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This image has been sourced from online.
y Rising Water single work   drama   - Two acts
Issue Details: First known date: 2012 2012
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Living aboard neighbouring boats in a crowded marina, Col, Baxter and Jackie are middle-aged fringe-dwellers. Each of them nurses secret wounds and anxieties, and although their vessels are ocean-going craft, none seems likely to ever leave the safe confines of the harbour. They are hiding from the world behind and beyond.

On Australia Day, drunk, lost and angry, a young English backpacker called Dee turns up on the jetty and her arrival unleashes chaos. Suddenly no secret is safe, nothing is fixed. As the nation celebrates, the cosy fantasy of safety from the past is blown open in a funny, bitter torrent of loose talk.' (Publisher's blurb)

Production Details

  • First produced by the Black Swan State Theatre Company, Perth, Western Australia, 25 June-17 July 2011, directed by Kate Cherry. Produced at Albany, Western Australia, 22-23 July 2011 and in Melbourne 9 August - 10 September 2011.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Strawberry Hills, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Currency Press , 2012 .
      Extent: ix, 63pp.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Kate Cherry, April 2012.
      ISBN: 9780868199412 (pbk.) :
      Series: Currency Plays Currency Press (publisher), series - publisher
    • Balmain, Glebe - Leichhardt - Balmain area, Sydney Inner West, Sydney, New South Wales,: Ligature , 2015 .
      5056691716761469010.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 76p.p.

Works about this Work

Australian Literature, Risk, and the Global Climate Challenge Graham Huggan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature, Interpretation, Theory , vol. 26 no. 2 2015; (p. 85-105)
'Envision two scenarios, the one real the other imagined, both played out in Australia's southeast regions. In the imagined one, taken from George Turner's post-apocalyptic story “The Fittest,” the year is 2035 and parts of Melbourne are under water. The embattled city is divided into two camps, the Swill and the Sweet, who make up nine tenths and one tenth of the population, respectively. The Swill live in run-down tenement blocks in the low-lying southern and western areas of the city, which are at the mercy of rising sea levels caused by the catastrophic melting of the ice caps. The Sweet look down on the Swill, both literally and metaphorically, from their privileged vantage on the higher levels. The Swill, meanwhile, are left to fend for themselves in a daily and brutal struggle for survival: jobless, hungry, they are little more than predatory animals, a racially stigmatized underclass equivalent to Asia's barbarian hordes (Maxwell 20–21; Morgan). In the real one, the year is 2013 and parts of Tasmania have been transformed into an inferno. A devastating heatwave covering most of the southern and eastern parts of Australia has caused wildfires to spread, with its largest offshore island bearing the brunt of it. There are few deaths, but hundreds of people are displaced and irreparable damage is done to thousands of hectares of land and property. Media commentators return to that most obdurate if readily reversible of clichés, Australia as un/lucky country, linking the sins of commission (the perils of boom-and-bust economics) to those of omission (the price paid for ecological neglect).1 Spoiling as always for a fight, the British environmental campaigner George Monbiot sanctimoniously reminds his antipodean cousins that they burn twice as much carbon as his own countrymen, and that the history of Australia, framed as a “land of opportunity in which progress is limited only by the rate at which natural resources can be extracted,” doubles as a cautionary tale of what happens when “climate change clashes with a story of great cultural power.” Lest the moral of the story be unclear, Monbiot flourishingly underscores it: “Australia's new weather,” he says, “demands a new politics, a politics capable of responding to an existential threat.”' (Author's introduction)
Words Put Winton in Rising Water Matthew Westwood , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 June 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
y Sink or Swim Mark Naglazas , Z1788513 2011 single work column
Drama Gets Its Bearings Victoria Laurie , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 1 July 2011; (p. 18)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
Nuanced Portrait of a Bittersweet Relationship Victoria Laurie , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 5 July 2011; (p. 15)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
In the Depths of Winton Kylie Northover , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30-31 July 2011; (p. 10-11) The Saturday Age , 30 July 2011; (p. 18)
Struggling to Stay Afloat Cameron Woodhead , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 11 August 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
Tim Winton Writes for the Stage Christy Hopwood , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Voice , 15 August - 11 September vol. 7 no. 8 2011;
Words Put Winton in Rising Water Matthew Westwood , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 June 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
Drama Gets Its Bearings Victoria Laurie , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 1 July 2011; (p. 18)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
Nuanced Portrait of a Bittersweet Relationship Victoria Laurie , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 5 July 2011; (p. 15)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
Struggling to Stay Afloat Cameron Woodhead , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 11 August 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of Rising Water Tim Winton 2012 single work drama
y Sink or Swim Mark Naglazas , Z1788513 2011 single work column
In the Depths of Winton Kylie Northover , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30-31 July 2011; (p. 10-11) The Saturday Age , 30 July 2011; (p. 18)
Tim Winton Writes for the Stage Christy Hopwood , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Voice , 15 August - 11 September vol. 7 no. 8 2011;
Australian Literature, Risk, and the Global Climate Challenge Graham Huggan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature, Interpretation, Theory , vol. 26 no. 2 2015; (p. 85-105)
'Envision two scenarios, the one real the other imagined, both played out in Australia's southeast regions. In the imagined one, taken from George Turner's post-apocalyptic story “The Fittest,” the year is 2035 and parts of Melbourne are under water. The embattled city is divided into two camps, the Swill and the Sweet, who make up nine tenths and one tenth of the population, respectively. The Swill live in run-down tenement blocks in the low-lying southern and western areas of the city, which are at the mercy of rising sea levels caused by the catastrophic melting of the ice caps. The Sweet look down on the Swill, both literally and metaphorically, from their privileged vantage on the higher levels. The Swill, meanwhile, are left to fend for themselves in a daily and brutal struggle for survival: jobless, hungry, they are little more than predatory animals, a racially stigmatized underclass equivalent to Asia's barbarian hordes (Maxwell 20–21; Morgan). In the real one, the year is 2013 and parts of Tasmania have been transformed into an inferno. A devastating heatwave covering most of the southern and eastern parts of Australia has caused wildfires to spread, with its largest offshore island bearing the brunt of it. There are few deaths, but hundreds of people are displaced and irreparable damage is done to thousands of hectares of land and property. Media commentators return to that most obdurate if readily reversible of clichés, Australia as un/lucky country, linking the sins of commission (the perils of boom-and-bust economics) to those of omission (the price paid for ecological neglect).1 Spoiling as always for a fight, the British environmental campaigner George Monbiot sanctimoniously reminds his antipodean cousins that they burn twice as much carbon as his own countrymen, and that the history of Australia, framed as a “land of opportunity in which progress is limited only by the rate at which natural resources can be extracted,” doubles as a cautionary tale of what happens when “climate change clashes with a story of great cultural power.” Lest the moral of the story be unclear, Monbiot flourishingly underscores it: “Australia's new weather,” he says, “demands a new politics, a politics capable of responding to an existential threat.”' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 18 Aug 2016 15:32:26
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