Lads of the Village single work   musical theatre   revue/revusical   humour  
Alternative title: The Village Lads; Mr Mulligan, Millionaire; The Boys of the Village
Issue Details: First known date: 1924 1924
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Revusical.

George Wallace plays Brutus (a bad egg), who impersonates a wandering millionaire turned country grocer by the name of Mulligan. According to one review, Brutus succeeds 'admirably in making a complete mess of things' (Brisbane Courier 1 February 1926, p.15). The other characters include Mike Shannon (the village storekeeper who attempts to get Mulligan to marry one of his daughters), Josh McCosh (an avaricious farmer), Harry Dale (a wanderer), Milly Smith (a farmer's daughter), Murphy Lee, and village lasses Dolly Davis and Nellie Jones. The Argus theatre critic writes in 1925, too, that 'the stage settings harmonised with the amusing plot' (22 June 1925, p.14).

In reviewing the 1930 revival, staged under the title Mr Mulligan, Millionaire, the Age further records:

Mr Mulligan, Millionaire is a furore from start to finish, and in it Mr Wallace, who plays the part of Brutus, and is supposed to be a little bit silly, is seen and heard at his best. The revue was written by himself, and the scene of action is a country town aptly named Sleepy Hollow. Brutus posing as a multi-millionaire, purchases the business of the local storekeeper, Mike Shannon, a part played capably by Marshall Crosby. One condition of the purchase is that the cash in the tills be included in the stock in trade - a concession which Mike concedes when he realises there is a hope of Brutus marrying one of his daughters. This plan, however, does not develop. Once in charge of the store Brutus makes things fast and furious, and his efforts in attending to the wants of his customers make the house rock with laughter. The musical side of the revue is of a high order, even though it includes several burlesque numbers. In these George Wallace again takes the lead, and the manner in which he conducts the Flaming Youths band while playing in Sleepy Hollow is side-splitting. He is well supported by members of the band (13 January 1930, p.11).

Among the vocal numbers for the 1926 production were 'South of Carolina' (sung by the company), 'Hula Lou' (George Wallace), 'Mountains of Morne' (Marshall Crosby), and 'I'll See You in my Dreams' (Marie Nyman). The 1930 Tivoli production included Marshall Crosby's rendition of 'The Floral Dance.'

Notes

  • It is unclear if there is any relationship between this revusical and one of George Wallace's earliest works, Mulligan's Mix-up (1922).

    There appears to be no relationship (apart from the similarity of titles) with a 1917 English revusical written by James W. Tate (music), Frank Clifford Harris (lyrics), and Archibald Thomas Pechey, aka 'Valentine' (book).

Production Details

  • 1924: Majestic Theatre, Newtown, Sydney, 20-26 September.

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace (Brutus), Marshall Crosby (Mike), Tom Lincoln, Jack White, George Lloyd, Harry Burgess, Marie Nyman, Nellie Dean, Pat Reid, and the Six Rascals.

    1925: Fullers' Theatre, Sydney, 11-17 April (as The Boys of the Village).

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Marie Nyman, Jack White, Tom Lincoln, Ivy Moore, Sadie Gale, Nellie Dean, and the Six Rascals.

    1925: Bijou Theatre, Melbourne, 20-26 June (as The Village Lads).

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Sadie Gale, Olga Muir, Tom Lincoln, Jack White, Nellie Dean, sisters Lulu Fanning and Mercia Elliott, George Lloyd, Fred 'Check' Hayes, Ada Scaddan, and the Six Rascals (incl. Alma Stewart).
    • Sadie Gale left the company in late October 1925.

    1925: Empire Theatre, Brisbane ; 14-20 November (return season: 30 January 1925 - 5 February 1926).

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Marie Nyman (Milly), Nellie Dean, Lulla Fanning (Dolly), Ada Scaddan (Nellie), Jack White, Frank Haining (Josh), Frederick 'Check' Hayes (Harry), Tom Lincoln (Murphy Lee), and the Six Rascals (Alma Stewart, Eileen Smith, Hilary Salmon, Phyllis Lough, Doris Whimp, Isobel Broadfoot).

    1927: New Bijou Theatre, Melbourne, 19-25 February.

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Marie Nyman, Ada Scaddan, Frank Haining, Tom Lincoln, and the Six Rascals.

    .

  • 1928: Bijou Theatre, Melbourne, 27 October - 2 November.

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Fullers' Theatres Ltd.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Marie Nyman, Maida Jones, Ada Scadden, Frank Haining, Tom Lincoln, Jack Scott, and the Six Rascals.
    • Musicians Five Flaming Youths.

    1930: Tivoli Theatre, Melbourne, 11-17 January (as Mr Mulligan, Millionaire).

    • Director George Wallace; Producer Tivoli Celebrity Vaudeville Pty Ltd; Chorus Maurice Diamond.
    • Troupe George Wallace Revue Company.
    • Cast incl. George Wallace, Marshall Crosby, Keith Connelly, Bert Dudley, Tup Dudley Jim Romaine, Irene Shamrock, Bebe Scott, Leonard Rich, John V. Dobbie, Jack Grant, and the Eight Rascals
    • Musicians Five Flaming Youths Jazz Band.

    1931: Theatre Royal, Brisbane; 11-17 April

    • Director George Wallace; Producer/Lessee Harry R. Kitching
    • Cast incl. George Wallace (Brutus), Jack Ashworth, Phyllis Baker, John Dobbie, Bob Graham, Bert Dudley, Evelyn, Dudley, Billy Kerhsaw, Maida Jones; the Eight Rascals.
    • The company also provided the first part vaudeville programme (which included Wallace's sketch 'Oh What a Night').

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Tivoli Theatre - George Wallace in 'Mr Mulligan, Millionaire' 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 January 1930; (p. 11)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
George Wallace Revue: Change at Tivoli 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 13 January 1930; (p. 10)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
A review of Mr Mulligan, Millionaire which was previoulsy known as The Oojah Bird.
Bijou Theatre 1928 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 29 October 1928; (p. 10)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
Bijou - Vaudeville 1925 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 22 June 1925; (p. 14)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
Bijou Theatre 1928 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 29 October 1928; (p. 10)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
Bijou - Vaudeville 1925 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 22 June 1925; (p. 14)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
Tivoli Theatre - George Wallace in 'Mr Mulligan, Millionaire' 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 January 1930; (p. 11)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
George Wallace Revue: Change at Tivoli 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 13 January 1930; (p. 10)

— Review of Lads of the Village George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
A review of Mr Mulligan, Millionaire which was previoulsy known as The Oojah Bird.

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

Note:
This entry has been sourced from research undertaken by Dr Clay Djubal into Australian-written popular music theatre (ca. 1850-1930). See also the Australian Variety Theatre Archive
Last amended 10 Aug 2016 07:41:01
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