y Wild Cat Falling single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1965 1965
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Adaptations

Wild Cat Falling Mudrooroo , 1992 single work drama

'Nineteen-year old anti-hero Wildcat has been released from Fremantle Jail after serving an eighteen-month sentence for juvenile offences. The play shifts from real time to memory as Wildcat re-experiences growing up in a small country town, being sent to Swanview Boys' Home and being a member of a bodgie gang in Perth in the late 1950s.' (Source: Australian Plays website)

Notes

  • A stage production, adapted and directed by Alan Becher with music by David Milroy, was performed in 1992. Reviews of that production are attached to this record.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Gatto Selvaggio Cade
Language: Italian

Works about this Work

The Postcolonial Autobiography : Force Majeure? Aurélia Mouzet , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Autobiography as a Writing Strategy in Postcolonial Literature 2015; (p. 161-178)
y Wild Cat Falling, Mudrooroo : In the Context of Identity and Belonging Angie Barillaro , Essendon North : Radiant Heart Publishing , 2015 8919410 2015 single work criticism
The Yellow House Mudrooroo , 2014 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 3 2014; (p. 62-76)
y Exploring Issues of Identity and Belonging Bruce Pattinson , Seven Hills : Five Senses Education , 2014 9010570 2014 selected work criticism

'Study notes and a workshop approach to Ray Lawler's Summer of the Seventeenth Doll, Patti Miller's The Mind of the Thief, Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling, Anthony Fabian's Skin.' (Publication summary)

Aboriginal Affair(s): Reflections on the Life of Mudrooroo Eva Rask Knudsen , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: LINQ , December no. 39 2012; (p. 105-115)

'The article reviews the controversial 'Mudrooroo Affair' with reference to unpublished work by Mudrooroo in which he comments on the public debate about his rights to define himself as Aboriginal and, by extension, have his work credited as Aboriginal. Such work makes it pertinent to review Mudrooroo's creative output since 1965 as literary experiments with life writing and to reconsider Mudrooroo's many literary 'performances' from this perspective. They are not only explorations of Aboriginal identity politics over,- the last five decades, but may also be seen as a far more personal investment in exploring Aboriginal identity through a progressively shifting but interrelated series of subjectivities that reflect the writer's own experience and inform his claim to Aboriginality.' (Publication summary)

Religious Identity in Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling Yong-chun Yang , Xu Xian-jing , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: US-China Foreign Language , June vol. 9 no. 6 2011; (p. 398-403)
'The dreaming is still there and deeply influences the Aboriginal world view and life view—epistemology and ontology. Dreaming is the law, spiritual identity and custodial ethic toward the land. Dreaming is one of the most important keynote themes in aboriginal creative writing. This paper is meant to handle the theme of dreaming as religious identity in Mudrooroo's most important representative work, Wild Cat Falling (1992), from the perspective of identity construction such as kinship and walkabout and identity resistance.' (Editor's abstract)
Working-Class Youth Subcultures : Resistance and Expolitation in Criena Rohan's The Delinquents and Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling Ian Herbertson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;
'Of the small group of Australian novels written from beneath the shiny surface of late 50s and early 60s youth styles - reports from underground, stamped with 'insider' authority - none observed the intellectual uncertainties of a new order more acutely than Criena Rohan's The Delinquents (1962) and Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling (1965). Both hinged on an intriguing paradox: on the one hand they eagerly accepted that youth subcultures were the source of new identities, less welded to traditional class alignments; but they also contained some of the darkest interpretations of the relationship between youth and the culture industries which provided the raw material for subcultural styles. Their radical depiction of youth's energy and popular culture's allure was undercut by troubled equivocations, or doubts, that youth could creatively use mass popular culture to resist or undermine the power of the dominant capitalist order that produced it.' (Author's abstract)
Identity and Belonging in Mudrooroo’s Wild Cat Falling Ghatak Antara , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities , vol. 2 no. 2 2010; (p. 154-161)
'Wild Cat Falling, the rebellious, anti-colonial story by the black Australian author, Mudrooroo, tells us what 'belonging' means in Australia, when one is other than white. Written in an autobiographical mode, Mudrooroo's first novel, Wild Cat Falling is an avant-garde as it presents an interventionist discourse for the first time in the literary history of Australia directed towards opening up the space for self-determined representation by an Aboriginal. The novel retells the continuing entrapment of the Indigenous minority in an inequitable network of social, economic and cultural relationship that they have inherited from British conquest. This paper explores how the issues of identity and belonging make Wild Cat Falling an important interventionist discourse.' (Author's abstract, p. 154).
y The Whiteman's Aborigine Jeanine Leane , Sydney : 2010 Z1934839 2010 single work thesis
'Blackfella Loving' Ronald M. Berndt , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 317-340)
Readers' Rites : Surpassing Style Ian Henderson , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Politics and Poetics of Passage in Canadian and Australian Culture and Fiction 2006; (p. 101-116)
'A passer who recognises and admires another's equally convincing performance both succumbs to the other's superficial show and perceives the concealed techniques of its production: it is a matter of fully appreciating the other's style. So too certain narratives of passing oblige readers to negotiate a rite of passage through their conspicuous style: the mode of presentation becomes as important as the story the writer has fashioned and must be met with a style-conscious, paradoxical reading strategy for the tale to "tell". [...] In this chapter I will explore the reader's rites of passage in these two texts [Wild Cat Falling and Beneath Clouds], particularly as they impact upon the non-Indigenous reader, articulating the relevance of style to their comment upon racial identity.' -- From the author's introductory paragraph.
Identities and Cultures - John Muk Muk Burke John Muk Muk Burke , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: Voices and Spaces : Indigenous and Multicultural Writers in Dialogue 2006; (p. 78-86)
Indigenous Writing/Indigenous Politics : Rights, Writers and Kim Scott's 'Benang' Delys Bird , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconciliations 2005; (p. 109-118) Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 225-232)
Delys Bird discusses issues of essentialism and authenticity as applied to Aboriginal writing. She looks at examples of non-Aboriginal editing or framing of Aboriginal texts before moving to an extended reading of Benang and how the novel negotiates between - and complicates - ideas of orality and writing and Indigenous and non-Indigenous representation and identity.
Voice of Australia: Who Speaks for the Aborigine? Anjali Gera Roy , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Interfaces 2004; (p. 18-29)
Roy examines the 'legitimacy of the speaking subject' and concludes that 'If the speaking status of the aboriginal writer is legitimised merely by identity markers like whiteness and blackness, non-aboriginal writers like Wositzky would naturally be denied entry. However, they could claim speaking rights by speaking space of writing. Mudrooroo or Morgan are no more privileged than Wositzky in articulating primordial aboriginal identities. On the other hand, finding a vantage point in the discursive space of orality can help them archive, if not recover, aboriginal voice.'
Mudrooroo : Crafty Imposter or Rebel with a Cause Maureen Clark , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 101-110)
From 'Black' Caesar to Mudrooroo : The African Diaspora in Australia Cassandra Pybus , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 25-41)
Reality Rights in the Wildcat Trilogy Maureen Clark , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 43-64)
A Classic Case of Being Short Changed Jane Sullivan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 27 May 2001; (p. 10)
Unmasking Mudrooroo Maureen Clark , 2001 single work essay criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 23 no. 2 2001; (p. 48-62)
The author investigates the authenticity of Mudrooroo's claims to Aboriginal heritage and "stolen generation" institutionalised childhood, noting Mudrooroo's sister's account of their family background, and discussing what actually constitutes Aboriginal identity. She notes similarities between Mudrooroo and the historical George Augustus Robinson, who features in various forms in his novels.
Untitled Greg Hughes , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , no. 3 2001; Journal of Australian Studies , no. 70 2001; (p. 118-120)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
The Long and the Short R. G. Geering , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 25 no. 2 1965; (p. 141-143)

— Review of Harry's Child Suzanne Holly Jones 1964 single work novel ; No Saddles for Kangaroos : A Novel Ralph De Boissiere 1964 single work novel ; Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
New Novels John McLaren , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 32 1965; (p. 43-45)

— Review of Harry's Child Suzanne Holly Jones 1964 single work novel ; Across the Sea Wall Christopher Koch 1965 single work novel ; Mayor's Nest Tony Morphett 1964 single work novel ; Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled Adam Shoemaker , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , November vol. 4 no. 3 1992; (p. 91-92)

— Review of Real Deadly Ruby Langford Ginibi 1992 selected work poetry prose extract ; Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled F. M. (fl. 1955-1970) , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Advocate: A Weekly Catholic Journal , 1 April 1965; (p. 18)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled Alec King , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , May no. 1 1965; (p. 70-71)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled Scrutarius , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , vol. 31 no. 6 1965; (p. 45)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
A Voice from Shanty Town Lynne Strahan , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , September vol. 24 no. 3 1965; (p. 385-386)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled Derek Whitelock , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May vol. 4 no. 7 1965; (p. 127)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
The Search for Love Christopher Koch , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 1 May vol. 87 no. 4444 1965; (p. 54-56)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
New Paperbacks Robin Lucas , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18 August 1990; (p. 75)

— Review of Oceana Fine Tom Flood 1989 single work novel ; The Slow Natives Thea Astley 1965 single work novel ; Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Collapsing Into Himself Suzanne Ruta , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 9 January 1994; (p. 21)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel ; Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo 1992 single work novel
A Pallid Passage from Page to Stage Bob Evans , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6 June 1994; (p. 25)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
Untitled Greg Hughes , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , no. 3 2001; Journal of Australian Studies , no. 70 2001; (p. 118-120)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel
'Classic' Reissues Elizabeth Webby , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , July no. 232 2001; (p. 44-45)

— Review of Henry Lawson : Selected Stories Henry Lawson 2001 selected work short story ; Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson 1965 single work novel ; The Pea Pickers Eve Langley 1942 single work novel ; Ride on Stranger Kylie Tennant 1943 single work novel ; Come in Spinner Florence James Dymphna Cusack 1951 single work novel ; My Brilliant Career Miles Franklin 1901 single work novel ; The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel ; Clean Straw for Nothing [and] A Cartload of Clay George Johnston 1989 selected work novel
y Aboriginal Experience Lloyd Cameron , Glebe : Pascal Press , 1994 Z1019180 1994 single work criticism
form y Aboriginal Experience Martin Didsbury , 1994 Z1019197 1994 single work film/TV

'The stories told by Ruby Langford Ginibi in Don't Take Your Love to Town, Sally Morgan My Place, and Mudrooroo in Wild Cat Falling provide the starting point for discussions on some of the key events and issues that have affected Aboriginal people.

Part 1: 'Aboriginal Experience' looks at the practice of removing Aboriginal children from their families, and denial of Aboriginality and equal rights. Part 2: 'Reclaiming Identity' looks at the importance of the family and the land to Aboriginal people and their quest to reclaim their identity.'

From 'Black' Caesar to Mudrooroo : The African Diaspora in Australia Cassandra Pybus , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 25-41)
Reality Rights in the Wildcat Trilogy Maureen Clark , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 43-64)
Voice of Australia: Who Speaks for the Aborigine? Anjali Gera Roy , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Interfaces 2004; (p. 18-29)
Roy examines the 'legitimacy of the speaking subject' and concludes that 'If the speaking status of the aboriginal writer is legitimised merely by identity markers like whiteness and blackness, non-aboriginal writers like Wositzky would naturally be denied entry. However, they could claim speaking rights by speaking space of writing. Mudrooroo or Morgan are no more privileged than Wositzky in articulating primordial aboriginal identities. On the other hand, finding a vantage point in the discursive space of orality can help them archive, if not recover, aboriginal voice.'
Mudrooroo : Crafty Imposter or Rebel with a Cause Maureen Clark , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 101-110)
Indigenous Writing/Indigenous Politics : Rights, Writers and Kim Scott's 'Benang' Delys Bird , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconciliations 2005; (p. 109-118) Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 225-232)
Delys Bird discusses issues of essentialism and authenticity as applied to Aboriginal writing. She looks at examples of non-Aboriginal editing or framing of Aboriginal texts before moving to an extended reading of Benang and how the novel negotiates between - and complicates - ideas of orality and writing and Indigenous and non-Indigenous representation and identity.
Readers' Rites : Surpassing Style Ian Henderson , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Politics and Poetics of Passage in Canadian and Australian Culture and Fiction 2006; (p. 101-116)
'A passer who recognises and admires another's equally convincing performance both succumbs to the other's superficial show and perceives the concealed techniques of its production: it is a matter of fully appreciating the other's style. So too certain narratives of passing oblige readers to negotiate a rite of passage through their conspicuous style: the mode of presentation becomes as important as the story the writer has fashioned and must be met with a style-conscious, paradoxical reading strategy for the tale to "tell". [...] In this chapter I will explore the reader's rites of passage in these two texts [Wild Cat Falling and Beneath Clouds], particularly as they impact upon the non-Indigenous reader, articulating the relevance of style to their comment upon racial identity.' -- From the author's introductory paragraph.
Colin Johnson : A Survey Susan Ballyn , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth Literary Cultures : New Voices, New Approaches : Conference Papers, Lecce, 3-7 April, 1990 1993; (p. 419-428)
'Return' in Australian Fiction Gay Raines , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: 'Return' in Post-Colonial Writing : A Cultural Labyrinth 1994; (p. 41-49)
y Mudrooroo's 'Wild Cat Falling' Rick McLean , Glebe : Pascal Press , 1994 Z1612053 1994 single work criticism
y A Text Response Guide to Wild Cat Falling by Mudrooroo (Colin Johnson) Susan Perry , Ballarat : Wizard Books , 1993 Z1612203 1993 single work criticism
'Blackfella Loving' Ronald M. Berndt , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 317-340)
Working-Class Youth Subcultures : Resistance and Expolitation in Criena Rohan's The Delinquents and Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling Ian Herbertson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;
'Of the small group of Australian novels written from beneath the shiny surface of late 50s and early 60s youth styles - reports from underground, stamped with 'insider' authority - none observed the intellectual uncertainties of a new order more acutely than Criena Rohan's The Delinquents (1962) and Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling (1965). Both hinged on an intriguing paradox: on the one hand they eagerly accepted that youth subcultures were the source of new identities, less welded to traditional class alignments; but they also contained some of the darkest interpretations of the relationship between youth and the culture industries which provided the raw material for subcultural styles. Their radical depiction of youth's energy and popular culture's allure was undercut by troubled equivocations, or doubts, that youth could creatively use mass popular culture to resist or undermine the power of the dominant capitalist order that produced it.' (Author's abstract)
Aboriginal Representations in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
y Culture, Race and Identity : Australian Aboriginal Writing Chris Weedon , London : Menzies Centre for Australian Studies , 1990 Z1792725 1990 single work criticism 'This paper looks at the relationship between culture, race and identity in English-language Aboriginal writing from Western Australia.' (p. 1)
Identity and Belonging in Mudrooroo’s Wild Cat Falling Ghatak Antara , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities , vol. 2 no. 2 2010; (p. 154-161)
'Wild Cat Falling, the rebellious, anti-colonial story by the black Australian author, Mudrooroo, tells us what 'belonging' means in Australia, when one is other than white. Written in an autobiographical mode, Mudrooroo's first novel, Wild Cat Falling is an avant-garde as it presents an interventionist discourse for the first time in the literary history of Australia directed towards opening up the space for self-determined representation by an Aboriginal. The novel retells the continuing entrapment of the Indigenous minority in an inequitable network of social, economic and cultural relationship that they have inherited from British conquest. This paper explores how the issues of identity and belonging make Wild Cat Falling an important interventionist discourse.' (Author's abstract, p. 154).
Available Discourses on Aborigines Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 19-35)
'This chapter will argue that Aboriginality is constructed in discourse. It will argue that whatever 'Aboriginality' is, it has never always been the same thing from one tribal group to another, from ancient times to the present, or even - according to some legal definitions - the same thing from one State of Australia to another.' (19)
Literature and Politics - The Repressive Hypothesis Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 119-138)
'This chapter will have two interconnected themes. The first will deal with the theoretical problem of 'expression', as part of a literary aesthetic. The main question here will be posed in terms of Aboriginal literature. How can we determine to what extent it is the expression of political activity as has so often been claimed? What can we learn from the case of Aboriginal literature which may in some way contribute to ongoing literature/politics debates?

The second theme will examine on particular genre, autobiography, and two specific books. Out of what historical and social context did My Place and Wandering Girl emerge? What sort of political valency can be attached to them in their conditions of production and consumption?' (119)
Religious Identity in Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Falling Yong-chun Yang , Xu Xian-jing , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: US-China Foreign Language , June vol. 9 no. 6 2011; (p. 398-403)
'The dreaming is still there and deeply influences the Aboriginal world view and life view—epistemology and ontology. Dreaming is the law, spiritual identity and custodial ethic toward the land. Dreaming is one of the most important keynote themes in aboriginal creative writing. This paper is meant to handle the theme of dreaming as religious identity in Mudrooroo's most important representative work, Wild Cat Falling (1992), from the perspective of identity construction such as kinship and walkabout and identity resistance.' (Editor's abstract)
Last amended 28 Nov 2006 08:58:47
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