form y Japanese Story single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Sandy, a geologist, finds herself stuck on a field trip to the Pilbara desert with a Japanese man she finds inscrutable, annoying and decidedly arrogant. Hiromitsu's view of her is not much better. Things go from bad to worse when they become stranded in one of the most remote regions on earth. JAPANESE STORY is a journey of change and discovery for its two lead characters.'

Source: Screen Australia.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Fitzroy, Fitzroy - Collingwood area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Gecko Films , 2002 .
      Extent: 100 l.p.
      Description: typescript (photocopy)
      (Manuscript) assertion
      Note/s:
      • Revised release script, July 2002.

      Holdings

      Held at: University of Queensland University of Queensland Library Fryer Library
      Location: The Hanger Collection of Australian Playscripts
      Local Id: H2109

Works about this Work

Colonial Mythology in Twenty-First Century Australian Film Ben Chapman , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 8 no. 1 2014; (p. 16-33)
'This article explores the changing nature of representations of the landscape in Australian film. It focuses on how these myths are changing in the recent films Japanese Story and Red Dog. It charts the ways that the two films represent changes to the mythological base of Australian film, as it is outlined by Ross Gibson in his book South of the West: Postcolonialism and the Narrative Construction of Australia. It also charts the way these films continue the tradition that Gibson outlines. The article criticises analysis of some recent Australian film, claiming that the analysis is too focused on emerging stories that relate to indigenous reconciliation and multicultural integration. It suggests that the methodologies used to examine landscape in Australian film need to examine visual constructions of the landscape in order to fully understand the complex process that goes into its formation in film. The article also engages in a discussion of the development of monolithic ideas of Australian identity in the twentieth century and how mining mythology in the films studied is co-opting elements of this identity. It then discusses the ways in which cultural power interacts with the political and economic spheres suggesting a wider application for work concerning cultural knowledge of society.' (Publication summary)
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
Re-Envisioning the Japanese : 'The Goddess of 1967' and 'Japanese Story' Dennis Haskell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 127-136)
'One key aspect of the revaluation of Australian identity in the last thirty years has been a reconsideration of Australia's relationships with Asia. This paper takes up this issue in relation to Japan, for many years Australia's largest economic trading partner, through examination of two Australian films, The Goddess of 1967 (2000) and Japanese Story (2004).' (p. 127).
An Australian Tale in a Japanese Story : Reading the National in Sue Brook’s Japanese Story Chew Yi Wei , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Post-Colonial Cultures and Societies , January vol. 1 no. 1 2010; (p. 56-67)
'Sue Brook's film, Japanese Story (2003) lends itself to many peculiarities. Upon hearing its title and having some perfunctory knowledge of its association with Australia, one might - due to this overt incongruity - be tempted to assume the film to be either an exercise in the nation's exoticisation of Japan, or even likening it to a Japanese production. Less impetuously and pejoratively, some would think it a film typically belonging to the pantheon of the transnational due to the presence of a Japanese actor in a supposedly all-Australian cast. Yet, should a deeper study be effected, we find Japanese Story to be substantially complex and more problematic than that, leaving the above suppositions surface and simplistic. In Japanese Story, polymorphous and fluid (conceptual) worlds imbricate and synthesise, forming a melange thick with complexity, movement and definitional subjectivity. Owing to the presence of Asian characters in the film and the external but consonant dialogue on Australia-Asia relations, the positions of Japanese Story in the film industry both nationally and transnationally are also inescapably implicated. My task however will be to argue for Japanese Story as being quintessentially national though it may not possess any ostensible nationalistic overtones. Before I proceed with an analysis of the film, contextualisation in terms of Australia-Asia relations and national cinema is a necessity: both these concepts are inextricably connected and therefore jointly scrutinised.' (Author's introduction)
Misunderstanding the Other : Colonial Fantasies in Japanese Story Peter Matthews , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 23 no. 2 2009; (p. 185-189)

'Sue Brook's film Japanese Story (2003) constitutes an important contribution to Australian cinema's ongoing exploration of its cultural encounter with the other. Thematically - and even visually, with its reliance upon the outback landscape as background - the film appears canonical in its approach, reworking ideas and images that have haunted Australian filmmakers since Ralph Smart's Bitter Springs (1950). This tradition testifies to a fascinating and deep-rooted fear of otherness within mainstream Australian culture, even though the exact object of these anxieties - indigenous people, immigrants, global capitalists, to name but a few - has tended to shift in accordance with the pressing concern of the historical movement. The revival of the Australian film industry in the early 1970s provided an insightful and rejuvenated medium for cultural commentary, coinciding as it did with both the flowering of postcolonial criticism and a shift in society away from the stultifying values of the Menzies era. The significance of Brooks's film should, therefore, be assessed from its status as a new voice in the ongoing cinematic dialogue regarding Australia's profound anxiety about its relation to the other (in its various forms).' (p. 185)

'Now You Blokes Own the Place' : Representations of Japanese Culture in Recent Australian Cinema Rebecca Coyle , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 103-114)
Representations of the Japanese in Contemporary Australian Literature and Film Erika Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Voices , vol. 2 no. 2008;
'The objective of this article is to investigate general contemporary Australian perceptions of the Japanese. I will do this by exploring how Australian contemporary literature (2006-2007) and Australian contemporary film (1997-2007) depicts Japanese characters. By analysing the representation of the Japanese characters in these areas I will attempt to gather a broad understanding of how Australians represent, perceive and identify the Japanese today.' -- Author's abstract
Desert Hauntings, Public Interiors and National Modernity : From 'The Overlanders' to 'Walkabout' and 'Japanese Story' Brigid Rooney , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 410-422)
Rock Wallabies and Mayan Temples : The Landscapes of the Pilbara in Japanese Story and the Burrup Penninsula Delys Bird , 2007-2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 21-22 2007-2008; (p. 21-28)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Space as Discourse in 'Japanese Story' Britta Kuhlenbeck , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies , Spring-Fall vol. 12 no. 1-2 2006;
Antipodean Automobility and Crash : Treachery, Trespass and Transformation of the Open Road Catherine Simpson , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , September no. 39/40 2006;
An examination of the function of car accidents in Australian film and in the Australian landscape (through roadside memorials).
Japanese Stories Brian McFarlane , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 63 no. 2 2004; (p. 88-95)
Geologist or Geisha? Disorienting Body and Landscape in Japanese Story Jane O'Sullivan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 18 no. 2 2004; (p. 140-146)
Ordinary Australian Orientalisms: Racialised and Gendered Approaches to the Turtle Beach Texts in Australia's Ambivalence Towards Asia Goldie Osuri , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Borderlands , vol. 3 no. 3 2004;
Sustaining Grief in Japanese Story and Dreaming in Motion Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 172-204)
The proposal presented by Collins and Davis throughout this book is 'that the post-Mabo era in Australian cinema can be read through the metaphor of backtracking. This intermittent activity of reviewing, mulling over and renewing icons, landscapes, characters and stories defines contemporary Australian national cinema.' The conclusion that the authors draw from their analysis of Australian cinema is that 'in the post-Mabo context, this brooding passion for raking the national repetoire of icons serves as a vernacular mode of collective mourning, a process involving both grief-work and testimony.' Source : Australian Cinema after Mabo (2004).
Killing the Gatekeeper : Autonomy, Globality and Reclaiming Australian Cinema Matthew Clayfield , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , October-December no. 33 2004;
'Recent Australian films still struggle to define a viable “national identity” – but is this even necessary?' (Publisher's abstract)
Comedy Dominates Awards Fiona Villella , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: Muse , November no. 234 2003; (p. 19)
Personal Best Jo Litson , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Limelight , October 2003; (p. 26-29)
Japanese Story : A Shift of Heart Felicity Collins , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , November - December no. 29 2003;
This multi-award winning Australian film marks a quantum leap for the Oz landscape genre film and hints at a shift in national consciousness. (From editor's abstract)
Memoirs of a Sheila Paul Byrnes , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 September 2003; (p. 10)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Film of the Week Tom Ryan , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 21 September 2003; (p. 8)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Intimacy in the Outback Peter Crayford , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Financial Review , 20-21 September 2003; (p. 40)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Bad Moon Rising Craig Mathieson , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 30 September vol. 121 no. 6392 2003; (p. 86)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Collette Mines Deep Emotions Evan Williams , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27-28 September 2003; (p. 11)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Desert Bloom Brett Evans , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , November vol. 13 no. 9 2003; (p. 44)

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Miffed and Amazed Stay to Heap Praise : Melbourne International Film Festival Lynden Barber , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 25 July 2003; (p. 14)

— Review of Harvie Krumpet Adam Elliot 2003 single work film/TV ; Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Untitled Fiona Villella , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , July-August no. 27 2003;

— Review of Japanese Story Alison Tilson 2002 single work film/TV
Comedy Dominates Awards Fiona Villella , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: Muse , November no. 234 2003; (p. 19)
Japanese Stories Brian McFarlane , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 63 no. 2 2004; (p. 88-95)
Personal Best Jo Litson , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Limelight , October 2003; (p. 26-29)
Geologist or Geisha? Disorienting Body and Landscape in Japanese Story Jane O'Sullivan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 18 no. 2 2004; (p. 140-146)
Ordinary Australian Orientalisms: Racialised and Gendered Approaches to the Turtle Beach Texts in Australia's Ambivalence Towards Asia Goldie Osuri , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Borderlands , vol. 3 no. 3 2004;
Space as Discourse in 'Japanese Story' Britta Kuhlenbeck , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies , Spring-Fall vol. 12 no. 1-2 2006;
Desert Hauntings, Public Interiors and National Modernity : From 'The Overlanders' to 'Walkabout' and 'Japanese Story' Brigid Rooney , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 410-422)
Sustaining Grief in Japanese Story and Dreaming in Motion Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 172-204)
The proposal presented by Collins and Davis throughout this book is 'that the post-Mabo era in Australian cinema can be read through the metaphor of backtracking. This intermittent activity of reviewing, mulling over and renewing icons, landscapes, characters and stories defines contemporary Australian national cinema.' The conclusion that the authors draw from their analysis of Australian cinema is that 'in the post-Mabo context, this brooding passion for raking the national repetoire of icons serves as a vernacular mode of collective mourning, a process involving both grief-work and testimony.' Source : Australian Cinema after Mabo (2004).
Representations of the Japanese in Contemporary Australian Literature and Film Erika Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Voices , vol. 2 no. 2008;
'The objective of this article is to investigate general contemporary Australian perceptions of the Japanese. I will do this by exploring how Australian contemporary literature (2006-2007) and Australian contemporary film (1997-2007) depicts Japanese characters. By analysing the representation of the Japanese characters in these areas I will attempt to gather a broad understanding of how Australians represent, perceive and identify the Japanese today.' -- Author's abstract
Misunderstanding the Other : Colonial Fantasies in Japanese Story Peter Matthews , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 23 no. 2 2009; (p. 185-189)

'Sue Brook's film Japanese Story (2003) constitutes an important contribution to Australian cinema's ongoing exploration of its cultural encounter with the other. Thematically - and even visually, with its reliance upon the outback landscape as background - the film appears canonical in its approach, reworking ideas and images that have haunted Australian filmmakers since Ralph Smart's Bitter Springs (1950). This tradition testifies to a fascinating and deep-rooted fear of otherness within mainstream Australian culture, even though the exact object of these anxieties - indigenous people, immigrants, global capitalists, to name but a few - has tended to shift in accordance with the pressing concern of the historical movement. The revival of the Australian film industry in the early 1970s provided an insightful and rejuvenated medium for cultural commentary, coinciding as it did with both the flowering of postcolonial criticism and a shift in society away from the stultifying values of the Menzies era. The significance of Brooks's film should, therefore, be assessed from its status as a new voice in the ongoing cinematic dialogue regarding Australia's profound anxiety about its relation to the other (in its various forms).' (p. 185)

Rock Wallabies and Mayan Temples : The Landscapes of the Pilbara in Japanese Story and the Burrup Penninsula Delys Bird , 2007-2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 21-22 2007-2008; (p. 21-28)
'Now You Blokes Own the Place' : Representations of Japanese Culture in Recent Australian Cinema Rebecca Coyle , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 103-114)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
Killing the Gatekeeper : Autonomy, Globality and Reclaiming Australian Cinema Matthew Clayfield , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , October-December no. 33 2004;
'Recent Australian films still struggle to define a viable “national identity” – but is this even necessary?' (Publisher's abstract)
Japanese Story : A Shift of Heart Felicity Collins , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , November - December no. 29 2003;
This multi-award winning Australian film marks a quantum leap for the Oz landscape genre film and hints at a shift in national consciousness. (From editor's abstract)
Re-Envisioning the Japanese : 'The Goddess of 1967' and 'Japanese Story' Dennis Haskell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 127-136)
'One key aspect of the revaluation of Australian identity in the last thirty years has been a reconsideration of Australia's relationships with Asia. This paper takes up this issue in relation to Japan, for many years Australia's largest economic trading partner, through examination of two Australian films, The Goddess of 1967 (2000) and Japanese Story (2004).' (p. 127).
An Australian Tale in a Japanese Story : Reading the National in Sue Brook’s Japanese Story Chew Yi Wei , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Post-Colonial Cultures and Societies , January vol. 1 no. 1 2010; (p. 56-67)
'Sue Brook's film, Japanese Story (2003) lends itself to many peculiarities. Upon hearing its title and having some perfunctory knowledge of its association with Australia, one might - due to this overt incongruity - be tempted to assume the film to be either an exercise in the nation's exoticisation of Japan, or even likening it to a Japanese production. Less impetuously and pejoratively, some would think it a film typically belonging to the pantheon of the transnational due to the presence of a Japanese actor in a supposedly all-Australian cast. Yet, should a deeper study be effected, we find Japanese Story to be substantially complex and more problematic than that, leaving the above suppositions surface and simplistic. In Japanese Story, polymorphous and fluid (conceptual) worlds imbricate and synthesise, forming a melange thick with complexity, movement and definitional subjectivity. Owing to the presence of Asian characters in the film and the external but consonant dialogue on Australia-Asia relations, the positions of Japanese Story in the film industry both nationally and transnationally are also inescapably implicated. My task however will be to argue for Japanese Story as being quintessentially national though it may not possess any ostensible nationalistic overtones. Before I proceed with an analysis of the film, contextualisation in terms of Australia-Asia relations and national cinema is a necessity: both these concepts are inextricably connected and therefore jointly scrutinised.' (Author's introduction)
Colonial Mythology in Twenty-First Century Australian Film Ben Chapman , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 8 no. 1 2014; (p. 16-33)
'This article explores the changing nature of representations of the landscape in Australian film. It focuses on how these myths are changing in the recent films Japanese Story and Red Dog. It charts the ways that the two films represent changes to the mythological base of Australian film, as it is outlined by Ross Gibson in his book South of the West: Postcolonialism and the Narrative Construction of Australia. It also charts the way these films continue the tradition that Gibson outlines. The article criticises analysis of some recent Australian film, claiming that the analysis is too focused on emerging stories that relate to indigenous reconciliation and multicultural integration. It suggests that the methodologies used to examine landscape in Australian film need to examine visual constructions of the landscape in order to fully understand the complex process that goes into its formation in film. The article also engages in a discussion of the development of monolithic ideas of Australian identity in the twentieth century and how mining mythology in the films studied is co-opting elements of this identity. It then discusses the ways in which cultural power interacts with the political and economic spheres suggesting a wider application for work concerning cultural knowledge of society.' (Publication summary)
Antipodean Automobility and Crash : Treachery, Trespass and Transformation of the Open Road Catherine Simpson , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , September no. 39/40 2006;
An examination of the function of car accidents in Australian film and in the Australian landscape (through roadside memorials).

Awards

2004 shortlisted New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Betty Roland Prize for Scriptwriting
2003 winner Australian Film Institute Awards Best Film
2003 winner Australian Film Institute Awards Best Original Screenplay Award sponsored by Parker Pens.
2003 winner Queensland Premier's Literary Awards Best Film or Television Script
2003 winner Film Critics Circle of Australia Best Film
2003 shortlisted Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Scripts
2003 winner Australian Film Institute Awards Screenwriting Prize Award sponsored by Harper's Bazaar
2003 winner AWGIE Awards Film Award Feature Film - Original
2003 nominated Film Critics Circle of Australia Best Original Screenplay
2003 winner Inside Film Awards Best Feature Film
2003 nominated Inside Film Awards Best Script
Last amended 13 Oct 2014 14:35:12
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