form y Black Man's Houses single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992 1992
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This film is a re-examination of Tasmanian history. In particular it explored the reasons for the deep divide, at the time, between the contemporary Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities on Flinders Island in Bass Strait. A symbol of this divide was the dispute over land at Wybalenna, where the remaining tribal Aborigines from the Tasmanian mainland were incarcerated in the mid-19th Century and which is the site of over 120 Aboriginal graves. At the time of filming the Aboriginal community had lost a Land Rights claim to the site and were occupying it 'illegally' in protest.' (Source: http://www.documentaryaustralia.com.au/case_studies/details/32/blackmans-houses)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Freedom Stories : What I’ve Learned from Filming Australia’s Asylum Seekers Steve Thomas , 2015 single work autobiography
— Appears in: The Conversation , 14 July 2015;
Remembering a Saltwater Man Called Bennelong Steve Dow , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 26-27 January 2013; (p. 6)
‘Islands of Possibility’ : Film-Making, Cultural Practice, Political Action and the Decolonization of Tasmanian History Jenny Thornley , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , October vol. 7 no. 2-3 2013; (p. 123-136)
This article considers the potential of a decolonizing poetics, evident across Tasmanian Aboriginal arts and cultural works, to contribute to a distinctively Aboriginal film-making practice in Tasmania. The potency of this body of work, alongside the Aboriginal community’s vigorous political campaigns for cultural rights and land rights, has not translated into a distinctively Tasmanian Aboriginal film culture. Apart from several significant documentary films and photographic works that indicate the emergence of a powerful decolonizing poetics there are no fictional feature films by Tasmanian Aboriginal film-makers. Moreover recent feature films produced by non-Indigenous film-makers about Tasmania invoke the ‘Tasmanian Gothic’ trope, imagining an island without any Aboriginal presence. This article considers processes that contribute to decolonizing through the contemporary work of Tasmanian Aboriginal writers and artists, including Jim Everett, Julie Gough, Greg Lehman and photographer Ricky Maynard. I suggest their poetics are more than textual. They are grounded in country and community – linked to another realm beyond the ‘shallow’ time of colonization. Their decolonizing poetics are shared with Maori film-maker Barry Barclay’s ‘Fourth Cinema’, where the camera is firmly in Indigenous hands, based in community and cultural practices.' (Author's abstract)
Remembering a Saltwater Man Called Bennelong Steve Dow , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 26-27 January 2013; (p. 6)
‘Islands of Possibility’ : Film-Making, Cultural Practice, Political Action and the Decolonization of Tasmanian History Jenny Thornley , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , October vol. 7 no. 2-3 2013; (p. 123-136)
This article considers the potential of a decolonizing poetics, evident across Tasmanian Aboriginal arts and cultural works, to contribute to a distinctively Aboriginal film-making practice in Tasmania. The potency of this body of work, alongside the Aboriginal community’s vigorous political campaigns for cultural rights and land rights, has not translated into a distinctively Tasmanian Aboriginal film culture. Apart from several significant documentary films and photographic works that indicate the emergence of a powerful decolonizing poetics there are no fictional feature films by Tasmanian Aboriginal film-makers. Moreover recent feature films produced by non-Indigenous film-makers about Tasmania invoke the ‘Tasmanian Gothic’ trope, imagining an island without any Aboriginal presence. This article considers processes that contribute to decolonizing through the contemporary work of Tasmanian Aboriginal writers and artists, including Jim Everett, Julie Gough, Greg Lehman and photographer Ricky Maynard. I suggest their poetics are more than textual. They are grounded in country and community – linked to another realm beyond the ‘shallow’ time of colonization. Their decolonizing poetics are shared with Maori film-maker Barry Barclay’s ‘Fourth Cinema’, where the camera is firmly in Indigenous hands, based in community and cultural practices.' (Author's abstract)
Freedom Stories : What I’ve Learned from Filming Australia’s Asylum Seekers Steve Thomas , 2015 single work autobiography
— Appears in: The Conversation , 14 July 2015;
Last amended 30 Sep 2015 13:43:15
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  • Tasmania,
  • Flinders Island, Bass Strait Islands, Tasmania,
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