Issue Details: First known date: 2007 2007
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This essay argues that contemporary Australian literary theory, like most varieties of contemporary critical theory, is losing whatever relevance it once had, not because 'theory' has lost intellectual force, but because the contexts in which it operated have radically changed. A 'crisis in liberalism' and the rise of neo-liberalism and the new conservatism, I argue, requires a reassessment of the project of critical theory. This is especially crucial in the case of Australian literary criticism, given that Australian literary liberalism is historically complicit with a wider white patrician liberalism that has recently begun to contest itself in response to the new conservative politics of race.' (author's abstract)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y JASAL Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature vol. 7 2007 Z1454555 2007 periodical issue 2007 pg. 7-31
    Note: Includes list of works cited.

Works about this Work

The Asian Conspiracy : Deploying Voice/Deploying Story Merlinda Bobis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 1-19)
'This essay develops on the premise of imagining, which is the heart of story-making: imagine the physicality of story. Imagine the deployment strategies, the covert 'translations' of difference' that facilitate the entry of the Other story through the gate.
And once inside, imagine how this Otherness is legitimised, packaged and consumed within the Australian nation.' (p. 3)
The Asian Conspiracy : Deploying Voice/Deploying Story Merlinda Bobis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 1-19)
'This essay develops on the premise of imagining, which is the heart of story-making: imagine the physicality of story. Imagine the deployment strategies, the covert 'translations' of difference' that facilitate the entry of the Other story through the gate.
And once inside, imagine how this Otherness is legitimised, packaged and consumed within the Australian nation.' (p. 3)
Last amended 9 Aug 2010 11:15:12
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