Dust single work   poetry   "THIS sick dust, spiralling with the wind,"
First known date: 1945 Issue Details: First known date: 1945 1945
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Meanjin Papers vol. 4 no. 1 Autumn 1945 Z596111 1945 periodical issue 1945 pg. 20
  • Appears in:
    y Jindyworobak Anthology, 1946 Ian Mudie (editor), 1946 Z337672 1946 periodical issue 1946 pg. 65-66
  • Appears in:
    y The Moving Image : Poems Judith Wright , Melbourne : Meanjin Press , 1946 Z561140 1946 selected work poetry

    The Moving Image is a collection of poems by Judith Wright.

    Melbourne : Meanjin Press , 1946
  • Appears in:
    y New Song in an Old Land Rex Ingamells (editor), London : Longmans, Green , 1943 Z132802 1943 anthology poetry London : Longmans, Green , 1948 pg. 94-95
  • Appears in:
    y The Oxford Book of Australasian Verse Walter Murdoch (editor), London : Oxford University Press , 1918 Z1021439 1918 anthology poetry A Book of Australian and New Zealand Verse Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1950 pg. 246-247
  • Appears in:
    y Judith Wright : Collected Poems, 1942-1970 Judith Wright , Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1971 Z563360 1971 selected work poetry Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1971 pg. 23-24
  • Appears in:
    y The Land's Meaning L. M. Hannan (editor), B. A. Breen (editor), South Melbourne : Macmillan Australia , 1973 Z873720 1973 anthology poetry South Melbourne : Macmillan Australia , 1973 pg. 59
  • Appears in:
    y The Temperament of Generations : Fifty Years of Writing in Meanjin Jenny Lee (editor), Philip Mead (editor), Gerald Murnane (editor), Carlton South : Meanjin Press Melbourne University Press , 1990 Z371555 1990 anthology criticism poetry short story prose correspondence review 'This is a history of Meanjin, told in its own words...Through a selection of previously unpublished correspondence together with some of the path-breaking writings that were first published in Meanjin, this book takes us on a journey through the magazine's own tempestuous history and charts the cross-currents and conflicts of postwar politics and culture.' (Source: back cover) Carlton South : Meanjin Press Melbourne University Press , 1990 pg. 24-25
  • Appears in:
    y Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright , Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 Z501989 1994 selected work poetry war literature satire (taught in 8 units) Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 pg. 23-24
  • Appears in:
    y Little Book of Weather Michelle Mortimer , Joanna Karmel , Canberra : National Library of Australia , 2011 Z1765141 2011 anthology poetry

    'Little Book of Weather reflects Australians' fascination with the weather of their arid continent: those on the land watch for stormy skies promising to relieve the parched ground, or grieve the loss of the top soil to the wind; those in towns and cities wait for rain to fill up the water tanks and reservoirs. People appreciate the beauty of the snow, of mist in the morning or of light streaming through the clouds. The years come and go, often marked by events that become part of Australian folklore—the 1895 Federation drought, the 1983 Ash Wednesday bushfires in Victoria and South Australia, the 1990 floods in New South Wales and Queensland, the February 7 2009 Victorian bushfires.

    'The latest addition to the National Library of Australia's 'Little Books' series, Little Book of Weather features the work of some of Australia's much-loved poets, including Judith Wright, Les Murray, David Campbell, Mudrooroo, James McAuley, Banjo Paterson and Dorothea Mackellar, along with beautiful images from the Library's collection by Joseph Lycett, Edward Close, Ellis Rowan, Harold Cazneaux, Peter Dombrovskis, Olegas Truchanas, Katherine Nix and others.' (From the publisher's website.)

    Canberra : National Library of Australia , 2011
    pg. 30-31

Works about this Work

Negotiating 'Negative Capability' : The Role of Place in Writing for Two Australian Poets Lynda Hawryluk , Leni Shilton , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , July vol. 4 no. 1 2014; Coolabah , no. 16 2015; (p. 48-73)

'This paper takes its lead from the poet John Keats’ notion of ‘negative capability’ (1891: 48), exploring some of the key methodologies of representing landscapes in writing, specifically using place to effect the process of ‘… being capable of being in uncertainties, Mysteries, doubt, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason …’ (48).

Keats refers to the poet as ‘taking part’ in the life of the poem; and being in the poem. This paper features our own poetry, located in two different landscapes and with its own understanding of place, which captures a sense of connection to rugged and remote terrains. To evoke this sense of connection, Keats’ negative capability comes into play—understood in this paper as a metaphysical space where a meditative state provides the writer with a ‘glimpse’; a recognition of that moment of connection without which ‘poetry cannot happen’ (Oliver 1994: 84)

Our writing, as will be discussed, is individually informed by knowledge about environment and notions of poetic space, where ‘aspects of the unconscious move into consciousness’ (Hetherington 2012: 8). This paper explores the commonalities and distinctions between our work, using brief examples.' (Publication abstract)

Negotiating 'Negative Capability' : The Role of Place in Writing for Two Australian Poets Lynda Hawryluk , Leni Shilton , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , July vol. 4 no. 1 2014; Coolabah , no. 16 2015; (p. 48-73)

'This paper takes its lead from the poet John Keats’ notion of ‘negative capability’ (1891: 48), exploring some of the key methodologies of representing landscapes in writing, specifically using place to effect the process of ‘… being capable of being in uncertainties, Mysteries, doubt, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason …’ (48).

Keats refers to the poet as ‘taking part’ in the life of the poem; and being in the poem. This paper features our own poetry, located in two different landscapes and with its own understanding of place, which captures a sense of connection to rugged and remote terrains. To evoke this sense of connection, Keats’ negative capability comes into play—understood in this paper as a metaphysical space where a meditative state provides the writer with a ‘glimpse’; a recognition of that moment of connection without which ‘poetry cannot happen’ (Oliver 1994: 84)

Our writing, as will be discussed, is individually informed by knowledge about environment and notions of poetic space, where ‘aspects of the unconscious move into consciousness’ (Hetherington 2012: 8). This paper explores the commonalities and distinctions between our work, using brief examples.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 5 May 2011 16:29:40
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