6787189191632321974.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Collected Poems 1942-1985 selected work   poetry   war literature   satire  
Issue Details: First known date: 1994 1994
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1994 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Moving Imagei"Here is the same clock that walked quietly", Judith Wright , 1945 single work poetry (p. 3-6)
Northern Riveri"When summer days grow harsh", Judith Wright (editor), 1971 single work poetry (p. 6-7)
The Company of Loversi"We meet and part now over all the world;", Judith Wright , 1942 single work poetry war literature (p. 7)
Blue Arabi"The small blue Arab stallion dances on the hill", Judith Wright , 1946 single work poetry (p. 8)
Bora Ringi"The song is gone; the dance", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 8)
Trapped Dingoi"So here, twisted in steel, and spoiled with red", Judith Wright , 1927 single work poetry (p. 9)
Waitingi"Day's crystal hemisphere travels the land.", Judith Wright , 1943 single work poetry (p. 9-10)
Remittance Mani"The spendthrift, disinherited and graceless,", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 10-11)
Soldier's Farmi"This ploughland drifted with the smoke of dreams,", Judith Wright , 1943 single work poetry (p. 11-12)
The Trainsi"Tunnelling through the night, the trains pass", Judith Wright , 1943 single work poetry war literature (p. 12)
The Idleri"The treasure islands were his desired landfall:", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 13)
Country Towni"This is no longer the landscape that they knew,", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 13-14)
The Hawthorn Hedgei"How long ago she planted the hawthorn hedge-", Judith Wright , 1945 single work poetry (p. 14-15)
Nigger's Leap : New Englandi"The eastward spurs tip backward from the sun.", Judith Wright , 1945 single work poetry (p. 15-16)
Sonneti"Now let the draughtsman of my eyes be done", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 16)
Bullockyi"Beside his heavy-shouldered team,", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 17)
Brother and Sistersi"The road turned out to be a cul-de-sac;", Judith Wright , 1944 single work poetry (p. 18)
Half-Caste Girli"Little Josie buried under the bright moon", Judith Wright , 1971 single work poetry (p. 19)
South of My Daysi"South of my days' circle, part of my blood's country,", Judith Wright , 1943-1945 single work poetry (p. 20-21)
The Surferi"He thrust his joy against the weight of the sea,", Judith Wright , 1945 single work poetry (p. 21-22)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Manchester,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Carcanet , 1994 .
      Alternative title: Judith Wright : collected poems 1942-1985
      Extent: 436p.
      ISBN: 1857540891
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2016 .
      6787189191632321974.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 432p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 23 May 2016
      ISBN: 9781460752364

Works about this Work

A Century’s Worth of Passions Felicity Plunkett , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 21)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Phillip Hall Reviews Judith Wright, Georgina Arnott and Katie Noonan Phillip Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite , October no. 55.1 2016;

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; The Unknown Judith Wright Georgie Arnott 2016 single work biography ; With Love and Fury Judith Wright 2016 selected work lyric/song
Colonial Knowledge, Post-Colonial Poetics Lyn McCredden , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 255-277)
A Booklist of International Environmental Literature : Australia Ruth Blair , 2009 single work bibliography
— Appears in: World Literature Today , January/February vol. 83 no. 1 2009; (p. 54-55)
Ruth Blair's compilation of five classics of Australian envornmental literature for an international booklist coordinate by Scott Slovic.
y The God-Shaped Hole : Responding to the Good News in Australia Veronica Brady , Adelaide : ATF Press , 2008 Z1533434 2008 selected work criticism This book brings together a selection of Veronica Brady's critical addresses arguing that there are novels and poems that bear witness to the mystery of 'God' or an 'Other' who speaks through others.
Are there Really Angels in Carlton? Australian Literature and Theology Noel Rowe , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ethical Investigations : Essays on Australian Literature and Poetics 2008; (p. 30-59)
Being True to the Earth - In Peril : Finding a Voice to Touch the Heart Nonie Sharp , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 5 2008; (p. 47-58)
'The author uses literature, past and present, to highlight concerns regarding the degradation of the natural world. Of particular concern is the apparent lack of focus by governments in tackling global warming. The artist's role in defining, describing and lamenting the degradation of the natural world is explored.' (Editor's abstract)
Ancestral Echoes : Spectres of the Past in Judith Wright's Poetry Sue King-Smith , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 117-129)

Sue King-Smith says: 'There are three main spectres in Wright's poetry that this article addresses. The first relates to the loss and separation Wright experienced when she became aware of the history of the land she had felt a profound sense of identification with since early childhood ... The second spectre relates to the traces of Aboriginal massacres and dispossessions. And the third is the spectre of the indigenous landscape that existed prior to British occupation, with a substantial number of indigenous species of flora and fauna now extinct.

'This article will argue that these spectres are intimately linked in Wright's writing and that her poetic and private relationships with the Australian landscape are constantly mediated by the need to acknowledge these ghosts.' (pp.117-118)

The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
The Environmental Ethics of Australian Nature Poems Norbert H. Platz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 81-101)
‘The basic contention inspiring this paper is: poets care about Australia’s physical environment and human survival in Australia. Australian literature contains a substantial body of knowledge that could be deployed to constitute the imaginative core of an environmental ethic. Thus a great many Australian literary texts could be studied with the purpose of helping to usher in the desirable concept of an environmentally literate community. The essay is divided into two sections. Section one will provide a brief survey of environmental ethics. This survey is followed by the exposition of six deontic or prescriptive outlines, to be supplemented by some eudaemonic considerations. The latter envisage the notion of the ‘good life,’ in harmony with nature. In section two, important insights furnished by environmental ethics will be used as an orientation towards identifying the environmental concerns shown in a variety of Australian nature poems. Among the authors considered are Bruce Dawe, Dorothy Hewett, John Kinsella, Mark O’Connor, John Shaw Neilson, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker), and last but not least Judith Wright. As will be seen, there are many convergences and correspondences between the basic claims made by environmental ethics, and the environmental insights and experiences that have been accumulated in a noteworthy corpus of Australian nature poems. What is enshrined in these poems is the ‘collective prudence,’ not only of a cultural elite, but also of the modern Everyman.’ (Author’s abstract p.81)
The Poetry of Judith Wright and Sylvia Plath : Some Points of Comparison Keya Majumdar , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Austral-Asian Encounters : From Literature and Women's Studies to Politics and Tourism 2003; (p. 430-440)
My Favorite Book : Rosie Scott Dianne Dempsey , 1996 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 May 1996; (p. 8)
Rubbing up Life : The Poetry of Judith Wright Nella Bureu , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Spanish Sampler of Australian Studies 1996; (p. 15-23)
Books Read Since the End of November 1994 Bruce Gillespie , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Scratch Pad 12 , August 1995; (p. 1-3)

— Review of Crosskill : A Wyatt Novel Garry Disher 1994 single work novel ; A Window in Mrs X's Place : Selected Short Stories Peter Cowan 1986 selected work short story ; Cutting Green Hay : Friendships, Movements and Cultural Conflicts in Australia's Great Decades Vincent Buckley 1983 single work autobiography ; The Pure Land David Foster 1974 single work novel ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; Love Lies Bleeding : A Crimes For a Summer Christmas Anthology 1994 anthology short story ; Australia's First Fabians : Middle-Class Radicals, Labour Activists and the Early Labour Movement ; Foreword by Gough Whitlam Race Mathews E. G. Whitlam 1993 single work biography ; Our Lady of Chernobyl Greg Egan 1995 selected work short story ; Reading by Starlight: Postmodern Science Fiction Damien Broderick 1995 single work criticism ; Mirrorsun Rising Sean McMullen 1995 single work novel
y Judith Wright Jennifer Strauss , South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1995 Z451414 1995 single work criticism
Untitled Helene Brophy , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Multicultural Book Review , vol. 3 no. 1 1995; (p. 38-40)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Like a Perfectly Cast Bell Christopher Pollnitz , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 April 1994; (p. rev 7)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Compasses of Love Jennifer Strauss , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 7 May 1994; (p. 8)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; Peninsula Dorothy Hewett 1994 selected work poetry
Untitled Shirley Walker , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , Winter vol. 39 no. 2 1994; (p. 91-93)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
A Poet's Life of Sweeping Themes Heather Cam , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 March 1994; (p. 11A)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Books Read Since the End of November 1994 Bruce Gillespie , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Scratch Pad 12 , August 1995; (p. 1-3)

— Review of Crosskill : A Wyatt Novel Garry Disher 1994 single work novel ; A Window in Mrs X's Place : Selected Short Stories Peter Cowan 1986 selected work short story ; Cutting Green Hay : Friendships, Movements and Cultural Conflicts in Australia's Great Decades Vincent Buckley 1983 single work autobiography ; The Pure Land David Foster 1974 single work novel ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; Love Lies Bleeding : A Crimes For a Summer Christmas Anthology 1994 anthology short story ; Australia's First Fabians : Middle-Class Radicals, Labour Activists and the Early Labour Movement ; Foreword by Gough Whitlam Race Mathews E. G. Whitlam 1993 single work biography ; Our Lady of Chernobyl Greg Egan 1995 selected work short story ; Reading by Starlight: Postmodern Science Fiction Damien Broderick 1995 single work criticism ; Mirrorsun Rising Sean McMullen 1995 single work novel
Like a Perfectly Cast Bell Christopher Pollnitz , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 April 1994; (p. rev 7)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Compasses of Love Jennifer Strauss , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 7 May 1994; (p. 8)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; Peninsula Dorothy Hewett 1994 selected work poetry
Untitled Shirley Walker , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , Winter vol. 39 no. 2 1994; (p. 91-93)

— Review of The Flame Tree Judith Wright Sakai Nobuo (translator), Meredith McKinney (translator), 1993 selected work poetry ; Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
A Poet's Life of Sweeping Themes Heather Cam , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 March 1994; (p. 11A)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Why Wright Will Endure Geoffrey Dutton , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 164 1994; (p. 44-45)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Untitled Helene Brophy , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Multicultural Book Review , vol. 3 no. 1 1995; (p. 38-40)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
A Century’s Worth of Passions Felicity Plunkett , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 21)

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry
Phillip Hall Reviews Judith Wright, Georgina Arnott and Katie Noonan Phillip Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite , October no. 55.1 2016;

— Review of Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright 1994 selected work poetry ; The Unknown Judith Wright Georgie Arnott 2016 single work biography ; With Love and Fury Judith Wright 2016 selected work lyric/song
The Poetry of Judith Wright and Sylvia Plath : Some Points of Comparison Keya Majumdar , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Austral-Asian Encounters : From Literature and Women's Studies to Politics and Tourism 2003; (p. 430-440)
Ancestral Echoes : Spectres of the Past in Judith Wright's Poetry Sue King-Smith , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 117-129)

Sue King-Smith says: 'There are three main spectres in Wright's poetry that this article addresses. The first relates to the loss and separation Wright experienced when she became aware of the history of the land she had felt a profound sense of identification with since early childhood ... The second spectre relates to the traces of Aboriginal massacres and dispossessions. And the third is the spectre of the indigenous landscape that existed prior to British occupation, with a substantial number of indigenous species of flora and fauna now extinct.

'This article will argue that these spectres are intimately linked in Wright's writing and that her poetic and private relationships with the Australian landscape are constantly mediated by the need to acknowledge these ghosts.' (pp.117-118)

y The God-Shaped Hole : Responding to the Good News in Australia Veronica Brady , Adelaide : ATF Press , 2008 Z1533434 2008 selected work criticism This book brings together a selection of Veronica Brady's critical addresses arguing that there are novels and poems that bear witness to the mystery of 'God' or an 'Other' who speaks through others.
Are there Really Angels in Carlton? Australian Literature and Theology Noel Rowe , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ethical Investigations : Essays on Australian Literature and Poetics 2008; (p. 30-59)
Colonial Knowledge, Post-Colonial Poetics Lyn McCredden , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 255-277)
A Booklist of International Environmental Literature : Australia Ruth Blair , 2009 single work bibliography
— Appears in: World Literature Today , January/February vol. 83 no. 1 2009; (p. 54-55)
Ruth Blair's compilation of five classics of Australian envornmental literature for an international booklist coordinate by Scott Slovic.
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
The Environmental Ethics of Australian Nature Poems Norbert H. Platz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 81-101)
‘The basic contention inspiring this paper is: poets care about Australia’s physical environment and human survival in Australia. Australian literature contains a substantial body of knowledge that could be deployed to constitute the imaginative core of an environmental ethic. Thus a great many Australian literary texts could be studied with the purpose of helping to usher in the desirable concept of an environmentally literate community. The essay is divided into two sections. Section one will provide a brief survey of environmental ethics. This survey is followed by the exposition of six deontic or prescriptive outlines, to be supplemented by some eudaemonic considerations. The latter envisage the notion of the ‘good life,’ in harmony with nature. In section two, important insights furnished by environmental ethics will be used as an orientation towards identifying the environmental concerns shown in a variety of Australian nature poems. Among the authors considered are Bruce Dawe, Dorothy Hewett, John Kinsella, Mark O’Connor, John Shaw Neilson, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker), and last but not least Judith Wright. As will be seen, there are many convergences and correspondences between the basic claims made by environmental ethics, and the environmental insights and experiences that have been accumulated in a noteworthy corpus of Australian nature poems. What is enshrined in these poems is the ‘collective prudence,’ not only of a cultural elite, but also of the modern Everyman.’ (Author’s abstract p.81)
Being True to the Earth - In Peril : Finding a Voice to Touch the Heart Nonie Sharp , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 5 2008; (p. 47-58)
'The author uses literature, past and present, to highlight concerns regarding the degradation of the natural world. Of particular concern is the apparent lack of focus by governments in tackling global warming. The artist's role in defining, describing and lamenting the degradation of the natural world is explored.' (Editor's abstract)
y Judith Wright Jennifer Strauss , South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1995 Z451414 1995 single work criticism
My Favorite Book : Rosie Scott Dianne Dempsey , 1996 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 May 1996; (p. 8)
Rubbing up Life : The Poetry of Judith Wright Nella Bureu , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Spanish Sampler of Australian Studies 1996; (p. 15-23)
Last amended 22 Aug 2016 09:12:34
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