5277502867086933256.jpg
Cover of first edition courtesy of Wikipedia
y Slow Man single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Paul Rayment is on the threshold of a comfortable old age when a calamitous cycling accident results in the amputation of a leg. Humiliated, his body truncated, his life circumscribed, he turns away from his friends. He hires a nurse named Marijana, with whom he has a European childhood in common: hers in Croatia, his in France. Tactfully and efficiently she ministers to his needs. But his feelings for her, and for her handsome teenage son, are complicated by the sudden arrival on his doorstep of the celebrated Australian novelist Elizabeth Costello, who threatens to take over the direction of his life and the affairs of his heart. (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • This novel reintroduces the character of Elizabeth Costello from Coetzee's 2003 novel, Elizabeth Costello : Eight Lessons.
  • Included in the New York Times Book Review's 100 Notable Books of the Year list for 2005.
  • Editions and translations have been updated for Slow Man by Eilish Copelin as part of a Semester 2, 2013 scholar's internship. The selection and inclusion of these editions and translations was based on their availability through Australian libraries, namely through the search facilities of Libraries Australia and Trove (National Library of Australia).

    Given the international popularity of Coetzee's work, however, this record is not yet comprehensive. Editions and translations not widely available in Australia may not have been indexed. Furthermore, due to the enormous breadth of critical material on Coetzee's work, indexing of secondary sources is also not complete.

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, and electronic resource.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Knopf , 2005 .
      7127289724471950634.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 263p.
      ISBN: 1741660688 (hbk.), 9781741660685 (hbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 2005 .
      4385563994190406965.jpg
      Cover of first edition courtesy of Wikipedia
      Extent: 265p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      Note/s:
      • Copyright date is 2005.
      ISBN: 0436206110 (hbk.), 9780436206115 (hbk.)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking , 2005 .
      8881620333938323942.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 265p.
      Note/s:
      • This edition published with place of publication identified as both New York and Camberwell, Victoria: Viking, 2005.
      ISBN: 9780670034598 (hbk.), 0670034592 (hbk.)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      RB Large Print , 2005 .
      3855293547179115764.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 315p.
      Edition info: Large print ed.
      ISBN: 1419375970 (hbk), 9781419375972 (hbk)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 2006 .
      5053494370309328910.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 265p.
      ISBN: 0099490625 (pbk.), 9780099490623 (pbk.)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Penguin Books , 2006 .
      1111345850543374380.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 264p.
      ISBN: 0143037897 (pbk.), 9780143037897 (pbk.)
Alternative title: Langzame man
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cossee , 2005 .
      3019413013426009268.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 285p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      ISBN: 9059360737 (hbk), 9789059360730 (hbk)
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cossee , 2005 .
      9177308629845682733.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 285p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      ISBN: 9059363906 (pbk.), 9789059363908 (pbk.)
    • The Hague,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Stichting Uitgeverij XL , 2006 .
      Extent: 382p.
      Edition info: Large print ed.
      ISBN: 9046302938, 9789046302934
      Series: y XL The Hague : Stichting Uitgeverij XL , 1994 7962272 1994 series - publisher novel

      A series of large-print books published by Stichting Uitgeverij XL. Translations of J. M. Coetzee's novels feature in this series.

      Number in series: 1275
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cossee , 2013 .
      5166669851014313722.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 288p.
      Edition info: 7th ed.
      ISBN: 9059363906, 9789059363908, 9059364066 (ebook), 9789059364066 (ebook)

Works about this Work

y Sympathy for the Animal(ized) Other in Selected Works of J. M. Coetzee On Yue Joyce Chan , Hong Kong : 2015 8424922 2015 single work thesis

'Sympathy, understood to be the capacity to suffer with the other, has long been regarded as one of the major vehicles to inspire an ethical communion. By minimizing differences through identification, sympathy helps us resonate with other beings and to exist in relation to them. This thesis examines the ethical endeavors on the vexed question of sympathy in four works by J. M. Coetzee - - The Lives of Animals (1999), Disgrace (1999), Elizabeth Costello (2003) and Slow Man (2005), all of which manifest Coetzee's notable interest in a fully-engaged sympathetic imagination into depraved and deprived human or nonhuman subjects. ' (Thesis summary)

On Not Yet Being Christian : J.M. Coetzee's Slow Man and the Ethics of Being (Un)Interesting Craig Mitchell Smith , 2014 single work
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 9 no. 1 2014;

Since its publication, J.M. Coetzee's Slow Man has been received unenthusiastically. Its relative neglect suggests its failure to interest its readers as either a narrative to be read for the plot or as a text to be analyzed according to the prevailing values guiding contemporary literary criticism. Anticipating its own reception, Slow Man asks readers to consider the meaning of the novel’s failure to interest us greatly. Focussing self-consciously on an uninteresting character living in unremarkable times, Coetzee’s novel eschews a critical paradigm that invests in political urgency to make the ethical point that there are alternative values for judging the worth of a novel or character. In its search for affirmative values, Slow Man responds to the dilemmas of postcolonial postsecularism by suggesting that there are worse things a novelist might do than write an uninteresting book.

'A Dozy City' : Adelaide in J.M. Coetzee's Slow Man and Amy T. Matthew's End of the Night Girl Gillian Dooley , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Adelaide : A Literary City 2014; (p. 253-266)
Emigration and Photography in J.M. Coetzee’s Slow Man Donald Powers , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 49 no. 4 2013; (p. 458-469)
'This article examines how photographs in J.M. Coetzee’s novel Slow Man focus questions about the muteness and mutability of the historical record, particularly in the context of migrancy, while elaborating the metafictional dynamic between the protagonist Paul Rayment and his nominal author Elizabeth Costello. Drawing on the work on photography of Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag, the article argues that the dispute among the characters over Drago’s “forgery” of one of Rayment’s Fauchery photographs foregrounds how the past, in the retrievable form of a static photographic image, is available for reinterpretation and reconfiguring in the present. Whereas in the novels of a writer like W.G. Sebald black-and-white photographs are included as a sign of the silence around personal histories touched by communal trauma, in Slow Man colourless photographs function as a thematic motif to highlight such silences, and more centrally to emphasize how a personal history can be as readily assimilated to a collective history as superimposed over it.' (Editor's abstract)
Slow Man Overboard : J.M. Coetzee on Australian Hospitality Maria Takolander , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 539-545)
“What Used to Lie Outside the Frame” : Boundaries of Photography, Subjectivity and Fiction in Three Novels by J.M. Coetzee Ayala Amir , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , vol. 29 no. 4 2013; (p. 58-79)
'The concept of frame and its inherent tensions, as addressed by contemporary thinking, is the theoretical focus of this article, which examines representations of photography in three of J.M. Coetzee’s novels (Dusklands ([1974]1983), Age of Iron (1990) and Slow Man (2005)). Photography is treated as a site where Coetzee explores the issues that preoccupy him throughout his work: subjectivity, its boundaries and the possibility of intersubjectivity in relation to the very act of storytelling. The article offers a metaphorical reading of such elements of photography as the blow-up, the negative and digital photography in order to reflect upon Coetzee’s engagement with the possibility of openness to transformation, otherness and futurity implied by both the photographic frame and intersubjectivity in life as well as in fiction.' (Author's abstract)
Miguel de Cervantes and J.M. Coetzee : An Unacknowledged Paternity María J. López , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , vol. 29 no. 4 2013; (p. 80-97)
'This article points to the 17th-century Spanish writer, Miguel de Cervantes, as one important literary predecessor of the contemporary South African writer, J.M. Coetzee, a relation that has generally passed unnoticed among critics. This relation is brought to the foreground in Coetzee’s most recent novel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), but it also underlies his previous ones, Age of Iron (1998), Disgrace (2000), and Slow Man (2005), as well as his critical pieces, “The Novel Today” (1988) and the “Jerusalem Prize Acceptance Speech” (1992b), all of which contain echoes of Cervantes’s masterpiece, Don Quixote ([1605, 1615]2005). My argument is that the conflict between imagination and reality, the novel and history, central in Coetzee’s fictional and non-fictional production, needs to be re-examined as a fundamentally Cervantine one. The adventures and fate of Don Quixote lie behind Coetzee’s exploration of whether literature may be an effective and ethical guide in our dealings with reality, whether the ordinary may be transformed into the extraordinary, and of the relation between the literary imagination and the onslaughts of the real world.' (Publisher's blurb)
Abandoned Creatures : Creaturely Life and the Novel Form in J. M. Coetzee’s Slow Man Pieter Vermeulen , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in the Novel , Winter vol. 45 no. 4 2013; (p. 657-671)
Elizabeth Costello and the Ethics of Embodiment Elizabeth MacFarlane , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Scholar , 1 September vol. 1 no. 1 2011; (p. 57-68)
'In J. M. Coetzee's 2003 book Elizabeth Costello, the title character's son watches as she gives a painful radio interview, and thinks: 'A writer, not a thinker. Writers and thinkers: chalk and cheese. No, not chalk and cheese: fish and fowl. But which is she, the fish or the fowl? Which is her medium: water or air?' Coetzee's Costello books challenge the common divide between writing and thinking and raise various questions around the traditional elevation of reason above embodiment in contemporary scholarship. This paper takes the 'late style' of J. M. Coetzee's 2003 book Elizabeth Costello and 2005 book Slow Man and uses them as a lens through which to reread his previous books, both novels and criticism, while exploring Coetzee's preoccupation with the act of writing and the position of the writer. It also addresses the ethical questions surrounding fictional embodiment: Why embody another? what good does it do? could it, in fact, do harm? and in what terms are we to describe the relationship between author and character? In this paper I posit the language of analogy and metaphor, of figures of speech, as neither 'human weaknesses,' as philosophers like Thomas Nagel and Peter Singer may see them, nor as 'contagions,' but as sites of clarification, equivalent in many ways to the uneasy ethical lines between writer and written.' (Author's abstract)
J. M. Coetzee's Australian Realism Elleke Boehmer , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Poetics : Genre and Form 2011; (p. 202-218) Strong Opinions : J. M. Coetzee and the Authority of Contemporary Fiction 2011; (p. 3-18)
y Acts of Visitation : The Narrative of J.M. Coetzee María J. López , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2011 Z1880004 2011 single work criticism

'This study traces, in J.M. Coetzee's fictional and non-fictional production, an imaginative and intellectual masterplot deriving from Coetzee's perception of European presence in (South) Africa as having its origin in an act of illegitimate penetration and fraudulent visitation. In Coetzee's novels, the historical and political problem of a hostile occupation and unfair distribution of the land finds a correspondence in the domestic space of house and farm, and the uneasy cohabitation of its occupants, along with the relation between hosts and guests. The seminal dimension of the categories of penetration and visitation is highlighted, as these are shown to operate not only on a spatial level but also on an epistemological, physical, psychological, hermeneutic, metafictional and ethical one: we encounter literary and psychological secrets that resist decipherment, bodies that cannot be penetrated, writers depicted as intruders, parents that ask to be welcomed by their children.
This study also identifies, in Coetzee's narrative, an ethical proposal grounded on a logic of excess and unconditionality - a logic of 'not enough' - lying behind certain acts of hospitality, friendship, kindness, care, and guidance to the gate of death, acts that may transform prevailing unequal socio-historical conditions and hostile personal relationships, characterized by a logic of parasitism and intrusion. As the figure of the writer progressively gains explicit prominence in Coetzee's literary production, special attention will be paid to it, as it alternately appears as secretary and master, migrant and intruder, pervert and foe, citizen and neighbour. Overall, Acts of Visitation analyzes how Coetzee's works depict the (South) African land, the Karoo farm, the familial household or the writer's and literary character's house as simultaneously contending and redemptive sites in which urgent historical, ethical, and metafictional issues are spatially explored and dramatized.' (Publishers' website)

Works published before Coetzee's arrival in Australia including, Dusklands, In the Heart of the Country, Waiting for the Barbarians, Life &​ Times of Michael K, Age of Iron, Disgrace, Foe, Boyhood and The Master of Petersburg are also discussed in this critical work.

Melancholic Consolation? J. M. Coetzee, Irony and the Aesthetics of the Sublime Johan Geertsema , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Literature of Melancholia : Early Modern to Postmodern. 2011; (p. 240-253)
Cultural Criticism in the Australian Fiction Patrick Hayes , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: J. M. Coetzee and the Novel : Writing and Politics after Beckett 2010; (p. 223-259)
'This concluding chapter considers Coetzee's Australian fiction in relation to a longstanding tradition of cultural criticism directed at the moral and political condition of modernity. It has recently been argued that this tradition, for all its many differences of emphasis, has as its shared characteristic the deployment of a ‘cultural principle’ that displaces politics and itself lays claim to the role of social authority: this chapter sets Coetzee in the context of the most important new thinking about the tradition of cultural criticism, making special reference to the recent debate between Stefan Collini and Francis Mulhern. It shows that Coetzee sustainedly tries to refuse the moral and political simplifications that at times have characterized this tradition—allusion is made in particular to the work of Benda, Arnold, Nietzsche, and T. S. Eliot—and that his fiction opens up a line of cultural criticism that more subtly navigates the complex terrain of political modernity.' Source: Patrick Hayes.
Coming into Being: J. M. Coetzee's Slow Man and the Aesthetic of Hospitality Michael Marais , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , Summer vol. 50 no. 2 2009; (p. 273-298)
'While much of his critical work on J. M. Coetzee's writing is informed by a sophisticated understanding of Derridean hospitality, Derek Attridge has seldom used this term himself - the exception being his insightful reading of The Master of Petersburg ( J. M. Coetzee 122-24). In fact, very little criticism to date has examined Coetzee's use of the metaphor of hospitality in his writing. Focusing principally on Age of Iron, I briefly explore, in the first part of this essay, the incidence of this trope in this writer's earlier fiction. Thereafter, I trace his deployment of the language of hospitality in Slow Man, arguing that this metaphorical vocabulary inscribes a disjunction between the novel's medium and the kind of hospitality of which it attempts to speak. Coetzee's use of the trope of hospitality, I contend, in fact stages language's inability to achieve what this metaphor insists it must achieve. Although I do consider some of the points of intersection between his engagement with the idea of hospitality and that of thinkers such as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida, my purpose is not to speculate on Coetzee's philosophical allegiances but to consider his understanding of the implications of the ethic of hospitality for the writing and reading of narrative fiction.'(273)
y Secretary of the Invisible : The Idea of Hospitality in the Fiction of J. M. Coetzee Mike Marais , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2009 Z1687411 2009 single work criticism
Intertextuality and Other Analogues in J. M. Coetzee's Slow Man C. Kenneth Pellow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , Fall vol. 50 no. 3 2009; (p. 528-552)
y The Politics of Humiliation in the Novels of J.M. Coetzee Hania A. M. Nashef , New York (City) : Routledge , 2009 Z1781914 2009 single work criticism 'In this volume, Nashef looks at J.M. Coetzee's concern with universal suffering and the inevitable humiliation of the human being as manifest in his novels. Though several theorists have referred to the theme of human degradation in Coetzee's work, no detailed study has been made of this area of concern especially with respect to how pervasive it is across Coetzee's literary output to date. This study examines what J.M. Coetzee's novels portray as the circumstances that contribute to the humiliation of the individual--namely the abuse of language, master and slave interplay, aging and senseless waiting--and how these conditions can lead to the alienation and marginalization of the individual' (Publisher's blurb)
Limber : The Flexibilities of Post-Nobel Coetzee Patrick Denman Flanery , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Scrutiny 2 , May vol. 13 no. 1 2008; (p. 47-59)
"This article considers the publication of two excerpts from J.M. Coetzee's 2005 novel, Slow man. The first, appearing as "The blow" in The New Yorker magazine, is a silently edited version of the first fourteen chapters of the novel, which makes considerable stylistic changes, as well as transforming the text to perform as an autonomous piece of short fiction. The article considers both the context of its publication - Coetzee's first appearance in the magazine - as well as the symbolic and suggestive absences left by the magazine's editorial interventions. The second excerpt, in Bloomsbury's New beginnings charitable anthology (benefiting the Indian Ocean Tsunami Earthquake Charities), suggests the continued workings of Coetzee's acute awareness of the importance of place, as well as his investment in Australia (his home since 2002) and the larger Australasian region. Both cases offer suggestive instances of the placement of Coetzee's work as (arguably no-longer) "South African" cultural texts, at large in, and subject to the demands of, constructions of high art in global mediascapes. (47)
The Babushka Doll of Narrative Jane Sullivan , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 3 February 2007; (p. 30)
Coetzee's Haunting of Australian Literature Maria Takolander , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 37-51)
Takolander argues that: 'Literary texts, or arguably any texts -- including genre fiction, television soaps and blockbuster films -- in making possible an experience of haunting and thus of transformation occupy an ethical space'. She discusses ways in which J. M. Coetzee's novels Elizabeth Costello and Slow Man 'manifest a deep engagement with the transformative and ethical potentialities of literature'.
Cyclist Thrown By His Wounded Self Karen Lamb , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27-28 August 2005; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Identity and the Very Question of Existence Justin Cartwright , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 3 September 2005; (p. 12)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Playing with Words Katharine England , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 September 2005; (p. 10)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Portrait of Pain and Pity Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 3 September 2005; (p. 5)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Flawless on the Outside A. P. Riemer , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3-4 September 2005; (p. 19)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
The Novelist has Entered the Room Andrew Van Der Vlies , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 2 September no. 5344 2005; (p. 9-10)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Out on a Limb James Bradley , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 20 September vol. 123 no. 6488 2005; (p. 76-77)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Novel Almost Works Rosemary Sorensen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 10 - 11 September 2005; (p. 7)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Feature Review Max Oliver , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , September vol. 85 no. 3 2005; (p. 71)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Thesis, Antithesis, Prosthesis James Ley , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 275 2005; (p. 32-33)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Against Joie de vivre Ward Just , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 2 October vol. 110 no. 40 2005; (p. 20)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Sharp Turn Edwina Preston , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , October 2005; (p. 37)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Books of the Year Jonathan Lear , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 2 December no. 5357 2005; (p. 7)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Not Quite Quiet John Button , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 16 no. 1 2006; (p. 45)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Stony Ground Peter D. McDonald , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 20 October vol. 27 no. 20 2005; (p. 24-25)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Untitled Vicky Lebeau , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 947)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Untitled Gillian Dooley , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , 11 - 24 November no. 281 2005; (p. 21)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Novel Idea Almost Works Rosemary Sorensen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 10 - 11 September 2005; (p. 7)

— Review of Slow Man J. M. Coetzee 2005 single work novel
Coetzee on Man Booker Longlist 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 August 2005; (p. 16)
J. M. Coetzee at the National Library 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 274 2005; (p. 1)
The Babushka Doll of Narrative Jane Sullivan , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 3 February 2007; (p. 30)
Coetzee's Haunting of Australian Literature Maria Takolander , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 37-51)
Takolander argues that: 'Literary texts, or arguably any texts -- including genre fiction, television soaps and blockbuster films -- in making possible an experience of haunting and thus of transformation occupy an ethical space'. She discusses ways in which J. M. Coetzee's novels Elizabeth Costello and Slow Man 'manifest a deep engagement with the transformative and ethical potentialities of literature'.
Australian Fiction 2005-2006 Thomas Shapcott , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 51 no. 2006; (p. 108-119)
Limber : The Flexibilities of Post-Nobel Coetzee Patrick Denman Flanery , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Scrutiny 2 , May vol. 13 no. 1 2008; (p. 47-59)
"This article considers the publication of two excerpts from J.M. Coetzee's 2005 novel, Slow man. The first, appearing as "The blow" in The New Yorker magazine, is a silently edited version of the first fourteen chapters of the novel, which makes considerable stylistic changes, as well as transforming the text to perform as an autonomous piece of short fiction. The article considers both the context of its publication - Coetzee's first appearance in the magazine - as well as the symbolic and suggestive absences left by the magazine's editorial interventions. The second excerpt, in Bloomsbury's New beginnings charitable anthology (benefiting the Indian Ocean Tsunami Earthquake Charities), suggests the continued workings of Coetzee's acute awareness of the importance of place, as well as his investment in Australia (his home since 2002) and the larger Australasian region. Both cases offer suggestive instances of the placement of Coetzee's work as (arguably no-longer) "South African" cultural texts, at large in, and subject to the demands of, constructions of high art in global mediascapes. (47)
Double Gazing and Novel Spaces - Examining Narrated and Manifest Photographs in the Novel Peter Davis , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Double Dialogues , Winter no. 7 2007;
Coming into Being: J. M. Coetzee's Slow Man and the Aesthetic of Hospitality Michael Marais , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , Summer vol. 50 no. 2 2009; (p. 273-298)
'While much of his critical work on J. M. Coetzee's writing is informed by a sophisticated understanding of Derridean hospitality, Derek Attridge has seldom used this term himself - the exception being his insightful reading of The Master of Petersburg ( J. M. Coetzee 122-24). In fact, very little criticism to date has examined Coetzee's use of the metaphor of hospitality in his writing. Focusing principally on Age of Iron, I briefly explore, in the first part of this essay, the incidence of this trope in this writer's earlier fiction. Thereafter, I trace his deployment of the language of hospitality in Slow Man, arguing that this metaphorical vocabulary inscribes a disjunction between the novel's medium and the kind of hospitality of which it attempts to speak. Coetzee's use of the trope of hospitality, I contend, in fact stages language's inability to achieve what this metaphor insists it must achieve. Although I do consider some of the points of intersection between his engagement with the idea of hospitality and that of thinkers such as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida, my purpose is not to speculate on Coetzee's philosophical allegiances but to consider his understanding of the implications of the ethic of hospitality for the writing and reading of narrative fiction.'(273)
y Secretary of the Invisible : The Idea of Hospitality in the Fiction of J. M. Coetzee Mike Marais , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2009 Z1687411 2009 single work criticism
Intertextuality and Other Analogues in J. M. Coetzee's Slow Man C. Kenneth Pellow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , Fall vol. 50 no. 3 2009; (p. 528-552)
y The Politics of Humiliation in the Novels of J.M. Coetzee Hania A. M. Nashef , New York (City) : Routledge , 2009 Z1781914 2009 single work criticism 'In this volume, Nashef looks at J.M. Coetzee's concern with universal suffering and the inevitable humiliation of the human being as manifest in his novels. Though several theorists have referred to the theme of human degradation in Coetzee's work, no detailed study has been made of this area of concern especially with respect to how pervasive it is across Coetzee's literary output to date. This study examines what J.M. Coetzee's novels portray as the circumstances that contribute to the humiliation of the individual--namely the abuse of language, master and slave interplay, aging and senseless waiting--and how these conditions can lead to the alienation and marginalization of the individual' (Publisher's blurb)
Elizabeth Costello and the Ethics of Embodiment Elizabeth MacFarlane , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Scholar , 1 September vol. 1 no. 1 2011; (p. 57-68)
'In J. M. Coetzee's 2003 book Elizabeth Costello, the title character's son watches as she gives a painful radio interview, and thinks: 'A writer, not a thinker. Writers and thinkers: chalk and cheese. No, not chalk and cheese: fish and fowl. But which is she, the fish or the fowl? Which is her medium: water or air?' Coetzee's Costello books challenge the common divide between writing and thinking and raise various questions around the traditional elevation of reason above embodiment in contemporary scholarship. This paper takes the 'late style' of J. M. Coetzee's 2003 book Elizabeth Costello and 2005 book Slow Man and uses them as a lens through which to reread his previous books, both novels and criticism, while exploring Coetzee's preoccupation with the act of writing and the position of the writer. It also addresses the ethical questions surrounding fictional embodiment: Why embody another? what good does it do? could it, in fact, do harm? and in what terms are we to describe the relationship between author and character? In this paper I posit the language of analogy and metaphor, of figures of speech, as neither 'human weaknesses,' as philosophers like Thomas Nagel and Peter Singer may see them, nor as 'contagions,' but as sites of clarification, equivalent in many ways to the uneasy ethical lines between writer and written.' (Author's abstract)
Cultural Criticism in the Australian Fiction Patrick Hayes , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: J. M. Coetzee and the Novel : Writing and Politics after Beckett 2010; (p. 223-259)
'This concluding chapter considers Coetzee's Australian fiction in relation to a longstanding tradition of cultural criticism directed at the moral and political condition of modernity. It has recently been argued that this tradition, for all its many differences of emphasis, has as its shared characteristic the deployment of a ‘cultural principle’ that displaces politics and itself lays claim to the role of social authority: this chapter sets Coetzee in the context of the most important new thinking about the tradition of cultural criticism, making special reference to the recent debate between Stefan Collini and Francis Mulhern. It shows that Coetzee sustainedly tries to refuse the moral and political simplifications that at times have characterized this tradition—allusion is made in particular to the work of Benda, Arnold, Nietzsche, and T. S. Eliot—and that his fiction opens up a line of cultural criticism that more subtly navigates the complex terrain of political modernity.' Source: Patrick Hayes.
J. M. Coetzee's Australian Realism Elleke Boehmer , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Poetics : Genre and Form 2011; (p. 202-218) Strong Opinions : J. M. Coetzee and the Authority of Contemporary Fiction 2011; (p. 3-18)
y Acts of Visitation : The Narrative of J.M. Coetzee María J. López , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2011 Z1880004 2011 single work criticism

'This study traces, in J.M. Coetzee's fictional and non-fictional production, an imaginative and intellectual masterplot deriving from Coetzee's perception of European presence in (South) Africa as having its origin in an act of illegitimate penetration and fraudulent visitation. In Coetzee's novels, the historical and political problem of a hostile occupation and unfair distribution of the land finds a correspondence in the domestic space of house and farm, and the uneasy cohabitation of its occupants, along with the relation between hosts and guests. The seminal dimension of the categories of penetration and visitation is highlighted, as these are shown to operate not only on a spatial level but also on an epistemological, physical, psychological, hermeneutic, metafictional and ethical one: we encounter literary and psychological secrets that resist decipherment, bodies that cannot be penetrated, writers depicted as intruders, parents that ask to be welcomed by their children.
This study also identifies, in Coetzee's narrative, an ethical proposal grounded on a logic of excess and unconditionality - a logic of 'not enough' - lying behind certain acts of hospitality, friendship, kindness, care, and guidance to the gate of death, acts that may transform prevailing unequal socio-historical conditions and hostile personal relationships, characterized by a logic of parasitism and intrusion. As the figure of the writer progressively gains explicit prominence in Coetzee's literary production, special attention will be paid to it, as it alternately appears as secretary and master, migrant and intruder, pervert and foe, citizen and neighbour. Overall, Acts of Visitation analyzes how Coetzee's works depict the (South) African land, the Karoo farm, the familial household or the writer's and literary character's house as simultaneously contending and redemptive sites in which urgent historical, ethical, and metafictional issues are spatially explored and dramatized.' (Publishers' website)

Works published before Coetzee's arrival in Australia including, Dusklands, In the Heart of the Country, Waiting for the Barbarians, Life &​ Times of Michael K, Age of Iron, Disgrace, Foe, Boyhood and The Master of Petersburg are also discussed in this critical work.

Melancholic Consolation? J. M. Coetzee, Irony and the Aesthetics of the Sublime Johan Geertsema , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Literature of Melancholia : Early Modern to Postmodern. 2011; (p. 240-253)
Emigration and Photography in J.M. Coetzee’s Slow Man Donald Powers , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 49 no. 4 2013; (p. 458-469)
'This article examines how photographs in J.M. Coetzee’s novel Slow Man focus questions about the muteness and mutability of the historical record, particularly in the context of migrancy, while elaborating the metafictional dynamic between the protagonist Paul Rayment and his nominal author Elizabeth Costello. Drawing on the work on photography of Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag, the article argues that the dispute among the characters over Drago’s “forgery” of one of Rayment’s Fauchery photographs foregrounds how the past, in the retrievable form of a static photographic image, is available for reinterpretation and reconfiguring in the present. Whereas in the novels of a writer like W.G. Sebald black-and-white photographs are included as a sign of the silence around personal histories touched by communal trauma, in Slow Man colourless photographs function as a thematic motif to highlight such silences, and more centrally to emphasize how a personal history can be as readily assimilated to a collective history as superimposed over it.' (Editor's abstract)
Slow Man Overboard : J.M. Coetzee on Australian Hospitality Maria Takolander , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 539-545)
“What Used to Lie Outside the Frame” : Boundaries of Photography, Subjectivity and Fiction in Three Novels by J.M. Coetzee Ayala Amir , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , vol. 29 no. 4 2013; (p. 58-79)
'The concept of frame and its inherent tensions, as addressed by contemporary thinking, is the theoretical focus of this article, which examines representations of photography in three of J.M. Coetzee’s novels (Dusklands ([1974]1983), Age of Iron (1990) and Slow Man (2005)). Photography is treated as a site where Coetzee explores the issues that preoccupy him throughout his work: subjectivity, its boundaries and the possibility of intersubjectivity in relation to the very act of storytelling. The article offers a metaphorical reading of such elements of photography as the blow-up, the negative and digital photography in order to reflect upon Coetzee’s engagement with the possibility of openness to transformation, otherness and futurity implied by both the photographic frame and intersubjectivity in life as well as in fiction.' (Author's abstract)
Miguel de Cervantes and J.M. Coetzee : An Unacknowledged Paternity María J. López , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , vol. 29 no. 4 2013; (p. 80-97)
'This article points to the 17th-century Spanish writer, Miguel de Cervantes, as one important literary predecessor of the contemporary South African writer, J.M. Coetzee, a relation that has generally passed unnoticed among critics. This relation is brought to the foreground in Coetzee’s most recent novel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), but it also underlies his previous ones, Age of Iron (1998), Disgrace (2000), and Slow Man (2005), as well as his critical pieces, “The Novel Today” (1988) and the “Jerusalem Prize Acceptance Speech” (1992b), all of which contain echoes of Cervantes’s masterpiece, Don Quixote ([1605, 1615]2005). My argument is that the conflict between imagination and reality, the novel and history, central in Coetzee’s fictional and non-fictional production, needs to be re-examined as a fundamentally Cervantine one. The adventures and fate of Don Quixote lie behind Coetzee’s exploration of whether literature may be an effective and ethical guide in our dealings with reality, whether the ordinary may be transformed into the extraordinary, and of the relation between the literary imagination and the onslaughts of the real world.' (Publisher's blurb)
Last amended 2 Dec 2014 10:46:43
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