y Spirit Man single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1980 1980
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • North Ryde, Ryde - Gladesville - Hunters Hill area, Northwest Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Eden Paperbacks , 1988 .
      Extent: 171p.
      ISBN: 0207158703
      Series: Eden Paperbacks Angus and Robertson (publisher), 1987 series - publisher This paperback imprint of Angus and Robertson was launched in September 1987. The first titles included Upfield's Winds of Evil and Derryn Hinch's Death at Newport.

Works about this Work

Literature : A Step in the Right Direction Noela McNamara , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic , vol. 13 no. 1 2014;
'Literature offers the opportunity to encounter worlds beyond one’s own circumstances, environment, and situation. As an intercultural phenomenon, literary critique and analysis without borders can only be achieved by recognising cultural borders. Reading the literature of different cultures opens literary discourses to cross-cultural dialogue, but for too long, the lack of Indigenous literature within Australian literary discourses stymied the social potential of this intercultural phenomenon. Pressure from the global literary community has necessitated a vast shift of white consciousness to actively embrace narratives of different cultural dimensions, and novels that highlight cultural borders have become a key feature of Australian literature. Invisible literary borders have become apparent through exposure to the once silent voices that now emphasise messages of difference. Indigenous writers including Alexis Wright, Sally Morgan, Kim Scott, Jackie Huggins, Anita Heiss, Larissa Behrendt and Alice Nannup have opened reader consciousness to a broad scope of Indigenous perspectives. Within the arena of literary theories, the writer, reader and novels themselves have all had moments of glory, and while particular texts or authors have been immortalised, others have slipped into oblivion. Through the first person narrative of a non-Indigenous woman, this paper reveals how an intercultural literary experience revealed the restrictions of standard literary critique practices and inspired the creation of a relational discourse to engage with Indigenous voices as part of a methodological process. This intercultural literary process has the potential to inspire cultural awareness through acceptance and understanding of difference to overcome cultural unconsciousness. Such development has the capacity to destabilise invisible borders embedding lasting change in the consciousness of Australian readers and provide a foundational and fundamental step toward sustainable outcomes for Indigenous people.' (Publication summary)
'This Fiction It Don't Go Away': Narrative As an Index to Palm Island's Past and Present Cheryl M. Taylor , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , vol. 16 no. 1 2009; (p. 35-67)
This article describes an abundant tradition of Palm Island narrrative, from early "whitewash" travelogues, to a previously unrecognised place-based corpus of black writing that includes the work of Boori Pryor. It discusses the presentation of Palm Island in poetry and in novels by Thea Astley and Elizabeth O'Conner.
Gender and Race Relations in Elizabeth O'Conner's Northern Homesteads Cheryl M. Taylor , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 20-31)
This article examines Elizabeth O'Conner's seven books, published between 1958 and 1980, as works which functioned ideologically to implement a desire in post-World War II Australia to reformulate and reaffirm the conservative values of the frontier era. Used as exemplifications of national discourses in their era, O'Conner's books focus on representations of the homestead and reveal a number of common parameters, such as hierarchical middle-class structures, concentration on the solidity of marriage and on feminised, domesticated spaces contextualised within an outdoor masculine world of work, and an assumption of Aboriginal inferiority. Thus homesteads in these popular books serve as sites for preserving class and racial distinctions.
Man and Beast John Miles , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 May 1980; (p. 35)

— Review of Spirit Man Elizabeth O'Conner 1980 single work novel
Man and Beast John Miles , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 May 1980; (p. 35)

— Review of Spirit Man Elizabeth O'Conner 1980 single work novel
Gender and Race Relations in Elizabeth O'Conner's Northern Homesteads Cheryl M. Taylor , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 20-31)
This article examines Elizabeth O'Conner's seven books, published between 1958 and 1980, as works which functioned ideologically to implement a desire in post-World War II Australia to reformulate and reaffirm the conservative values of the frontier era. Used as exemplifications of national discourses in their era, O'Conner's books focus on representations of the homestead and reveal a number of common parameters, such as hierarchical middle-class structures, concentration on the solidity of marriage and on feminised, domesticated spaces contextualised within an outdoor masculine world of work, and an assumption of Aboriginal inferiority. Thus homesteads in these popular books serve as sites for preserving class and racial distinctions.
'This Fiction It Don't Go Away': Narrative As an Index to Palm Island's Past and Present Cheryl M. Taylor , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , vol. 16 no. 1 2009; (p. 35-67)
This article describes an abundant tradition of Palm Island narrrative, from early "whitewash" travelogues, to a previously unrecognised place-based corpus of black writing that includes the work of Boori Pryor. It discusses the presentation of Palm Island in poetry and in novels by Thea Astley and Elizabeth O'Conner.
Literature : A Step in the Right Direction Noela McNamara , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic , vol. 13 no. 1 2014;
'Literature offers the opportunity to encounter worlds beyond one’s own circumstances, environment, and situation. As an intercultural phenomenon, literary critique and analysis without borders can only be achieved by recognising cultural borders. Reading the literature of different cultures opens literary discourses to cross-cultural dialogue, but for too long, the lack of Indigenous literature within Australian literary discourses stymied the social potential of this intercultural phenomenon. Pressure from the global literary community has necessitated a vast shift of white consciousness to actively embrace narratives of different cultural dimensions, and novels that highlight cultural borders have become a key feature of Australian literature. Invisible literary borders have become apparent through exposure to the once silent voices that now emphasise messages of difference. Indigenous writers including Alexis Wright, Sally Morgan, Kim Scott, Jackie Huggins, Anita Heiss, Larissa Behrendt and Alice Nannup have opened reader consciousness to a broad scope of Indigenous perspectives. Within the arena of literary theories, the writer, reader and novels themselves have all had moments of glory, and while particular texts or authors have been immortalised, others have slipped into oblivion. Through the first person narrative of a non-Indigenous woman, this paper reveals how an intercultural literary experience revealed the restrictions of standard literary critique practices and inspired the creation of a relational discourse to engage with Indigenous voices as part of a methodological process. This intercultural literary process has the potential to inspire cultural awareness through acceptance and understanding of difference to overcome cultural unconsciousness. Such development has the capacity to destabilise invisible borders embedding lasting change in the consciousness of Australian readers and provide a foundational and fundamental step toward sustainable outcomes for Indigenous people.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 13 Apr 2012 14:00:27
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