8164206117376148210.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Days Like This single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2010 2010
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'She has to escape.

But who else is out there?

And can anyone survive days like this?

'I want to go back to the days when life made sense. The days before our parents became strange; before the warming ate away at all the living things in the world; before The Committee and their Blacktroopers. Before the Wall.

'Lily is a prisoner in her own home. Forced to stay inside by The Committee and guarded by their increasingly distant parents, Lily and her brother Daniel are beginning to ask why. Then, when Daniel disappears just before his seventeenth birthday, Lily knows she is next.' (From the publisher's website.)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2010
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2011 .
      8164206117376148210.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 300p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 1 August 2011.
      ISBN: 9780143206545 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
End of the World Not So Far Off Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 31 December - 1 January 2012; (p. 20-21)
Off the Shelf : Young Adult Fiction Dianne Dempsey , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 13 August 2011; (p. 34)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Fran Knight , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 26 no. 4 2011; (p. 44)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Inspiration and Imagination Imogen Saunders , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 October 2011; (p. 32)

— Review of The Invisible Hero Elizabeth Fensham 2011 single work children's fiction ; Cargo Jessica Au 2011 single work novel ; Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 19 no. 4 2011; (p. 15)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Chloe Mauger , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 55 no. 4 2011; (p. 39)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Former Herald Journalist in Running for Amazon Novel Award Erik Jensen , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5-6 June 2010; (p. 11)
Off the Shelf : Young Adult Fiction Dianne Dempsey , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 13 August 2011; (p. 34)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Fran Knight , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 26 no. 4 2011; (p. 44)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Inspiration and Imagination Imogen Saunders , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 October 2011; (p. 32)

— Review of The Invisible Hero Elizabeth Fensham 2011 single work children's fiction ; Cargo Jessica Au 2011 single work novel ; Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 19 no. 4 2011; (p. 15)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Untitled Chloe Mauger , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 55 no. 4 2011; (p. 39)

— Review of Days Like This Alison Stewart 2010 single work novel
Former Herald Journalist in Running for Amazon Novel Award Erik Jensen , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5-6 June 2010; (p. 11)
End of the World Not So Far Off Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 31 December - 1 January 2012; (p. 20-21)
How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
Last amended 26 Sep 2016 10:37:03
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