y The Broken Wheel single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1996 1996
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Best known for her Phryne Fisher mystery novels, Greenwood turns her hand to SF in The Broken Wheel, a story set in a post-apocalyptic Australia and in which a medieval way of life has re-established law and order

[Source: Colin Steele, SF Commentary No 77, p.55]

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 1996 .
      Extent: 155p.
      ISBN: 0732256216 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
Beyond the Invisible Barrier : Australian Women Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy Jenny Pausacker , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 5 no. 1 1997; (p. 11-14)
Untitled Shelda Debowski , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 40 no. 3 1996; (p. 34)

— Review of The Broken Wheel Kerry Greenwood 1996 single work novel
Untitled Jo Goodman , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 11 no. 3 1996; (p. 34)

— Review of The Broken Wheel Kerry Greenwood 1996 single work novel
Untitled Shelda Debowski , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 40 no. 3 1996; (p. 34)

— Review of The Broken Wheel Kerry Greenwood 1996 single work novel
Untitled Jo Goodman , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 11 no. 3 1996; (p. 34)

— Review of The Broken Wheel Kerry Greenwood 1996 single work novel
Beyond the Invisible Barrier : Australian Women Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy Jenny Pausacker , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 5 no. 1 1997; (p. 11-14)
The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 12 Mar 2013 07:27:28
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