1925703815652610203.jpg
Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Jindabyne single work   film/TV   thriller   crime   mystery  
Adaptation of So Much Water So Close To Home Raymond Carver 1977 single work short story
Issue Details: First known date: 2006 2006
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The story of a murder and a marriage. A powerful and original film about the things that haunt us.'

Source: Screen Australia. (Sighted: 2/8/2013)

Notes

  • As Nathanael O'Reilly points out in 'Joining the Dots: Paul Kelly Sings About Place', there is a complex inter-relationship between American writer Raymond Carver, this film, and musician Paul Kelly.

    Raymond Carver's short story 'So Much Water So Close to Home' appeared in 1977 as part of the collection Furious Seasons.

    In 1989 (a year after Carver's death), Paul Kelly (then working as Paul Kelly and the Messengers) released the album So Much Water So Close to Home, which took its title from Carver's short story. The album included the song 'Everything's Turning to White', which was explicitly based on 'So Much Water So Close to Home'.

    In 2006, Paul Kelly co-wrote the score for Jindabyne, which is an adaptation of Carver's story.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Joining the Dots : Paul Kelly Sings About Place Nathanael O'Reilly , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 425-430)
Adaptation for the Postcolonial Community : Jindabyne’s Contested Spaces Renate Brosch , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Anglia : Zeitschrift fur Englische Philologie , October vol. 130 no. 3 2012; (p. 364–377)
'In this article, I discuss the Australian film Jindabyne, an adaptation of Raymond Carver's short story "So Much Water So Close to Home". Starting from the premise of contemporary adaptation studies, that such remediations should not be judged on the basis of fidelity to the literary source, I argue that the achievement of Jindabyne lies in its very deviations from the text. By transporting the story to an Australian setting, the film introduces the issue of interracial relations into the narrative and thus adds a postcolonial dimension to the story. Instead of focusing on individual psychology and the marital problems of a couple, the film shifts the focus to the social effects of the denial of historical culpability on the part of white Australians. I investigate the techniques and strategies which produce interest in a small-town community burdened with the continuing heritage of colonial injustice, especially the film's use of visual images as a means of transnational appeal. Images of borders and border-crossings express its engagement with interracial proximity and conflict. In my response-oriented interpretation I hope to show how the movie succeeds in enlisting the participation of viewers and uniting them into a temporary "imaginary community" with a postcolonial agenda.' Renate Brosch.
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
'Everything's Turning to White' : Palimpsestuous Revelations Make in the Journey from Jindabyne to Jindabyne Erica Hateley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 23 no. 2 2009; (p. 141-146)
'In this paper I am reading Jindabyne as a significant place and its sustained filmic representation in Ray Lawrence's Jindabyne (2006) in order to consider how we might begin to understand Australianness as a kind of haunted subjectivity but as\lso as one that might be reframed within or by a politics of becoming. Just as Thrift calls up a trope of water on land in his 'reservoir of meanings,' so too does Lawrence's film consider the symbolic meanings and resultse that come of Australian water on/and Australian land.' (p. 141)
Adapting Australian Film : Ray Lawrence from Bliss to Jindabyne Jonathan Rayner , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 3 2009; (p. 295-308)
'This article offers a reconsideration of the films and career of Ray Lawrence, a critically acclaimed Australian director whose most recent film Jindabyne was a national and international successes in 2006. Although to date his output consists of just three feature films completed since 1985, Lawrence's work can be seen to embody, unite and typify several disparate ideals, debates and tendencies present within Australian film-making over the past twenty years.' (Author's abstract)
Burning Bad News Fiona Gruber , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 13 July no. 5441 2007; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Fishy Business Sandy George , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 July 2006; (p. 4-5)
The World Takes a Shine to a Town Like Jindabyne Andree Stephens , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 1 July 2006; (p. 1)
Back Story Tom Ryan , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 23 July 2006; (p. 10)
Traces the influence of American writer, Raymond Carver's short story 'So Much Water So Close to Home' on the Ausralian film Jindabye and other works.
Hook, Line and a Floater Stephanie Bunbury , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 21 July 2006; (p. 7)
Starry Night Shines Over Jindabyne Sandy George , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 17 July 2006; (p. 3)
Beneath the Sublime Sky Sandra Hall , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15-16 July 2006; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Haunted by History Evan Williams , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 22-23 July 2006; (p. 22)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Something Nasty in the Watershed Tom Ryan , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 23 July 2006; (p. 10)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Hooked on Jindabyne Jane Freebury , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 July 2006; (p. 24)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Catch of the Day Craig Mathieson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 July vol. 124 no. 6530 2006; (p. 70-71)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
River Role for an Artistic Soul Jo Litson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 - 16 July 2006; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Snowy Murder a Family Affair Douglas Kennedy , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 23 July 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
A Matter of Life and Death Chris Bartlett , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 23 July 2006; (p. 11)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Beneath the Sublime Sky Sandra Hall , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15-16 July 2006; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Haunted by History Evan Williams , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 22-23 July 2006; (p. 22)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Something Nasty in the Watershed Tom Ryan , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 23 July 2006; (p. 10)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Hooked on Jindabyne Jane Freebury , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 July 2006; (p. 24)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Catch of the Day Craig Mathieson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 July vol. 124 no. 6530 2006; (p. 70-71)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
River Role for an Artistic Soul Jo Litson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 - 16 July 2006; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Snowy Murder a Family Affair Douglas Kennedy , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 23 July 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
A Matter of Life and Death Chris Bartlett , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 23 July 2006; (p. 11)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
ArtsFilm Colin Bushell , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 2 - 8 August no. 598 2006; (p. 24)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
More Challenges than Resolutions in Jindabyne Jemma Galvin , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 8 August vol. 16 no. 10 2006;

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Deep Water Margaret Pomeranz , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , August 2006; (p. 56)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Burning Bad News Fiona Gruber , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 13 July no. 5441 2007; (p. 15)

— Review of Jindabyne Beatrix Christian 2006 single work film/TV
Fishy Business Sandy George , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 July 2006; (p. 4-5)
The World Takes a Shine to a Town Like Jindabyne Andree Stephens , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 1 July 2006; (p. 1)
Back Story Tom Ryan , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 23 July 2006; (p. 10)
Traces the influence of American writer, Raymond Carver's short story 'So Much Water So Close to Home' on the Ausralian film Jindabye and other works.
Hook, Line and a Floater Stephanie Bunbury , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 21 July 2006; (p. 7)
Starry Night Shines Over Jindabyne Sandy George , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 17 July 2006; (p. 3)
'Everything's Turning to White' : Palimpsestuous Revelations Make in the Journey from Jindabyne to Jindabyne Erica Hateley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 23 no. 2 2009; (p. 141-146)
'In this paper I am reading Jindabyne as a significant place and its sustained filmic representation in Ray Lawrence's Jindabyne (2006) in order to consider how we might begin to understand Australianness as a kind of haunted subjectivity but as\lso as one that might be reframed within or by a politics of becoming. Just as Thrift calls up a trope of water on land in his 'reservoir of meanings,' so too does Lawrence's film consider the symbolic meanings and resultse that come of Australian water on/and Australian land.' (p. 141)
Adapting Australian Film : Ray Lawrence from Bliss to Jindabyne Jonathan Rayner , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 3 2009; (p. 295-308)
'This article offers a reconsideration of the films and career of Ray Lawrence, a critically acclaimed Australian director whose most recent film Jindabyne was a national and international successes in 2006. Although to date his output consists of just three feature films completed since 1985, Lawrence's work can be seen to embody, unite and typify several disparate ideals, debates and tendencies present within Australian film-making over the past twenty years.' (Author's abstract)
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Adaptation for the Postcolonial Community : Jindabyne’s Contested Spaces Renate Brosch , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Anglia : Zeitschrift fur Englische Philologie , October vol. 130 no. 3 2012; (p. 364–377)
'In this article, I discuss the Australian film Jindabyne, an adaptation of Raymond Carver's short story "So Much Water So Close to Home". Starting from the premise of contemporary adaptation studies, that such remediations should not be judged on the basis of fidelity to the literary source, I argue that the achievement of Jindabyne lies in its very deviations from the text. By transporting the story to an Australian setting, the film introduces the issue of interracial relations into the narrative and thus adds a postcolonial dimension to the story. Instead of focusing on individual psychology and the marital problems of a couple, the film shifts the focus to the social effects of the denial of historical culpability on the part of white Australians. I investigate the techniques and strategies which produce interest in a small-town community burdened with the continuing heritage of colonial injustice, especially the film's use of visual images as a means of transnational appeal. Images of borders and border-crossings express its engagement with interracial proximity and conflict. In my response-oriented interpretation I hope to show how the movie succeeds in enlisting the participation of viewers and uniting them into a temporary "imaginary community" with a postcolonial agenda.' Renate Brosch.
Joining the Dots : Paul Kelly Sings About Place Nathanael O'Reilly , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 425-430)
Last amended 11 Mar 2015 14:30:39
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  • Jindabyne, Jindabyne - Eucumbene area, Cooma - Snowy - Bombala area, Southeastern NSW, New South Wales,
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