Issue Details: First known date: 2006 2006
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An anthology comprising works by eighty-six Australian poets, from James Brunton Stephens to contemporary writes such as Bronwyn Lea and Michael Brennan, that offer Australian perspectives on Asia.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Pandanus Books , 2006 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
My Chinee Cooki"They who say the bush is dull are not so very far astray,", J. Brunton Stephens , 1873 single work poetry (p. 9-11)
My Other Chinee Cooki"Yes, I got another Johnny; but he was to Number One", J. Brunton Stephens , 1873 single work poetry humour (p. 12-14)
The Pearl Diveri"Kanzo Makame, the diver, sturdy and small Japanee,", A. B. Paterson , 1902 single work poetry (p. 15-17)
A Vision of Empiresi"One night across a magic glass", Victor J. Daley , 1904 single work poetry (p. 18-21)
The Tracks that Lie by Indiai"Now this is not a dismal song, like some I've sung of late,", Henry Lawson , 1905 single work poetry (p. 22-23)
To Be Amusedi"You ask me to be gay and glad", Henry Lawson , 1984 single work poetry (p. 24-26)
A Villanelle of Thursday Islandi""Sayonara," she sighed, and she flirted her fan,", Macheti , 1907 single work poetry (p. 27)
19-?i"Asia moved down upon the Southern Land.", H. C. McKay , 1908 single work poetry (p. 28)
A Word in Seasoni"Sit down and go on with your beer, Brother White, and think on the future no more,", Frank Henty , 1909 single work poetry (p. 29-31)
An Appreciationi"When me come from China-land, plenty time ago,", Kaban , 1909 single work poetry (p. 32-33)
In the Jap Quarteri"Lotus land, lanterns alight", Louis Esson , 1909 single work poetry (p. 40-41)
Our Black Brudderi"O, fellow Australians, listen, attend:", Den , 1909 single work poetry (p. 42-43)
The Enlightened Lamai"The wonders of Darjeeling,", Ganesha , 1910 single work poetry (p. 44-46)
Peace in Tibeti"How delicious to know there is peace in Tibet!", E. O'F , 1912 single work poetry (p. 47-48)
Chinai"Conscious of teeming cities", Alice Gore-Jones , 1919 single work poetry (p. 49-50)
Fourteen Meni"Fourteen men,", Mary Gilmore , 1954 single work poetry (p. 51)
The Opium Pipei"Upon a mat the Chinese smoker lay,", Louis Esson , 1913 single work poetry (p. 52-53)
From a Balconyi"From my small balcony I used to watch", G.J. , 1915 single work poetry (p. 54)
Two Japanese Songs : 1 : The Heart of a Birdi"What does the bird-seller know of the heart of a bird?", Dorothea Mackellar , 1911 single work poetry (p. 56)
Two Japanese Songs : 2 : A Smoke Songi"There is a grey plume of smoke in the horizon,", Dorothea Mackellar , 1911 single work poetry (p. 57)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Writing Asian Poetry in English Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 13 2013;

'If you open a collection by a contemporary Australian poet, you’re likely to find poems in forms derived from various Asian literary traditions: haiku, ghazal, tanka and other verse forms that originate in the swathe of cultures from the Arabian Gulf in the West to Japan in the North and Indonesia in the South. This is not new, of course. Nineteenth-century French poets, including Baudelaire, were attracted by the pantoum (pantun), a traditional Malay verse form. John Ashbery and other Americans followed suit in the twentieth-century. Contemporary Australian poet Mike Ladd acknowledges this lineage in ‘Pantuns in the Orchard’ (Island, Spring 2011), a recent essay about his experiments with the form during a residency at Rimbun Dahan in Malaysia.' (Author's introduction)

The Poetics of Subalternity Michelle Cahill , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 11 2012;
'This essay attempts to assemble a radical critique of contemporary Australian literature, which in its orientation and its networks of power and interest inaugurates itself as a subject in the guise of nationalism while ignoring the divisions of cultural capital and labour. This is an exclusive and essentially White paradigm that articulates difference in Euro-Imperialist terms, elaborating discourses of difference, counter-narratives, multiculturalism, postcolonialism and non-determination while concealing its agency, its neo-colonisation and domination of Otherness. And by "Other" I am referring generally to those marginalised and disempowered by the narratives of Australian literature, history, law, political economy and adopted ideology (of the West, that is) and I am speaking as an Asian Australian writer unfortunately privy to the gatekeepers of Australian literary culture. I'll have to ask you to indulge me in that my essay is an intentionally polemic commentary, embedded in a space I enter as a writer of colour, hybridity and Asian background rather than as Anglo-academic or cultural theorist. And I make this entreaty because in advancing my argument I am aware of causing dichotomies to arise within the trace of this text.' (Author's introduction)
East–West Turnings : Australian and American Poetry in Light of Asia Paul Kane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 107-118)

'I want to suggest in this essay something unremarkable, in the sense that it has already been remarked upon quite a lot: that both American and Australian poetry engages with the East in significant ways...With the rise of postcolonial studies, we have learned a good deal about the intersections of history, culture, power and perception. This has become not so much a field of study as a veritable Outback of study, except it isn't Outback at all: it's front and centre. But perhaps because the point is so obvious to us now we might gain something by looking at it afresh, or at least again.

My interest here, however, is not primarily in postcolonial perspectives or orientalism or subaltern studies or other similar undertakings, which typically analyse structures of dominance and resistance and illuminate ideological implications and mystifications. Indeed, the superabundance of such studies is already in excess of anything I could add. Nor am I considering the wealth of literary works that constitute Asian-American or Asian-Australian literature. My perspective is more limited, and perhaps...unremarkable. I simply want to suggest that the East so-called has also functioned as generative force - whether as provocation or inspiration - for certain poets in Australia and America, beginning in the nineteenth century and especially recently, and that there are some unusual features to this phenomenon worthy of inspection. I am going to note several examples of such poets and then say something about possible conclusions we might draw as we look to the future.' (pp. 107-108)

Collecting the Contemporary : Australian Poetry Anthologies in the 'Noughties' Cameron Fuller , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Poems in Perspex : Max Harris Poetry Award 2007 2008; (p. 112-118)
Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry Shane McCauley , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Indigo , Winter no. 1 2007; (p. 96-98)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Looking Out at the Lights : New Poetry Kerry Leves , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 189 2007; (p. 77-79)

— Review of The Passenger Laurie Duggan 2006 selected work poetry ; Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry ; The War Sonnets Barry Hill 2006 selected work poetry ; Love in the Place of Rats Paul Hardacre 2007 selected work poetry ; Jack Judy Johnson 2006 single work novel ; Portrait of a Friendship : The Letters of Barbara Blackman and Judith Wright 1950-2000 Barbara Blackman Judith Wright 2007 selected work correspondence ; Not Finding Wittgenstein J. S. Harry 2007 selected work poetry
Untitled Robin Gerster , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 3 2007; (p. 231-234)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Asia at Home David McCooey , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 284 2006; (p. 34-35)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Untitled Margaret Bradstock , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Five Bells , Spring vol. 13 no. 4 2006; (p. 51-52)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Poetry Anthony Lynch , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 22 and 29 December no. 5412/3 2006; (p. 38)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Asia at Home David McCooey , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 284 2006; (p. 34-35)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Untitled Margaret Bradstock , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Five Bells , Spring vol. 13 no. 4 2006; (p. 51-52)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Poetry Anthony Lynch , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 22 and 29 December no. 5412/3 2006; (p. 38)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry Shane McCauley , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Indigo , Winter no. 1 2007; (p. 96-98)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
Looking Out at the Lights : New Poetry Kerry Leves , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 189 2007; (p. 77-79)

— Review of The Passenger Laurie Duggan 2006 selected work poetry ; Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry ; The War Sonnets Barry Hill 2006 selected work poetry ; Love in the Place of Rats Paul Hardacre 2007 selected work poetry ; Jack Judy Johnson 2006 single work novel ; Portrait of a Friendship : The Letters of Barbara Blackman and Judith Wright 1950-2000 Barbara Blackman Judith Wright 2007 selected work correspondence ; Not Finding Wittgenstein J. S. Harry 2007 selected work poetry
Untitled Robin Gerster , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 3 2007; (p. 231-234)

— Review of Windchimes : Asia in Australian Poetry 2006 anthology poetry
East–West Turnings : Australian and American Poetry in Light of Asia Paul Kane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 107-118)

'I want to suggest in this essay something unremarkable, in the sense that it has already been remarked upon quite a lot: that both American and Australian poetry engages with the East in significant ways...With the rise of postcolonial studies, we have learned a good deal about the intersections of history, culture, power and perception. This has become not so much a field of study as a veritable Outback of study, except it isn't Outback at all: it's front and centre. But perhaps because the point is so obvious to us now we might gain something by looking at it afresh, or at least again.

My interest here, however, is not primarily in postcolonial perspectives or orientalism or subaltern studies or other similar undertakings, which typically analyse structures of dominance and resistance and illuminate ideological implications and mystifications. Indeed, the superabundance of such studies is already in excess of anything I could add. Nor am I considering the wealth of literary works that constitute Asian-American or Asian-Australian literature. My perspective is more limited, and perhaps...unremarkable. I simply want to suggest that the East so-called has also functioned as generative force - whether as provocation or inspiration - for certain poets in Australia and America, beginning in the nineteenth century and especially recently, and that there are some unusual features to this phenomenon worthy of inspection. I am going to note several examples of such poets and then say something about possible conclusions we might draw as we look to the future.' (pp. 107-108)

The Poetics of Subalternity Michelle Cahill , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 11 2012;
'This essay attempts to assemble a radical critique of contemporary Australian literature, which in its orientation and its networks of power and interest inaugurates itself as a subject in the guise of nationalism while ignoring the divisions of cultural capital and labour. This is an exclusive and essentially White paradigm that articulates difference in Euro-Imperialist terms, elaborating discourses of difference, counter-narratives, multiculturalism, postcolonialism and non-determination while concealing its agency, its neo-colonisation and domination of Otherness. And by "Other" I am referring generally to those marginalised and disempowered by the narratives of Australian literature, history, law, political economy and adopted ideology (of the West, that is) and I am speaking as an Asian Australian writer unfortunately privy to the gatekeepers of Australian literary culture. I'll have to ask you to indulge me in that my essay is an intentionally polemic commentary, embedded in a space I enter as a writer of colour, hybridity and Asian background rather than as Anglo-academic or cultural theorist. And I make this entreaty because in advancing my argument I am aware of causing dichotomies to arise within the trace of this text.' (Author's introduction)
Collecting the Contemporary : Australian Poetry Anthologies in the 'Noughties' Cameron Fuller , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Poems in Perspex : Max Harris Poetry Award 2007 2008; (p. 112-118)
Writing Asian Poetry in English Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 13 2013;

'If you open a collection by a contemporary Australian poet, you’re likely to find poems in forms derived from various Asian literary traditions: haiku, ghazal, tanka and other verse forms that originate in the swathe of cultures from the Arabian Gulf in the West to Japan in the North and Indonesia in the South. This is not new, of course. Nineteenth-century French poets, including Baudelaire, were attracted by the pantoum (pantun), a traditional Malay verse form. John Ashbery and other Americans followed suit in the twentieth-century. Contemporary Australian poet Mike Ladd acknowledges this lineage in ‘Pantuns in the Orchard’ (Island, Spring 2011), a recent essay about his experiments with the form during a residency at Rimbun Dahan in Malaysia.' (Author's introduction)

Last amended 14 Nov 2008 13:20:41
Subjects:
  • Asia,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X