form y Gulpilil : One Red Blood single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'David Gulpilil is one of the most respected Australian actors of his generation. Born in 1953 he grew up on an Aboriginal reserve and worked as a stockman. Possessing exceptional talents as a dancer, at age 14 he was chosen to play the lead in Nicholas Roeg's film Walkabout (1970). He went on to act in a number of Australian feature films including Mad Dog Morgan (1976), Storm Boy (1977), The Last Wave (1977), Crocodile Dundee (1986) and Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002). Most recently he won the AFI award for best actor for his performance in The Tracker (2002). When he is not acting, Gulpilil lives a demanding traditional tribal life with his family in Arnhem Land, Northern Australia where he is an elder of the Yolgnu clan. Following Gulpilil from the set of The Tracker back to his community the film reveals how the actor negotiates the two very different worlds he moves between. Interviews with Phillip Noyce, Rolf De Heer, Marcia Langton, Gary Foley, Jack Thompson, Gulpilil and others are interspersed with clips from films in which the actor has appeared.' Source: Libraries Australia (Sighted 28/02/2008).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      2002 .
      Extent: 56 min.p.
      Description: videocassette: sound, color; 1/2 in.

Works about this Work

Between Worlds : Indigenous Identity and Difference in the Films of Darlene Johnson Therese Davis , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Camera Obscura : A Journal of Feminism and Film Theory , vol. 29 no. 85 2014; (p. 81-110)

'The article looks at the contributions of writer and director Darlene Johnson to an emerging Australian Indigenous cinema. It discusses the ways in which Johnson draws on her experience as a young, urban Indigenous woman and her knowledge of Aboriginal culture to explore the postcolonial subjectivity of being caught between two worlds in her documentary and short fiction films, including River of No Return (2008), Gulpilil: One Red Blood (2002), Crocodile Dreaming (2006), and Two Bob Mermaid (1996). It argues that these films offer unique insights into the history of Indigenous involvement in cinema as a global system, and into the complexity of contemporary Indigenous filmmaking in Australia as a specialist sector that operates within while remaining different from the state-funded national film industry.' (Publication summary)

Between Worlds : Indigenous Identity and Difference in the Films of Darlene Johnson Therese Davis , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Camera Obscura : A Journal of Feminism and Film Theory , vol. 29 no. 85 2014; (p. 81-110)

'The article looks at the contributions of writer and director Darlene Johnson to an emerging Australian Indigenous cinema. It discusses the ways in which Johnson draws on her experience as a young, urban Indigenous woman and her knowledge of Aboriginal culture to explore the postcolonial subjectivity of being caught between two worlds in her documentary and short fiction films, including River of No Return (2008), Gulpilil: One Red Blood (2002), Crocodile Dreaming (2006), and Two Bob Mermaid (1996). It argues that these films offer unique insights into the history of Indigenous involvement in cinema as a global system, and into the complexity of contemporary Indigenous filmmaking in Australia as a specialist sector that operates within while remaining different from the state-funded national film industry.' (Publication summary)

Last amended 17 Feb 2014 16:05:52
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