y Victorian Readers : Third Book anthology   poetry   prose   children's fiction   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 1930 1930
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Notes

  • Content indexing in process.
  • Epigraph: Bright is the ring of words When the right man rings them (Stevenson).
  • Epigraph: 'The Salt of the Earth' by Algernon Charles Swinburne (facing Contents page).
  • Illustrated by Victorian artists Elsie Jean McKissock (Mrs. Timmings) and W. S. Wemyss (qq.v.).
  • Engraving of the memorial to Hans Christian Andersen in Copenhagen, by Danish sculptor Kondrup, on opening page.
  • Photographic image of the statue of Flinders which stands in the grounds of St. Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne (facing Acknowledgements page)

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Victoria Education Department , 1930 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Riding Songi"Flippity-flop! Flippity-flop!", C. J. Dennis , 1930 single work poetry (p. p.6)
Spring-Songi"Sing out and be happy!", Roderic Quinn , 1897 single work poetry (p. 1)
Walking to Schooli"Now I am five, my father says", Ethel Turner , 1911 single work poetry children's (p. 9-12)
Note: Illustrated by W.S. Wemyss
Mates, 1930 single work children's fiction children's
A boy is given the chance of employment at a newspaper office for the night shift but he must find a pair of boots to wear. Overhearing his plight another young boy, working the day shift, offers his boots if he can have them ready each morning to exchange back until he earns enough to purchase his own.
(p. 12-15)
The Letter that Flew Away, Natalie Joan Engleheart , 1930 single work children's fiction children's
Ann's friends are too ill to come to her birthday party but the March wind takes her invitation across the fields to the delight of a group of goblins who attend instead.
(p. 41-47)
Note: Illustrated by W. S. Wemyss (q.v.)
The Crow and the Crane: An Aboriginal Legend, K. Langloh Parker , 1897 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 51-52)
How Dumb Animals Talk, 1930 single work prose children's
Describes how animals can make themselves understood almost as well as if they had the gift of speech.
(p. 81-82)
The Fairy Mani"It was, it was a fairy man", Mary Gilmore , 1910 single work poetry (p. 95-96)
The Spider Orchid, J. J. Hall , 1921-1930 single work children's fiction children's
When a ground spider helps the Queen of the Fairies care for an injured moth, she grants him his wish to be beautiful by turning him into an orchid with her song.
(p. 111-113)
What the Sea-shell Saidi"A boy and a girl once found a shell", Donald MacDonald , 1930 single work poetry children's (p. 114)
Dot and the Kangaroo, Stella Chapman , Douglas Ancelon , 1930 single work extract drama children's (p. 116-120)
Cradle Songi"Baby, O baby, fain you are for bed,", Louis Esson , 1918 single work poetry (p. 134)
* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Victoria Education Department , 1940 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Riding Songi"Flippity-flop! Flippity-flop!", C. J. Dennis , 1930 single work poetry (p. 2)
Walking to Schooli"Now I am five, my father says", Ethel Turner , 1911 single work poetry children's (p. 23-25)
Note: Illustrated by W.S. Wemyss
Lazy Tok, Mervyn Skipper , 1929 single work children's fiction children's Lazy Tok : A Story from Borneo (p. 26-31)
Note: With title: Lazy Tok : A Story from Borneo.
Cradle Songi"Oh! baby, baby, it's time to go to bed,", Louis Esson , 1907 single work poetry (p. 42)
The Letter that Flew Away, Natalie Joan Engleheart , 1930 single work children's fiction children's
Ann's friends are too ill to come to her birthday party but the March wind takes her invitation across the fields to the delight of a group of goblins who attend instead.
(p. 70-76)
The Crow and the Crane: An Aboriginal Legend, K. Langloh Parker , 1897 single work prose Indigenous story (p. 89-90)
Dot and the Kangaroo, Stella Chapman , Douglas Ancelon , 1930 single work extract drama children's (p. 122-126)
Spring-Songi"Sing out and be happy!", Roderic Quinn , 1897 single work poetry (p. 138)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Victoria Education Department , 1930 .
      Printed by H. J. Green
      Extent: vi, 152p.p.
      Edition info: First Edition
      Description: illus. (b & w)
      Note/s:
      • Only literary material by Australian authors individually indexed in contents list below.

        Other material in this reader includes:

      • Fiction: 'The Cobbler and the Elves' by The Brothers Grimm, illustrated by W. S. Wemyss, 2-5; 'Polly's Garden' (from Tiny Tots) 7-9; 'What the Moon Told' by Hans Christian Andersen, 17-18; 'The Discontented Cat' (unattributed) 19-22; 'Brier Rose' (unattributed) 31-34; 'The Town Band' by The Brothers Grimm, 36-39; 'The Rabbit and the Coconut' (unattributed) 54-58; 'The Pussy Willows' (from Fanciful Flower Tales by Madge. A. Bigham) 59-62; 'What Bright-Eyes Wanted' (from R. De Witt in The Prize) 67-71; 'Miss Brown Bulb and the Sparrow' (from Tiny Tots) 75-79; 'The Golden Bird in the King's Garden' (from The Children's Encyclopaedia) illustrated by W. S. Wemyss, 87-95; 'The Golden Egg' by English writer M. E. Hays, 98-102; 'Rags and Tatters' (from The School Journal New Zealand) illustrated by W. S. Wemyss, 104-109; 'The Faithful Worker' (unattributed) 123-124; 'The Little Mother' (translation from the French in the Strand Magazine) 126-133;

      • Poetry: 'The Naughty Boy' by English poet John Keats (1795-1821) 6; 'A Boy's Song' by Scottish poet James Hogg (1770-1835) 16; 'The Wonderful World' by English poet William Brighty Rands (1823-1882) 18; 'The Land of Storybooks' by Scottish poet Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 22-23; 'The Owl and the Pussy-Cat' by English poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) 29-30; 'The Clouds' (unattributed) 34-35; 'The Jolly Welshmen' (unattributed) 40-41; 'The Fairies' by Irish author William Allingham (1824-1889) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 48-51; 'The Rainbow Fairies' by American Lizzie M. Hadley, 53; 'The Butterfly' (unattributed) 58-59; 'Who Stole the Bird's Nest' by American Maria L. Child (1802-1880) illustrated by W.S. Wemyss, 63-66; 'Jack Frost' by American poet Hannah Flagg Gould (1789-1865) 71-72; 'The Blind Men and the Elephant : A Hindu Fable' by American poet John Godfrey Saxe (1816-1887) 73-74; 'Boats Sail on the River' by English poet Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830-1894), illustrated, 80; 'The Fairies of Caldow Low' by English poet Mary Howett (1799-1888) 85-86; 'The Fairy Folk' by American poet Robert Bird (1803-1895) 96-98; 'The Swing' by Robert Louis Stevenson, illustrated, 103; 'Little Boy Blue' by American writer Eugene Field (1850-1895) 109-110; 'Minnie and Winnie' by English poet Alfred Tennyson (1818-1892) 115; 'Santa Claus' (unattributed) illustrated by W.S. Wemyss, 120-122; 'Evening Song' by English poet Cecil Frances Alexander (1818-1885), illustrated, 125;

      • Drama: 'The Three Wishes' from a story by the Brothers Grimm, illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 25-29;

      • Other material: Spelling and Language List, 135-140; Notes and Exercises, critical and biographical, 141-152.

      Series: y Victorian Readers The Victorian Reading-Books Victorian Department of Education (publisher), Charles R. Long (editor), Melbourne : Victorian Department of Education , 1928-1930 Z1417172 1928-1930 series - publisher anthology

      Preface to Victorian Readers: Eighth Book (1929):

      As the need for a Primer and First Book of modern type and for the provision of more space in The School Paper for articles of current interest had been felt for some time, it was decided last year [1927] to proceed with the preparation of a series of reading books (eight in number) to be published by the Government Printer. The selection of matter and the obtaining of drawings from local artists to illustrate it were entrusted to committees of inspectors and teachers, with Mr. J. C. Lowry, B.A. (a senior inspector of schools), as chairman, and Mr. C. R. Long, M.A., as editor.

      This book - the most advanced of the projected series - is the first to be issued. The main aim of the committee that made the selections for it was to obtain such as possessed literary merit, were informative, were likely to arouse interest, and were suitable as regards the average standard of attainment of the grade or forms for which the book was intended. The young readers were to begin at home, to be taken in imagination to various parts of the Empire, to Europe, and to the United States of America, and thus to gain knowledge of their rich heritage and acquire a well-founded pride of race. The inculcation of sound morality was always to be kept in view, and support given to the creation of a feeling against international strife and to the implanting of a desire for world-wide toleration. The grouping of the selections (story, essay, poem etc.) in order to secure continuity of thought - one selection serving to reveal and support another - was to be aimed at throughout, so that the contents of the book might not be a mere collection of unrelated items, but approach as nearly as possible to a unity.

      The committee was of the opinion that notes and explanations to aid in the securing of intelligent reading would be advantageous, but that they should not be unduly elaborate or very numerous, and that they should form a section at the end of the book. It is hoped that those which have been provided will not only prove helpful in themselves, but will also suggest interesting lines of study (critical, etymological, biographical, historical, geographical, etc) that may be followed up to advantage by some of the young readers, if not by all.

      Though it was recognized that the local production of a series of reading-books to compare favourably with those issued by leading British publishers would not be easy of accomplishment, yet it was believed that the effect of the use of such a series in the schools and in the pupils' homes would make the effort well worth while.

      Number in series: 3
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Victoria Education Department , 1940 .
      Printed by H. E. Daw
      Extent: vi, 152p.p.
      Edition info: 2nd edition
      Description: illus. (b & w)
      Note/s:
      • Contents differ slightly from the first edition.
      • Fiction: 'The Rabbit and the Coconut' (unattributed) 2-6; 'The Town Band' by The Brothers Grimm, 9-12; 'The Hare with Many Friends' by Aesop, 14; 'The Ant and the Grasshopper' by Aesop, 16-17; 'The Discontented Cat' (unattributed) 18-21; 'Why Bears have Stumpy Tails' (unattributed) 21-22; 'How the Tortoise Won the Tug of War' a story from Central Africa (unattributed) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 34-36; 'The Easter Rabbit' a story from Central Europe (unattributed) 38-41; 'The Woman in the Moon' a story from Nauru (unattributed) 43-46; 'The Race' (unattributed) 48-50; 'The Tar Baby' retold from Uncle Remus by Joel Chandler Harris, illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 51-54; 'What the Moon Told' by Hans Christian Andersen, 55-56; 'The Cobbler and the Elves' by The Brothers Grimm, illustrated by W. S. Wemyss, 57-60; 'Brier Rose' (unattributed) 65-68; 'The Faithful Worker' (unattributed) 84-85; 'Miss Brown Bulb and the Sparrow' (from Tiny Tots) 93-97; 'The Golden Bird in the King's Garden' (from The Children's Encyclopaedia) illustrated by W.S. Wemyss, 99-107; 'What Bright-Eyes Wanted' (from R. De Witt in The Prize) 110-114; 'Rags and Tatters' (from The School Journal New Zealand) illustrated by W.S. Wemyss, 115-120; 'The Little Mother' (translation from the French in the Strand Magazine) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 129-137;

      • Poetry: 'The Swing' by Robert Louis Stevenson, illustrated, 1; 'London Bridge' (unattributed) illustrated, 7; 'Where go the Boats' by R.L. Stevenson, illustrated by Elsie Jean Timmings, 13;'The Naughty Boy' by English poet John Keats (1795-1821) 15; 'My Dog' by American writer Emily Lewis, 17;'A Boy's Song' by Scottish poet James Hogg (1770-1835) 32; 'Fairies' by English writer Rose Fyleman, 33; 'The Wind' by R.L. Stevenson, illustrated, 37;' Robin Redbreast' by William Allingham, 47;' The Sleepy Son' by American writer Josephine Daskam Bacon, 50-51; 'The Wonderful World' by English poet William Brighty Rands (1823-1882) 56; 'Who Stole the Bird's Nest' by American Maria L. Child (1802-1880) illustrated by W.S. Wemyss, 61-64; 'The Clouds' (unattributed) 34-35;68-69; 'Boats Sail on the Rivers' by English poet Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830-1894), illustrated, 77; 'The Owl and the Pussy-Cat' by English poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) 82-83; 'The Fairies' by Irish author William Allingham (1824-1889) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 86-89; 'The Blind Men and the Elephant : A Hindu Fable' by American poet John Godfrey Saxe (1816-1887) 91-92; 'Evening Song' by English poet C. Frances Alexander, 98; 'The Land of Story-books' by Scottish poet Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) illustrated by Elsie Jean McKissock, 107-109; 'Some One' by English writer Walter De La Mare, 114; 'Little Boy Blue' by American writer Eugene Field, illustrated, 120-121; 'Santa Claus' (unattributed) illustrated by W.S.Wemyss, 126-128;

      • Drama: 'The Three Wishes' from a story by the Brothers Grimm, 78-82;

      • Other material: Spelling list, 139-140; Notes and Exercises, 141-152.

      Series: y Victorian Readers The Victorian Reading-Books Victorian Department of Education (publisher), Charles R. Long (editor), Melbourne : Victorian Department of Education , 1928-1930 Z1417172 1928-1930 series - publisher anthology

      Preface to Victorian Readers: Eighth Book (1929):

      As the need for a Primer and First Book of modern type and for the provision of more space in The School Paper for articles of current interest had been felt for some time, it was decided last year [1927] to proceed with the preparation of a series of reading books (eight in number) to be published by the Government Printer. The selection of matter and the obtaining of drawings from local artists to illustrate it were entrusted to committees of inspectors and teachers, with Mr. J. C. Lowry, B.A. (a senior inspector of schools), as chairman, and Mr. C. R. Long, M.A., as editor.

      This book - the most advanced of the projected series - is the first to be issued. The main aim of the committee that made the selections for it was to obtain such as possessed literary merit, were informative, were likely to arouse interest, and were suitable as regards the average standard of attainment of the grade or forms for which the book was intended. The young readers were to begin at home, to be taken in imagination to various parts of the Empire, to Europe, and to the United States of America, and thus to gain knowledge of their rich heritage and acquire a well-founded pride of race. The inculcation of sound morality was always to be kept in view, and support given to the creation of a feeling against international strife and to the implanting of a desire for world-wide toleration. The grouping of the selections (story, essay, poem etc.) in order to secure continuity of thought - one selection serving to reveal and support another - was to be aimed at throughout, so that the contents of the book might not be a mere collection of unrelated items, but approach as nearly as possible to a unity.

      The committee was of the opinion that notes and explanations to aid in the securing of intelligent reading would be advantageous, but that they should not be unduly elaborate or very numerous, and that they should form a section at the end of the book. It is hoped that those which have been provided will not only prove helpful in themselves, but will also suggest interesting lines of study (critical, etymological, biographical, historical, geographical, etc) that may be followed up to advantage by some of the young readers, if not by all.

      Though it was recognized that the local production of a series of reading-books to compare favourably with those issued by leading British publishers would not be easy of accomplishment, yet it was believed that the effect of the use of such a series in the schools and in the pupils' homes would make the effort well worth while.

      Number in series: 3
Last amended 2 Jan 2008 10:57:00
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