Telling Mrs Baker single work   short story  
  • Author: Henry Lawson http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/lawson-henry
First known date: 1902 Issue Details: First known date: 1902 1902
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Two drovers, Andy and Jack, watch their boss drink himself to death. They lie to his wife about the cause of his death to spare her unnecessary pain.

Notes

  • Adapted by Vance Palmer for the radio drama Telling Mrs Baker.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Challenge of the Meta-Contextual : Henry Lawson's ‘Telling Mrs Baker’ (1901) and Some Animal Questions for Australia Timothy Clark , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oxford Literary Review , July vol. 29 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 17-36)
The 1890s: Australian Literature and Literary Culture : Introduction Ken A. Stewart , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The 1890s : Australian Literature and Literary Culture 1996; (p. 1-26)
Looking for Mr Backbone : The Politics of Gender in the Work of Henry Lawson Christopher Lee , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The 1890s : Australian Literature and Literary Culture 1996; (p. 95-108)
Telling the Little Women from the Disappearing Woman Maureen Bettle , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Redoubt , August no. 12 1991; (p. 73-77)
Grim Humour in Short Stories of the 1890s Robert S. White , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aspects of Australian Fiction : Essays Presented to John Colmer, Professor Emeritus of English, The University of Adelaide 1990; (p. 17-39)
Themes and Conventions John Barnes , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: Henry Lawson's Short Stories 1985; (p. 26-31)
Mateship, Individualism and the Production of Character in Australian Fiction Graeme Turner , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 11 no. 4 1984; (p. 447-457)
Examines the mode of characterisation prevalent in Australian fiction, a mode which presents character as "the product of social, extrinsic determinants rather than as the expression of an individuated, intrinsic self" (447). Argues that the prominence of this mode of characterisation in Australian narrative tradition undermines familiar assumptions about the centrality of individualism to the the literary version of Australian national or personal identity. The literary convention of mateship is particularly dependent on a representation of character ideologically opposed to the concept of individualism and the individual. Stories by Henry Lawson and Patrick White provide examples to support the argument that character in Australian literature is mainly used as "a way of depicting the intrinsic self, not of the character, but of the society which produces them" (456).
The Challenge of the Meta-Contextual : Henry Lawson's ‘Telling Mrs Baker’ (1901) and Some Animal Questions for Australia Timothy Clark , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oxford Literary Review , July vol. 29 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 17-36)
Telling the Little Women from the Disappearing Woman Maureen Bettle , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Redoubt , August no. 12 1991; (p. 73-77)
Grim Humour in Short Stories of the 1890s Robert S. White , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aspects of Australian Fiction : Essays Presented to John Colmer, Professor Emeritus of English, The University of Adelaide 1990; (p. 17-39)
The 1890s: Australian Literature and Literary Culture : Introduction Ken A. Stewart , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The 1890s : Australian Literature and Literary Culture 1996; (p. 1-26)
Looking for Mr Backbone : The Politics of Gender in the Work of Henry Lawson Christopher Lee , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The 1890s : Australian Literature and Literary Culture 1996; (p. 95-108)
Themes and Conventions John Barnes , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: Henry Lawson's Short Stories 1985; (p. 26-31)
Mateship, Individualism and the Production of Character in Australian Fiction Graeme Turner , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 11 no. 4 1984; (p. 447-457)
Examines the mode of characterisation prevalent in Australian fiction, a mode which presents character as "the product of social, extrinsic determinants rather than as the expression of an individuated, intrinsic self" (447). Argues that the prominence of this mode of characterisation in Australian narrative tradition undermines familiar assumptions about the centrality of individualism to the the literary version of Australian national or personal identity. The literary convention of mateship is particularly dependent on a representation of character ideologically opposed to the concept of individualism and the individual. Stories by Henry Lawson and Patrick White provide examples to support the argument that character in Australian literature is mainly used as "a way of depicting the intrinsic self, not of the character, but of the society which produces them" (456).
Last amended 9 Aug 2010 09:34:33
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