Henry Kendall single work   poetry   "He was born at the foot of the mountain,"
Alternative title: The Late Henry Kendall
Issue Details: First known date: 1883 1883
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Kiama Independent, and Shoalhaven Advertiser 16 October 1883 Z1175929 1883 newspaper issue 1883
  • Appears in:
    y Illawarra Mercury 19 April 1884 Z1175954 1884 newspaper issue 1884
  • Appears in:
    y The Poetical Works of Henry Kendall Henry Kendall , Thomas Thornton Reed (editor), Adelaide : Libraries Board of South Australia , 1966 Z571473 1966 selected work poetry This critical edition includes 90 previously uncollected poems and collates manuscripts of the poems and their appearances in periodicals and newspapers during the poet's life-time. There are copious biographical and critical notes, indexes and a bibliography. Adelaide : Libraries Board of South Australia , 1966 pg. 520-521

Works about this Work

The Tree and Its Voices : What the Casuarina Says Barbara Holloway , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
'The tree known popularly and scientifically as the casuarina has been consistently noticed for the sounds made as wind passes through its unusual foliage of needles and leaf scales. The acoustic experience of the casuarina — with subspecies found throughout Australia — has been represented as 'haunted', 'grieving' and voicing the secret language of initiates. This essay traces intriguing conceptual and aesthetic representations of the 'voice' and its listeners found across both Aboriginal and white Australian cultures in traditional English verse, Aboriginal prose narrative, accounts of cultural practices, and hybrid blends of all three. The essay adopts the notion of 'listening to listening' to set out the many forms of story the tree's sounds generate their contribution to identifying places, and to suggest a specific Aboriginal song-line appears to underlie the divergent replications of tree-'voice' across southern Australia.' (Author's abstract)
The Tree and Its Voices : What the Casuarina Says Barbara Holloway , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
'The tree known popularly and scientifically as the casuarina has been consistently noticed for the sounds made as wind passes through its unusual foliage of needles and leaf scales. The acoustic experience of the casuarina — with subspecies found throughout Australia — has been represented as 'haunted', 'grieving' and voicing the secret language of initiates. This essay traces intriguing conceptual and aesthetic representations of the 'voice' and its listeners found across both Aboriginal and white Australian cultures in traditional English verse, Aboriginal prose narrative, accounts of cultural practices, and hybrid blends of all three. The essay adopts the notion of 'listening to listening' to set out the many forms of story the tree's sounds generate their contribution to identifying places, and to suggest a specific Aboriginal song-line appears to underlie the divergent replications of tree-'voice' across southern Australia.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 5 Mar 2011 17:05:35
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