My Brother Jack extract   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1988 1988
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Notes

  • Translation of Chapter XIII.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Mia Frato Jocjo
Language: Esperanto
  • Appears in:
    y Australia Antologio Alan Towsey (editor), Pisa : Edistudio , 1988 Z1200264 1988 anthology poetry novel prose short story Anthology of poems and extracts from literary works by Australian authors, translated by various people into Esperanto. Works have been indexed if the extract could be positively identified. Other translations include the works of Charles Harpur, Rolf Boldrewood, Henry Kendall, Joseph Furphy, Marcus Clarke, Henry Lawson, Steele Rudd, Christopher Brennan, Walter Murdoch, C. E. W. Bean, Frank Dalby Davison, R. D. Fitzgerald, Douglas Stewart, David Campbell, Donald Horne, Dick Roughsey, Peter Carey, Robert Drewe, Andrew Lansdown and Peter Dodds McCormick. Pisa : Edistudio , 1988 pg. 249-256

Works about this Work

Tiny Leaf Men and Other Tales From Outer Suburbia : Re-Presenting the Suburb in Australian Children’s Literature Kelly-Elise Oliver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 21 no. 1 2011; (p. 57-66)
'This paper explores how, through word and image, Tan's Tales From Outer Suburbia challenges stereotypical representations of the suburban. Typically, suburban spaces have been represented as aesthetically bland, mundane, and ornamental. Tan takes these tropes and ironically re-deploys them anew, and in doing so undermines anti-suburban sentiment, which has dominated Australian literary and popular culture.

Although the notion of anti-suburbanism in Australian fiction has been well documented, its presence in children's literature has received far less attention. As a case study, Tales From Outer Suburbia, signals the ability of children's literature to present more positive representations of suburbia because of its inherent commitment to the socialisation of children, which is prioritised over the tradition of anti-suburbanism.' (Author's abstract)
Tiny Leaf Men and Other Tales From Outer Suburbia : Re-Presenting the Suburb in Australian Children’s Literature Kelly-Elise Oliver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 21 no. 1 2011; (p. 57-66)
'This paper explores how, through word and image, Tan's Tales From Outer Suburbia challenges stereotypical representations of the suburban. Typically, suburban spaces have been represented as aesthetically bland, mundane, and ornamental. Tan takes these tropes and ironically re-deploys them anew, and in doing so undermines anti-suburban sentiment, which has dominated Australian literary and popular culture.

Although the notion of anti-suburbanism in Australian fiction has been well documented, its presence in children's literature has received far less attention. As a case study, Tales From Outer Suburbia, signals the ability of children's literature to present more positive representations of suburbia because of its inherent commitment to the socialisation of children, which is prioritised over the tradition of anti-suburbanism.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 7 Sep 2007 14:09:40
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