y The Ungardeners single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1925 1925
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Notes

  • Dedication: 'To the Chief Justice of New South Wales Sir William Cullen, K.C.M.G., L.L.D. and Lady Cullen, the two most dauntless garden makers and truest garden lovers I know.'
  • Epigraph: 'I had a secret laughter, / I laughed it near the wall: / Only the ivy and the wind / May tell of it at all.' -- Walter de la Mare.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1925 .
      Extent: 256 p., [4] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.

Works about this Work

Garden Plots Emma Ashmere , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Northerly : The Northern Rivers Writers' Centre Magazine , July-August 2015; (p. 12-13)
An overview of Emma Ashmere's favourite gardens in Australian literature.
Gardening and the Cultivation of Australian National Space : The Writings of Ethel Turner Susan K. Martin , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , November vol. 18 no. 42 2003; (p. 285-298)
The article concentrates on Turner's allegorical portrayal of the Australian nation as a domestic space: garden, or house, or both, particularly in her novel The Ungardeners. 'Turner's later fiction, although interested in modernity and social change, retains the garden as an emblematic space, and uses it to map the impact of modernity and the shift in national allegiances from England to the United States' (285). In her earlier fiction the garden tends to be represented as a private, feminine space and is used to examine the possibilities and limitations for the female national subject. Martin argues that in The Ungardeners elements of this gendering remain but are used to a more generalised examination of national space and the place of the modern nation.
Gardening and the Cultivation of Australian National Space : The Writings of Ethel Turner Susan K. Martin , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , November vol. 18 no. 42 2003; (p. 285-298)
The article concentrates on Turner's allegorical portrayal of the Australian nation as a domestic space: garden, or house, or both, particularly in her novel The Ungardeners. 'Turner's later fiction, although interested in modernity and social change, retains the garden as an emblematic space, and uses it to map the impact of modernity and the shift in national allegiances from England to the United States' (285). In her earlier fiction the garden tends to be represented as a private, feminine space and is used to examine the possibilities and limitations for the female national subject. Martin argues that in The Ungardeners elements of this gendering remain but are used to a more generalised examination of national space and the place of the modern nation.
Garden Plots Emma Ashmere , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Northerly : The Northern Rivers Writers' Centre Magazine , July-August 2015; (p. 12-13)
An overview of Emma Ashmere's favourite gardens in Australian literature.
Last amended 22 Jan 2008 13:48:02
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