Issue Details: First known date: 1987 1987
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Traces the fate of the 160,000 men, women and children transported between the dispatch of the First Fleet in May 1787 to Botany Bay, and the arrival of the latest convict ship in 1868 in Western Australia.' (Source: Trove)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording and braille

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins Harvill , 1987 .
      Extent: xvi, 688p., [42]p. of platesp.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 0002173611
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1987 .
      Extent: xvi, 688pp.
      Description: illus., [41] p. of plates.
      ISBN: 0394506685
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins Harvill , 1987 .
      Extent: xvi, 688pp.
      Edition info: Bicentenary ed.
      Limited edition info: Limited edition of 250 signed and numbered copies.
      Description: illus., [42] p. of plates.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Vintage , 1988 .
      Extent: xviii, 62pp.
      Description: illus.,[40] p. of plates.
      ISBN: 0394753666 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Pan ; Collins , 1988 .
      Extent: xvi, 688pp.
      Description: illus.,[42] p. of plates.
      ISBN: 0330298925
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins Harvill , 1996 .
      Extent: xvi, 688pp.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1860461506 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 2003 .
      Extent: xvi, 688pp.
      Description: illus., [32] p. of plates.
      ISBN: 0099448548 (pbk.)
Alternative title: Australien : Die Grunderzeit des Funften Kontinents
Language: German
    • Düsseldorf,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Econ Verlags , 1987 .
      Extent: 703p.
      Description: illus.,[32] p. of plates.

Works about this Work

New Cultural Landscapes : Australian Narratives in Literature and Film Eduardo Marks de Marques , Anelise R. Corseuil , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ilha Do Desterro : A Journal of English Language , vol. 69 no. 2 2016;
'Australia. Terra Australis Incognita. Even before its official finding by Captain James Cook in 1770, the “land down under” already circulated in the European imagination. The giant mass of land necessary to balance a flat Earth (as antipodal to Europe) could only be home to a great many monstrous fauna and flora, as it was also the cultural counterpart to Europe. However, giant one-eyed monsters and sea serpents were not found by Captain Cook upon his arrival on Botany Bay, now part of Sydney. By declaring the land terra nullius, Cook ignored the many Aboriginal communities that had lived in Australia for over 75,000 years and such act has given way to one of the core elements in the development of Australian culture and history: the relationship between whites and Aborigines in the development of the nation.' (Introduction)
The House of the Dead David Malouf , 2014 single work prose
— Appears in: A First Place 2014; (p. 79-98)
Books that Changed Me : Austen Tayshus Austen Tayshus , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 10 February 2013; (p. 14)
Books That Changed Me : Catherine Jinks Catherine Jinks , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 24 February 2013; (p. 14)
Literary Guide to Australia Nicholas Shakespeare , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Telegraph , 10 July 2013;
'We asked some of the world's most eminent writers to offer literary tours of the places they know best.'
Coming to Terms with Australia's Past : Thomas Keneally's Bring Larks and Heroes Caterina Colomba , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 27 no. 1 2013; (p. 25-29)
'Colomba talks about Australia's past in Thomas Keneally's novel Bring Larks and Heroes. Thomas Keneally's third novel, Bring Larks and Heroes, is among the most significant works of the 1960s to portray the penal society of Australia's past at "the world's worse end". Published during a time of deep social and cultural change in Australia, the book is an investigation of the mechanisms that lie at the foundation of an oppressively brutal society, in a world where the values of the "old" clash with, and are transformed by, the reality of the "new." The release of the novel marked a crucial moment in the life of its author by establishing him as a professional writer.' (Editor's abstract)
Australia : An Alternat(or) Future Brendan Lee , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Worlds : Art and Science Fiction 2013; (p. 182-199)
Books Shape Ideals, Dreams Tony Abbott , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 May 2012; (p. 12)
Abbott's Literary Taste Bridgitte Dwyer , 2012 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 May 2012; (p. 21)
Hughes's Demise Exposes the Void Troy Bramston , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 13 August 2012; (p. 12)
Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
Identity in Australia Xiaojin Zhou , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Fixity to Fluidity : The Theme of Identity in Thomas Keneally's Fiction 2009; (p. 5-10)
Representations of Irishness in Contemporary Australian Fiction Representações de ser irlandês na ficção australiana contemporânea Stella Borgk Barthet , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture , January vol. 30 no. 1 2008; (p. 45-51)
Australian history generates great fervour in intellectual and political circles in present-day Australia, and Ireland's contribution to the making of the continent is a hotly debated issue. This essay deals with Irishness in contemporary Australian fiction with a 19th century setting. The representations I will be exploring concern the Convict, the Bushranger, and the Catholic. I have put these three figures in ascending order, according to the degree of Irishness that they tend to carry with them in contemporary Australian fiction. If we are dealing with a convict; then the character may or may not be Irish; if a bush-ranger, then he is more likely than not to be Irish; if the character is Catholic, then he is certainly Irish.

A história da Austrália causa grandes debates intelectuais e políticos na Austrália contemporânea e a contribuição irlandesa na construção e no desenvolvimento do continente suscita muitas discussões. Esse artigo analisa a qualidade de ser irlandês, na ficçãoaustraliana contemporânea, tendo o século XIX como pano de fundo. Discute-se a representação do detento, do mateiro e do católico, colocados em ordem ascendente na medida em que encarnam o grau de qualidade de irlandês que cada um carrega na ficção australiana. Se o personagem é um detento, pode ou não pode ser irlandês; se é um mateiro, provavelmente é um irlandês; se o personagem é católico, com certeza é irlandês. (Author's abstract)
The Fatal Shore : A History of the Transportation of Convicts to Australia 1787-1868 : Robert Hughes (1938- ) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 280-284)
Sociological and Historical Perspectives on Australia as Portrayed by Contemporary Australian Writers Rosemary Kerr , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 19-27)
Sociological and Historical Perspectives on Australia as Portrayed by Contemporary Australian Writers Rosemary Kerr , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 19-27)
The Fatal Shore : A History of the Transportation of Convicts to Australia 1787-1868 : Robert Hughes (1938- ) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 280-284)
Representations of Irishness in Contemporary Australian Fiction Representações de ser irlandês na ficção australiana contemporânea Stella Borgk Barthet , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture , January vol. 30 no. 1 2008; (p. 45-51)
Australian history generates great fervour in intellectual and political circles in present-day Australia, and Ireland's contribution to the making of the continent is a hotly debated issue. This essay deals with Irishness in contemporary Australian fiction with a 19th century setting. The representations I will be exploring concern the Convict, the Bushranger, and the Catholic. I have put these three figures in ascending order, according to the degree of Irishness that they tend to carry with them in contemporary Australian fiction. If we are dealing with a convict; then the character may or may not be Irish; if a bush-ranger, then he is more likely than not to be Irish; if the character is Catholic, then he is certainly Irish.

A história da Austrália causa grandes debates intelectuais e políticos na Austrália contemporânea e a contribuição irlandesa na construção e no desenvolvimento do continente suscita muitas discussões. Esse artigo analisa a qualidade de ser irlandês, na ficçãoaustraliana contemporânea, tendo o século XIX como pano de fundo. Discute-se a representação do detento, do mateiro e do católico, colocados em ordem ascendente na medida em que encarnam o grau de qualidade de irlandês que cada um carrega na ficção australiana. Se o personagem é um detento, pode ou não pode ser irlandês; se é um mateiro, provavelmente é um irlandês; se o personagem é católico, com certeza é irlandês. (Author's abstract)
Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
Books Shape Ideals, Dreams Tony Abbott , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 May 2012; (p. 12)
Abbott's Literary Taste Bridgitte Dwyer , 2012 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 May 2012; (p. 21)
Hughes's Demise Exposes the Void Troy Bramston , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 13 August 2012; (p. 12)
Books that Changed Me : Austen Tayshus Austen Tayshus , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 10 February 2013; (p. 14)
Books That Changed Me : Catherine Jinks Catherine Jinks , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 24 February 2013; (p. 14)
Literary Guide to Australia Nicholas Shakespeare , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Telegraph , 10 July 2013;
'We asked some of the world's most eminent writers to offer literary tours of the places they know best.'
Coming to Terms with Australia's Past : Thomas Keneally's Bring Larks and Heroes Caterina Colomba , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 27 no. 1 2013; (p. 25-29)
'Colomba talks about Australia's past in Thomas Keneally's novel Bring Larks and Heroes. Thomas Keneally's third novel, Bring Larks and Heroes, is among the most significant works of the 1960s to portray the penal society of Australia's past at "the world's worse end". Published during a time of deep social and cultural change in Australia, the book is an investigation of the mechanisms that lie at the foundation of an oppressively brutal society, in a world where the values of the "old" clash with, and are transformed by, the reality of the "new." The release of the novel marked a crucial moment in the life of its author by establishing him as a professional writer.' (Editor's abstract)
Australia : An Alternat(or) Future Brendan Lee , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Worlds : Art and Science Fiction 2013; (p. 182-199)
The House of the Dead David Malouf , 2014 single work prose
— Appears in: A First Place 2014; (p. 79-98)
Identity in Australia Xiaojin Zhou , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Fixity to Fluidity : The Theme of Identity in Thomas Keneally's Fiction 2009; (p. 5-10)
New Cultural Landscapes : Australian Narratives in Literature and Film Eduardo Marks de Marques , Anelise R. Corseuil , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ilha Do Desterro : A Journal of English Language , vol. 69 no. 2 2016;
'Australia. Terra Australis Incognita. Even before its official finding by Captain James Cook in 1770, the “land down under” already circulated in the European imagination. The giant mass of land necessary to balance a flat Earth (as antipodal to Europe) could only be home to a great many monstrous fauna and flora, as it was also the cultural counterpart to Europe. However, giant one-eyed monsters and sea serpents were not found by Captain Cook upon his arrival on Botany Bay, now part of Sydney. By declaring the land terra nullius, Cook ignored the many Aboriginal communities that had lived in Australia for over 75,000 years and such act has given way to one of the core elements in the development of Australian culture and history: the relationship between whites and Aborigines in the development of the nation.' (Introduction)
Last amended 3 Mar 2015 09:55:44
Subjects:
  • 1787-1868
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