7770526444481578591.jpg
Image Courtesy of Publisher's Website.
y Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent single work   children's fiction   children's   historical fiction  
Is part of Animal Stars Jackie French 2006 series - author children's fiction (number 6 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2012 2012
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'All of Australia′s dingoes may be descended from one south-east Asian ′rubbish dog′ who arrived here over 5,000 years ago. This is a story about the first dingo.

'It is also the story of Loa, who heads off across the sea in his canoe when the girl he loves marries another. He takes only his spears and a "rubbish dog", one of the scavengers from around the camp to eat if he gets hungry, or to throw to threatening sharks or crocodiles. But when a storm blows boy and dog out to sea, both must learn to survive in a strange new world as partners - and even as friends.' (From the publisher's website.)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2012 .
      7770526444481578591.jpg
      Image Courtesy of Publisher's Website.
      Extent: 165p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 1 July 2012.
      ISBN: 9780730493778 (ebk.), 9780732293116 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

History, The Holocaust and Children’s Historical Fiction Hsu-Ming Teo , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'In 2013, the NSW Premier’s Young People’s History Prize was won by Australian novelist Jackie French’s historical novel Pennies for Hitler. French’s young adult novel, Dingo: The dog who conquered a continent, was also one of the three works shortlisted for the prize. No history/literary wars broke out over these historical novels. This article considers why children’s historical fiction is considered ‘good’ (or ‘good enough’) history when so many adult historical novels are not. Beginning with a brief overview of the competing claims about the ‘fictiveness’ of history, this article then uses French’s Pennies for Hitler as well as her novel Hitler’s daughter (1999) as case studies to test what Australian children – French’s main readership – would actually learn about Nazi Germany, the Holocaust and the Second World War from historical fiction. It concludes with a reflection about why the pleasures of childhood reading are denied adults, who are perhaps encouraged to treat history like work instead.' (Publication summary)
[Untitled] H. M. Saxby , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 57 no. 2 2013; (p. 31)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
Untitled Rebecca Butterworth , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April/May vol. 91 no. 8 2012; (p. 18)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
Untitled Chloe Mauger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 27 no. 4 2012; (p. 36)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
Untitled Rebecca Butterworth , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April/May vol. 91 no. 8 2012; (p. 18)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
Untitled Chloe Mauger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 27 no. 4 2012; (p. 36)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
[Untitled] H. M. Saxby , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 57 no. 2 2013; (p. 31)

— Review of Dingo : The Dog Who Conquered a Continent Jackie French 2012 single work children's fiction
History, The Holocaust and Children’s Historical Fiction Hsu-Ming Teo , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'In 2013, the NSW Premier’s Young People’s History Prize was won by Australian novelist Jackie French’s historical novel Pennies for Hitler. French’s young adult novel, Dingo: The dog who conquered a continent, was also one of the three works shortlisted for the prize. No history/literary wars broke out over these historical novels. This article considers why children’s historical fiction is considered ‘good’ (or ‘good enough’) history when so many adult historical novels are not. Beginning with a brief overview of the competing claims about the ‘fictiveness’ of history, this article then uses French’s Pennies for Hitler as well as her novel Hitler’s daughter (1999) as case studies to test what Australian children – French’s main readership – would actually learn about Nazi Germany, the Holocaust and the Second World War from historical fiction. It concludes with a reflection about why the pleasures of childhood reading are denied adults, who are perhaps encouraged to treat history like work instead.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 21 Jan 2014 11:53:09
Settings:
  • At sea,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X