fortunate Life and My Place Joan Newman , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 48 no. 4 1988; (p. 376-389)

Examines the range of reading practices with regard to the increasingly popular form of written narrative transcribed from oral sources, by comparing different responses to Albert Facey's A Fortunate Life and Morgan's My Place.

Thoughts on Aboriginal Literature Jim Kable , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Aboriginal Child at School , February/March vol. 13 no. 1 1985; (p. 31-52)
Untitled Span , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: Words and Visions , Winter no. 16 1984; (p. 36)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Recording Oral History Beverley Driver , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , May no. 1 1984; (p. 90-91)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Ian Templeman , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Centre Broadsheet , May - June vol. 2 no. 3 1983; (p. 1-2)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Bob Hodge , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , December vol. 28 no. 4 1983; (p. 61-64)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Annette Schmidt , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 42 no. 3 1983; (p. 401-402)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Ian Templeman , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Centre Broadsheet , May - June vol. 2 no. 3 1983; (p. 1-2)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Span , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: Words and Visions , Winter no. 16 1984; (p. 36)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Recording Oral History Beverley Driver , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , May no. 1 1984; (p. 90-91)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Diversity of Paperbacks Hope Hewitt , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 30 January 1993; (p. C8)

— Review of Harbour : Stories by Australian Writers 1993 anthology short story ; Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism ; I Took My Harp to a Party Alexandra Long 1993 selected work short story
Untitled Bob Hodge , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , December vol. 28 no. 4 1983; (p. 61-64)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Annette Schmidt , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 42 no. 3 1983; (p. 401-402)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Untitled Peter Williams , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Good Reading Guide 1989; (p. 233)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Black Gold Tony Maniaty , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 January 1993; (p. rev 6)

— Review of Gularabulu : Stories from the West Kimberley 1983 selected work prose criticism
Beyond Orality and Literacy: Textuality, Modernity and Representation in Gularabulu: Stories from the West Kimberley Michèle Grossman , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 81 2004; (p. 59-71; notes 208-210) Boundary Writing : An Exploration of Race, Culture, and Gender Binaries in Contemporary Australia 2006; (p. 149-169)
'In a number of collaborative works of Indigenous life-writing, the historical and theoretical entanglements between orality and literacy ... the spheres of "talk" and "text" ... underwrite the limits and possibilities of such works as part of the broader project of contemporary cross-cultural representation. Paddy Roe's and Stephen Muecke's collaboration in Gularabula has been extremely influential in this field in Australia. Their work has shaped cross-cultural approaches to the genre since its publication in1983. This article revisits Gularabula in order to examine the relationship between talk and text in collaborative Indigenous/non-Indigenous works, and considers some critical responses to these efforts.' (p.59)
Listening to Indigenous Voices : The Ethics of Reading in the Teaching of Australian Indigenous Oral Narrative Russell West-Pavlov , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transcultural Graffiti : Diasporic Writing and the Teaching of Literary Studies 2005; (p. 155-170)
Thoughts on Aboriginal Literature Jim Kable , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Aboriginal Child at School , February/March vol. 13 no. 1 1985; (p. 31-52)
Aboriginal Literature in Austria: A Discussion of Three Audiobooks Oliver Haag , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2011; (p. 51-64)
'The author discusses the overseas marketing of translated Aboriginal literature which has received scant scholarly attention. The paper examines three examples of Aboriginal literature that have been translated into German and produced as audiobooks by two Austrian publishers...this paper focuses on the translation and promotion of these audiobooks by their Austrian publishers and argues that an understanding of the representation of Aboriginal people in thes audiobooks is informed by different aspects of translation and advertisement as well as the format of the medium itself' (Source: Abstract).
The Itinerant Text : Walking between the Lines with Stephen Muecke and Mark Minchinton Michèle Grossman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 78-90)
Appropriation or Post-Colonial Renaissance Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 163-178)
'In this chapter I am going to advance the thesis that spatial movements, including landscape, everyday 'city spaces', writing and travel, are all closely interrelated, and that the extraordinary mobility of recent creative work by Aboriginal artists constitutes a strong movement towards post-colonisation as it carries a series of implications for the practice of perceiving the land.' (164)
Reader Response to Transcribed Oral Narrative : A Fortunate Life and My Place Joan Newman , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 48 no. 4 1988; (p. 376-389)

Examines the range of reading practices with regard to the increasingly popular form of written narrative transcribed from oral sources, by comparing different responses to Albert Facey's A Fortunate Life and Morgan's My Place.

Aboriginal Writing Philip Morrissey , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture 2000; (p. 313-320)
y Entangled Subjects : Indigenous/Australian Cross-Cultures Of Talk, Text, And Modernity Michèle Grossman , Netherlands : Rodopi , 2013 Z1938856 2013 single work criticism

'Indigenous Australian cultures were long known to the world mainly from the writing of anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, missionaries, and others. Indigenous Australians themselves have worked across a range of genres to challenge and reconfigure this textual legacy, so that they are now strongly represented through their own life-narratives of identity, history, politics, and culture. Even as Indigenous-authored texts have opened up new horizons of engagement with Aboriginal knowledge and representation, however, the textual politics of some of these narratives - particularly when cross-culturally produced or edited - can remain haunted by colonially grounded assumptions about orality and literacy.

Through an examination of key moments in the theorizing of orality and literacy and key texts in cross-culturally produced Indigenous life-writing, Entangled Subjects explores how some of these works can sustain, rather than trouble, the frontier zone established by modernity in relation to 'talk' and 'text'. Yet contemporary Indigenous vernaculars offer radical new approaches to how we might move beyond the orality-literacy 'frontier', and how modernity and the a-modern are productively entangled in the process. ' (Source: Angus & Robertson website www.angusrobertson.com.au)

y Speaking the Earth's Languages : A Theory for Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics Stuart Cooke , New York (City) Amsterdam : Rodopi , 2013 6178076 2013 single work criticism

Speaking the Earth’s Languages brings together for the first time critical discussions of postcolonial poetics from Australia and Chile. The book crosses multiple languages, landscapes, and disciplines, and draws on a wide range of both oral and written poetries, in order to make strong claims about the importance of ‘a nomad poetics’ – not only for understanding Aboriginal or Mapuche writing practices but, more widely, for the problems confronting contemporary literature and politics in colonized landscapes.

The book begins by critiquing canonical examples of non-indigenous postcolonial poetics. Incisive re-readings of two icons of Australian and Chilean poetry, Judith Wright (1915–2000) and Pablo Neruda (1904–1973), provide rich insights into non-indigenous responses to colonization in the wake of modernity. The second half of the book establishes compositional links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, and between such oral and written poetics more generally.

The book’s final part develops an ‘emerging synthesis’ of contemporary Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, with reference to the work of two of the most important avant-garde Aboriginal and Mapuche poets of recent times, Lionel Fogarty (1958–) and Paulo Huirimilla (1973–).

Speaking the Earth’s Languages uses these fascinating links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics as the basis of a deliberately nomadic, open-ended theory for an Australian–Chilean postcolonial poetics. 'The central argument of this book,' the author writes, 'is that a nomadic poetics is essential for a genuinely postcolonial form of habitation, or a habitation of colonized landscapes that doesn’t continue to replicate colonialist ideologies involving indigenous dispossession and environmental exploitation.' [from the publisher's website]

The Case for Gularabulu by Paddy Roe Stuart Cooke , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 15 April 2014;

In this article, Stuart Cooke argues for the merits of Gularabulu: Stories from the West Kimberley.

A Diplomat for the History Wars Stephen Muecke , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'In this experimental reflection on the ‘history wars’ associated with Keith Windschuttle’s writings, the author recruits a storyteller, an ex-diplomat, whose yarning style subtly contests the ‘graphocentrism’ of Windschuttle’s faith in the truth of the written document. For the latter, facts are both enshrined in print, yet forever ‘out there’ in the world innocently waiting to be gathered. Against this, the essay argues that facts are indeed ‘fabricated’– in an appropriation of Windschuttle’s critique of black arm-band historians. Not only fabricated, but well-fabricated1 according to the best protocols and methods of historical research. If historical facts are thus constructed, they must also be institutionally supported so that they can continue to exist, and that too is an on-going negotiation in which diplomacy must also play a part. The negotiation is not between the veracity of facts and the distortions of ideology; peace will never be achieved along that pathway. The real war is between the most cherished values that support the manufacture of the facts that serve the parties involved. The skilled diplomat intervenes to listen to what it is they hold most dear, and then negotiates what they might relinquish to achieve a workable peace.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 15 Apr 2014 11:35:28
Subjects:
  • Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,
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