y A Change of Skies single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1991 1991
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Chippendale, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 1991 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Silver and Gold : A Modern Australian Ballad: For Patricia and George Lawson, 5 September 1988i"Said George Lawson to his Missus", Yasmine Gooneratne , 1991 single work poetry (p. 290-291)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Also published in sound recording format.

Works about this Work

Untitled Sonya Ghosh , single work review
— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
A Glow in a Patchwork Sky S. Muthiah , single work review
— Appears in: Indian Review of Books (p. 51-52 (copy held AUSTLIT))

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Gleanings K. S. Sivakumaran , single work review
— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
There Goes the Neighbourhood! : The Indian-Subcontinental in the Asian / Australian Literary Precinct Mridula Nath Chakraborty , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 2 2012;
This paper intervenes in the ongoing debate about the nature of Asian Australian Writing, a debate that started sometime circa 2000s and seems to have gathered some force with the putative rise of global Asia. In its early stages, the referent for this academic debate was Asian-American Studies and whether or not it made sense for such a trans-Atlantic term to be applied to the Antipodean region. In the last decade, Australia’s position within the Asian geo-political region has been increasingly articulated with respect to bilateral exchange with its immediate neighbours, mainly in the arena of trade and security. Writing this essay in 2012, it seems that the two strands, the academic and the geographical, have strategically merged to define the parametres of Asian Australian Writing. [First paragraph of the article]
Eating One’s Way Through History : Food and Politics in Manuka Wijesinghe’s Monsoons and Potholes Isabel Alonso-Breto , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
'This paper consists of an analysis of Monsoons and Potholes (2006), the first novel by Sri Lankan playwright Manuka Wijesinghe. Attention is paid to the ways in which the text articulates relations between personal stories, food, history and politics. Food plays a central role in some novels published in the last years by Sri Lankan authors, as is the case, for instance, with Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies (1984) and Mary Ann Mohanraj's Bodies in Motion (2005). Both these works elaborate metaphors of identity through the dominant trope of food-encompassing cooking and the rituals of consumption. In Monsoons and Potholes, food accompanies and illustrates the autobiographical account of a Sri Lankan youngster born in the early 1960s, and revisits the first twenty years in her life together with the socio-political up and downs in her country. While it is a novel which to a great extent draws on metaphors of myth and history, scenes of food and eating appear consistently throughout the narration, which contribute in providing a down-to-earth (and highly satirical) version of the life of the Sinhala upper-middle classes during the period. These images of food (and the sets of rituals, beliefs and constrictions around it) are exploited by the author with the aim to explore, understand and denounce the historical process which precipitated Sri Lanka, at the beginning of the 1980s, "on the road to nowhere".' (Author's abstract)
y A Translation of Worlds: Aspects of Cultural Translation and Australian Migration Literature. Anette Svensson , Umea : Umea University, Dept of Language Studies , 2010 Z1676807 2010 single work criticism

This study explores the exchange of cultural information that takes place in the meeting between immigrant and non-immigrant characters in a selection of Australian novels focusing on the theme of migration: Heartland (1989) by Angelika Fremd, A Change of Skies (1991) by Yasmine Gooneratne, Stella's Place (1998) by Jim Sakkas, Hiam (1998) by Eva Sallis and Love and Vertigo (2000) by Hsu-Ming Teo.

The concept cultural translation functions as a theoretical tool in the analyses. The translation model is particularly useful for this purpose since it parallels the migration process and emphasises the power relations involved in cultural encounters. Within the framework of the study, cultural translation is defined as making an unfamiliar cultural phenomenon familiar to someone. On the intratextual level of the text, the characters take on roles as translators and interpreters and make use of certain tools such as storytelling and food to effect translation. On the extratextual level, Fremd, Gooneratne, Sakkas, Sallis and Teo represent cultural translation in the four thematic areas the immigrant child, storytelling, food and life crisis.

The first theme, the immigrant child, examined in chapter one, explores the effects of using the immigrant child as translator in communication situations between immigrants and representatives of Australian public institutions. In these situations, the child becomes the adult's interpreter of the Australian target culture. The role as translator entails other roles such as a link to and a shield against the Australian society and, as a result, traditional power relations are reversed.

Chapter two analyses how the second theme, storytelling, is presented as an instrument for cultural education and cultural translation in the texts. Storytelling functions to transfer power relations and resistance from one generation to the next. Through storytelling, the immigrant's hybrid identity is maintained because the connection to the source culture is strengthened, both for the storyteller and the listener.

The third theme, food as a symbol of cultural identity and as representation of the source and target cultures, is explored in chapter three. Source and target food cultures are polarised in the novels, and through an acceptance or a rejection of food from the source or target cultures, the characters symbolically accept or reject a belonging to that particular cultural environment. A fusion between the source and target food cultures emphasises the immigrant characters' cultural hybridity and functions as a strategic marketing of culturally specific elements during which a specific source culture is translated to a target consumer.

Finally, the fourth theme, life crisis, is analysed in chapter four where it is a necessary means through which the characters experience a second encounter with Australia and Australians. While their first encounter with Australia traps the characters in a liminal space/phase that is signified by cultural distancing, the second encounter offers a desire and ability for cultural translation, an acceptance of cultural hybridity and the possibility to become translated beings - a state where the characters are able to translate back and forth between the source and target cultures.

The Asian Conspiracy : Deploying Voice/Deploying Story Merlinda Bobis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 1-19)
'This essay develops on the premise of imagining, which is the heart of story-making: imagine the physicality of story. Imagine the deployment strategies, the covert 'translations' of difference' that facilitate the entry of the Other story through the gate.
And once inside, imagine how this Otherness is legitimised, packaged and consumed within the Australian nation.' (p. 3)
Reconfiguring 'Asian Australian' Writing : Australia, India and Inez Baranay Paul Sharrad , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 11-29)
Change, Conflict and Convergence in Pursuit of Identity : Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies Tara Senanayake , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 140-150)
'The focus of this study will be the manner in which identity is negotiated in Yasmine Gooneratne's first novel A Change of Skies. A 'migrant' or 'expatriate' writer writing from the periphery, Gooneratne tries to create her own postcolonial identity through her fiction...' (p.141)
Tracing Hybridity in Sri Lankan Writing : Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies Isabel Alonso-Breto , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 326-339)
Englishness in South-East Asian Fiction : the Cases of Paul Theroux and Yasmine Gooneratne L'anglicite dans la fiction de l'Asie du sud-est : les exemples de Paul Theroux et de Yasmine Gooneratne Rudiger Ahrens , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Revue LISA , vol. 7 no. 3 2009;
Transference and the Writing of 'Home' in the Psychobab(el) of Diaspora Mridula Nath Chakraborty , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interpreting Homes in South Asian Literature 2007;
Beyond the Centre and Margin : Representations of Australia in South Asian Immigrant Writings Vera Alexander , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 154-173)
'Displacement leads to a high sensitivity to space and its potential to affect constructions of identity. Immigrants are continually confronted with the questions of who belongs to a country and who a country belongs to. In this paper I examine representations of Australia in two novels by writers of South Asian origin resident in Australia, Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies (1991) and Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments (1994). In doing so, I argue for a transcultural reading of Australia's position as an ambivalent diasporic location: white, Anglophone, but situated outside the 'western' centre.' (Author's abstract p. 154)
Multiculturalism in Change of Skies and The Time of the Peacock : Protest and Acquiescence in the Novels of Yasmine Gooneratne and Mena Abdullah Pradip Kumar Patra , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Explorations in Australian Literature 2006; (p. 123-130) Women's Writing in English : India and Australia 2008; (p. 67-74)
Patra argues that 'Australian identity means many identities and has attained a new kind of sophistication and broad tolerance which thousands of years of world history have so far seldom managed to achieve'.
Leaving/Living: A Study of Three Immigrant Writers in Relation to Australian Identity Keya Majumdar , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and India : Interconnections : Identity, Representation, Belonging 2006; (p. 168-181)

Keya Majumdar says: 'My point of interest in this article would be to see how between the cracks of the diasporic narratives appear not the text of the Diaspora alone, but the inherent meaning of humanity. My study also hopes to find an emergent horizon of consensus, based on the international appreciation of the new generation of expatriates who outlook, as depicted in both Gooneratne's and Khan's narratives, signifies a committed movement towards multiculturalism.'

A Change of Skies and The Time of the Peacock : A Study of the Multi-Cultural Novels of Yasmine Gooneratne and Mena Abdullah Pradip Kumar Patra , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and India : Interconnections : Identity, Representation, Belonging 2006; (p. 193-201)
S. Asian Odysseys in Australia - W/Here Is 'Home'? South Asian Odysseys in Australia - Where Is 'Home'? Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diaspora : The Australasian Experience 2005; (p. 220-231)
This is a short, comparative account of the works listed which examines the portrayal of Australia and Australians in each text. Driesen chooses not to emphasise issues relating to displacement and loss (what she terms 'the shadow-side of the experience of diaspora'), focusing instead on the positive aspects of migration.
Spacing the Third 'I' in Diaspora Writings Keya Majumdar , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diaspora : The Australasian Experience 2005; (p. 240-248)
Majumdar compares Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies (1991) to The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (2003).
Double-Crossing One Nation : Contemporary Asian-Australian Narratives Russell West-Pavlov , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Who's Australia? - Whose Australia? : Contemporary Politics, Society and Culture in Australia 2005; Imaginary Antipodes : Essays on Contemporary Australian Literature and Culture 2011; (p. 159-170)
This chapter 'addresses more recent immigration experiences, namely the late-twentieth-century wave of immigration - not from Europe, but from East and South-East Asia - that has fundamentally inflected the character of contemporary Australian society. The work of Brian Castro (Birds of Passage, 1983), Yasmin Gooneratne (A Change of Skies, 1991) and Hsu-Ming Teo (Love and Vertigo, 2000) reveals other trajectories in which the figure of crossing supplements that of the absent origin to destabilize excessively closed notions of national identity.' (From author's introduction, 14)
Cross-Cultural Experience and Existence in Yasmine Gooneratne's Novel A Change of Skies Barbara Schmidt-Haberkamp , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Towards a Transcultural Future : Literature and Society in a 'Post'-Colonial World [1] 2004; (p. 215-229)
Untitled R. K. Dhawan , 1991-1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 3 no. 2 1991-1992; (p. 249-250)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
A Satire on Australian Immigration Ian McFarlane , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 3 August 1991; (p. C9)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel ; Tall Grow the Tallow-Woods Geoffrey C. Bingham 1991 single work novel
Advice for Browsers - Judge this One by its Cover Alison Broinowski , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 October 1991; (p. 38)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Barry Mundy Takes on the Southern Cross Liam Davison , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 134 1991; (p. 13-14)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Bookworm 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 14 July 1991;

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Curious, Eliding Parody Cath Kenneally , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , October no. 93 1991; (p. 36)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Delicious Comedy of Manners Maria Trefely-Deutch , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Telegraph , 18 August 1991;

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Don't Miss this Serve of Barry Mundy Rob Johnson , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser Magazine , 14 September 1991; (p. 13)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Happy Families and a Different Kind of Grieving Simon Hughes , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 September 1991; (p. 11)

— Review of Usher Matthew Condon 1991 single work novel ; Modern Interiors Andrea Goldsmith 1991 single work novel ; A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Love and Hope Over the Suburban Back Fence Terry Lane , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 6 October 1991;

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Melodrama in the Pacific Theatre Dennis Davison , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 August 1991; (p. rev 2)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel ; Life Sentence Nigel Gray 1984 selected work short story ; Deathwatch Colin Falconer 1991 single work novel
On the Way from Sri Lanka to Sydney... Nancy E. Schaumburger , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 5 no. 2 1991; (p. 149-150)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
The Migrant Experience of Exile, Change and Discovery Shelagh Goonewardene , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Sri Lankan , November 1991; (p. 8)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
The Shock of the New Michelle De Kretser , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , December vol. 3 no. 4 1991; (p. 10-11)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Yamine Gooneratne's First Novel 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Lanka Woman , 9 October vol. 8 no. 36 1991; (p. 12)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
A Debut Novel - With a Dash of Adventure and Suspense Lakshmi De Silva , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Sri Lanka News , 19 February 1992; (p. 14)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Migrants in Wonderland Haydn Williams , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 1 1992; (p. 34-36)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Refreshingly Readable Roshan Peiris , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times [Perth] , 15 March 1992; (p. 13)

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Untitled Sonya Ghosh , single work review
— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
A Sri Lankan Pearl Subhash K. Jha , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Times of India , 7 February 1993;

— Review of A Change of Skies Yasmine Gooneratne 1991 single work novel
Looking Different/Re-thinking Difference : Global Constraints and/or Contradictory Characteristics in Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies and Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments Yvette Tan , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Racial Ambiguity 2002; (p. 233-251)
The Great Southern Land : Asian-Australian Women Writers Re-View the Australian Landscape Shirley Tucker , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 2 2003; (p. 178-188)
Tucker examines the representation of landscape in Asian-Australian women's writing in terms of the aesthetics of Australian literature.
Nations without States : The Search for Home in H. H.. Richardson's Fortunes of Richard Mahony and Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies John McLaren , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 79-86)
Bushes in Two Hemispheres : Susanna Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush and Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies A. G. Khan , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 87-96)
Author's introduction: 'Two women writers belonging to different hemispheres describe the immigrant experience to arrive at different conclusions. While Susanna Moodie's account was to educate the aspirants to not to risk the journey to Canada, Yasmine Gooneratne tries to drive away such apprehensions by asserting that Australia is a place that would not permit one to return home. This paper seeks to study human predicament in two different hemispheres of people caught up in adverse circumstances.' (87)
Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies and Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine : The Immigrant Experience in Australia and the USA Indira Nityanandam , 1992-1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 4 no. 2 1992-1993; (p. 50-54)
Cross-Cultural Encounters in Amit Chaudhuri's Afternoon Raag and Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Sky Vera Alexander , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Politics of English as a World Language : New Horizons in Postcolonial Cultural Studies 2003; (p. 375-383)
Author's abstract: This essay describes the role of the English language in two South Asian novels in English from the 1990s. Both texts contain self-reflective and highly innovative strategies for reconsidering the hegemonic structures imbedded in the use of English in a postcolonial context. The two novels depict the experiences of South Asian scholars who visit universities in anglophone countries. Close reading of the encounters with diverse Englishes in both novels reveals that both cite colonial stereotypes only to dismantle the authority of the vestigial hegemonic structures represented by the English language. By comparing the two novels, this interpretation stesses common patterns of replacing binary concepts of the use of English with individual, creative hybridazations. (375)
Cross-Cultural Experience and Existence in Yasmine Gooneratne's Novel A Change of Skies Barbara Schmidt-Haberkamp , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Towards a Transcultural Future : Literature and Society in a 'Post'-Colonial World [1] 2004; (p. 215-229)
Multiculturalism in Change of Skies and The Time of the Peacock : Protest and Acquiescence in the Novels of Yasmine Gooneratne and Mena Abdullah Pradip Kumar Patra , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Explorations in Australian Literature 2006; (p. 123-130) Women's Writing in English : India and Australia 2008; (p. 67-74)
Patra argues that 'Australian identity means many identities and has attained a new kind of sophistication and broad tolerance which thousands of years of world history have so far seldom managed to achieve'.
The Phases and Guises of the Twentieth-century Sri Lankan Expatriate Novel Walter Perera , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: CRNLE Journal 2000; (p. 52-60)
S. Asian Odysseys in Australia - W/Here Is 'Home'? South Asian Odysseys in Australia - Where Is 'Home'? Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diaspora : The Australasian Experience 2005; (p. 220-231)
This is a short, comparative account of the works listed which examines the portrayal of Australia and Australians in each text. Driesen chooses not to emphasise issues relating to displacement and loss (what she terms 'the shadow-side of the experience of diaspora'), focusing instead on the positive aspects of migration.
Spacing the Third 'I' in Diaspora Writings Keya Majumdar , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diaspora : The Australasian Experience 2005; (p. 240-248)
Majumdar compares Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies (1991) to The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (2003).
Leaving/Living: A Study of Three Immigrant Writers in Relation to Australian Identity Keya Majumdar , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and India : Interconnections : Identity, Representation, Belonging 2006; (p. 168-181)

Keya Majumdar says: 'My point of interest in this article would be to see how between the cracks of the diasporic narratives appear not the text of the Diaspora alone, but the inherent meaning of humanity. My study also hopes to find an emergent horizon of consensus, based on the international appreciation of the new generation of expatriates who outlook, as depicted in both Gooneratne's and Khan's narratives, signifies a committed movement towards multiculturalism.'

A Change of Skies and The Time of the Peacock : A Study of the Multi-Cultural Novels of Yasmine Gooneratne and Mena Abdullah Pradip Kumar Patra , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and India : Interconnections : Identity, Representation, Belonging 2006; (p. 193-201)
Transference and the Writing of 'Home' in the Psychobab(el) of Diaspora Mridula Nath Chakraborty , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interpreting Homes in South Asian Literature 2007;
Migrant Literature as Symbolic Capital in the Politics of Culture Leah Saunders , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Verandah , vol. 12 no. 1997; (p. 66-71)
Englishness in South-East Asian Fiction : the Cases of Paul Theroux and Yasmine Gooneratne L'anglicite dans la fiction de l'Asie du sud-est : les exemples de Paul Theroux et de Yasmine Gooneratne Rudiger Ahrens , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Revue LISA , vol. 7 no. 3 2009;
y A Translation of Worlds: Aspects of Cultural Translation and Australian Migration Literature. Anette Svensson , Umea : Umea University, Dept of Language Studies , 2010 Z1676807 2010 single work criticism

This study explores the exchange of cultural information that takes place in the meeting between immigrant and non-immigrant characters in a selection of Australian novels focusing on the theme of migration: Heartland (1989) by Angelika Fremd, A Change of Skies (1991) by Yasmine Gooneratne, Stella's Place (1998) by Jim Sakkas, Hiam (1998) by Eva Sallis and Love and Vertigo (2000) by Hsu-Ming Teo.

The concept cultural translation functions as a theoretical tool in the analyses. The translation model is particularly useful for this purpose since it parallels the migration process and emphasises the power relations involved in cultural encounters. Within the framework of the study, cultural translation is defined as making an unfamiliar cultural phenomenon familiar to someone. On the intratextual level of the text, the characters take on roles as translators and interpreters and make use of certain tools such as storytelling and food to effect translation. On the extratextual level, Fremd, Gooneratne, Sakkas, Sallis and Teo represent cultural translation in the four thematic areas the immigrant child, storytelling, food and life crisis.

The first theme, the immigrant child, examined in chapter one, explores the effects of using the immigrant child as translator in communication situations between immigrants and representatives of Australian public institutions. In these situations, the child becomes the adult's interpreter of the Australian target culture. The role as translator entails other roles such as a link to and a shield against the Australian society and, as a result, traditional power relations are reversed.

Chapter two analyses how the second theme, storytelling, is presented as an instrument for cultural education and cultural translation in the texts. Storytelling functions to transfer power relations and resistance from one generation to the next. Through storytelling, the immigrant's hybrid identity is maintained because the connection to the source culture is strengthened, both for the storyteller and the listener.

The third theme, food as a symbol of cultural identity and as representation of the source and target cultures, is explored in chapter three. Source and target food cultures are polarised in the novels, and through an acceptance or a rejection of food from the source or target cultures, the characters symbolically accept or reject a belonging to that particular cultural environment. A fusion between the source and target food cultures emphasises the immigrant characters' cultural hybridity and functions as a strategic marketing of culturally specific elements during which a specific source culture is translated to a target consumer.

Finally, the fourth theme, life crisis, is analysed in chapter four where it is a necessary means through which the characters experience a second encounter with Australia and Australians. While their first encounter with Australia traps the characters in a liminal space/phase that is signified by cultural distancing, the second encounter offers a desire and ability for cultural translation, an acceptance of cultural hybridity and the possibility to become translated beings - a state where the characters are able to translate back and forth between the source and target cultures.

The Asian Conspiracy : Deploying Voice/Deploying Story Merlinda Bobis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 1-19)
'This essay develops on the premise of imagining, which is the heart of story-making: imagine the physicality of story. Imagine the deployment strategies, the covert 'translations' of difference' that facilitate the entry of the Other story through the gate.
And once inside, imagine how this Otherness is legitimised, packaged and consumed within the Australian nation.' (p. 3)
Reconfiguring 'Asian Australian' Writing : Australia, India and Inez Baranay Paul Sharrad , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 11-29)
Beyond the Centre and Margin : Representations of Australia in South Asian Immigrant Writings Vera Alexander , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 154-173)
'Displacement leads to a high sensitivity to space and its potential to affect constructions of identity. Immigrants are continually confronted with the questions of who belongs to a country and who a country belongs to. In this paper I examine representations of Australia in two novels by writers of South Asian origin resident in Australia, Yasmine Gooneratne's A Change of Skies (1991) and Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments (1994). In doing so, I argue for a transcultural reading of Australia's position as an ambivalent diasporic location: white, Anglophone, but situated outside the 'western' centre.' (Author's abstract p. 154)

Awards

1992 winner Society of Women Writers, New South Wales, Awards Marjorie Barnard Literary Award
Last amended 11 May 2004 09:58:03
Subjects:
  • c
    Sri Lanka,
    c
    South Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
Settings:
  • c
    Australia,
    c
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