When Everyone's an Author single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008 2008
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Weekend Australian 9-10 February 2008 Z1467697 2008 newspaper issue 2008 pg. 4-5 Section: Review

Works about this Work

Creative Writing, Cultural Capital and the Labour Market Scott Brook , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 53 2012;
'Over the last decade several Australian broadsheet newspapers have run numerous articles on the state of literary publishing, providing a rare opportunity for academic debate to enter the public arena. According to the reported commentary of novelists, publishers and academics, it would seem the literary field is caught between two contradictory currents: although the economic viability of Australian literary titles appears under pressure, there is booming demand for university courses in creative writing. This casual linkage has enabled a range of speculations on the possibly 'perverse' market relations between writing programs and the publishing industry. Has consumer demand for Australian literary authors shifted from the bookshop to the arts faculty? A recent quip by Frank Moorhouse would suggest so: 'Now the joke goes that when someone says they're a writer, the next question is, "where do you teach?"' (10).' (Author's introduction)
Untitled Bill Metcalf , 2008 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 March 2008; (p. 2)
Untitled Bill Metcalf , 2008 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 March 2008; (p. 2)
Creative Writing, Cultural Capital and the Labour Market Scott Brook , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 53 2012;
'Over the last decade several Australian broadsheet newspapers have run numerous articles on the state of literary publishing, providing a rare opportunity for academic debate to enter the public arena. According to the reported commentary of novelists, publishers and academics, it would seem the literary field is caught between two contradictory currents: although the economic viability of Australian literary titles appears under pressure, there is booming demand for university courses in creative writing. This casual linkage has enabled a range of speculations on the possibly 'perverse' market relations between writing programs and the publishing industry. Has consumer demand for Australian literary authors shifted from the bookshop to the arts faculty? A recent quip by Frank Moorhouse would suggest so: 'Now the joke goes that when someone says they're a writer, the next question is, "where do you teach?"' (10).' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 11 Feb 2008 11:45:57
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